Update

You are looking at 1-20 of 37 entries  for:

  • All: Dinarchus x
clear all

Did you mean Dīnarchus Dīnarchus

View:

Overview

Dinarchus

(c.360–c.290 bc), the last of the Ten Attic Orators. Born at Corinth, he went to Athens to study rhetoric under Theophrastus and from 336/5 constantly and successfully practised ...

Dīnarchus

Dīnarchus   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
140 words

... ( c. 360– c. 290 bc ), the last of the Ten Attic Orators . Born at Corinth , he went to Athens to study rhetoric under Theophrastus and from 336/5 constantly and successfully practised the profession of speech‐writer. As a metic , he was barred from a political career, nor was he able himself to speak in court, but when after the Lamian War the leading orators of the age, Demosthenes (2) and Hyperides , had met their deaths, Dinarchus was left in unchallenged and lucrative supremacy, and the period of rule by Demetrius of Phaleron, his...

Dinarchus

Dinarchus   Quick reference

George Law Cawkwell

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
477 words

... ( c. 360– c. 290 bc ), the last of the canonical Ten Attic Orators. For the outline of his life we largely depend on Dionysius of Halicarnasus On Dinarchus , chs. 2, 3, and 9. He was born at Corinth but went to Athens to study rhetoric under Theophrastus and from 336/5 on constantly and successfully practised the profession of speech-writer ( logographos ). As a metic (resident foreigner), he was barred from a political career nor was he able himself to speak in court, but when after the Lamian War the leading orators of the age, Demosthenes ...

Dinarchus

Dinarchus (c.360–c.290 bc)   Reference library

George Law Cawkwell

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
583 words

... ( Δείναρχος ) ( c. 360– c. 290 bc ) , the last of the Ten Attic Orators (for the formation of the canon , see Caecilius ( 1 ) ). For the outline of his life we largely depend on Dionysius ( 7 ) of Halicarnassus On Dinarchus , chs. 2, 3, and 9. He was born at Corinth but went to Athens to study rhetoric under Theophrastus and from 336/5 on constantly and successfully practised the profession of speech-writer ( logographos ). As a metic , he was barred from a political career nor was he able himself to speak in court, but when after...

Dinarchus

Dinarchus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(c.360–c.290 bc),the last of the Ten Attic Orators. Born at Corinth, he went to Athens to study rhetoric under Theophrastus and from 336/5 constantly and successfully practised the profession of ...
Attic Orators

Attic Orators  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
By the 2nd cent. ad there was a list of ten Athenian orators (Lysias, Isaeus, Hyperīdēs, Isocratēs, Dīnarchus, Aeschinēs (1), Antiphōn, Lycurgus, Andocidēs, Dēmosthenēs (2) whose classic status was ...
Stratocles

Stratocles  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Son of Euthydemus, Athenian from the deme of Diomeia (c. 355 to after 292 bc). He was the official prosecutor of Harpalus (Dinarchus 1. 1. 20) (324/3). After Demetrius (4)'s ...
Didymus

Didymus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1st cent. bc) belonged to the school founded at Alexandria by Aristarchus (2) and himself taught there. A scholar of immense learning and industry (cf. his nicknames Chalkenteros (‘Brazen-bowels’) ...
Lysias

Lysias  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Attic orator, d. c.380 bc. His work is discussed in Plato's Phaedrus; in Plato's Republic, his father Cephalus is an elderly Syracusan, resident as a metic in Athens, and friend of assorted Athenian ...
Dionysius of Halicarnassus

Dionysius of Halicarnassus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Greek critic and historian, lived and taught rhetoric at Rome, arriving ‘at the time Augustus put an end to the civil war’, and publishing the first part of his Roman Antiquities (Rhōmaïkē ...
Attic Orators

Attic Orators   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
90 words

...Orators By the 2nd cent. ad there was a list of ten Athenian orators ( Lysias , Isaeus , Hyperīdēs , Isocratēs , Dīnarchus , Aeschinēs (1) , Antiphōn , Lycurgus , Andocidēs , Dēmosthenēs (2) whose classic status was recognized. Paradoxically, Lysias, Isaeus, and Dinarchus, being metics, could not deliver speeches to Athenian juries or to the assembly, and Isocrates never addressed a large audience; so this entry would be better entitled ‘Speech‐writers active in Athens’, which is what all ten did, and we have only their surviving scripts by...

Attic Orators

Attic Orators   Reference library

Christopher Carey

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
300 words

...Orators By the time of Hermogenes ( 2 ) ( On Ideas 2. 11) writing in the 2nd cent. ad there was a list of ten Athenian orators ( Lysias , Isaeus (1) , Hyperides , Isocrates , Dinarchus , Aeschines (1) , Antiphon (1) , Lycurgus (3) , Andocides , Demosthenes ( 2 ) ) whose classic status was recognized; the same selection figures in the Lives of the Ten Orators falsely ascribed to Plutarch . This follows a tendency typical of the Hellenistic period, to produce select lists for different genres ( see canon ). The number ten apparently goes...

Dionysius of Halicarnassus

Dionysius of Halicarnassus   Reference library

Donald Andrew Frank Moore Russell

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
410 words

..., Isaeus , Demosthenes ), prefaced by a programmatic statement of distaste for ‘Asianic’ rhetoric, hope for an ‘Attic’ revival, and the writer’s consciousness that this happy change is due to the good taste of the Roman governing class; (3) a group of occasional works: On Dinarchus, On Thucydides (important), two letters to Ammaeus (one on Demosthenes’ alleged indebtedness to Aristotle , the other on Thucydides), and a letter to Gnaeus Pompeius on Plato , of whose ‘dithyrambic’ style Dionysius was very critical; (4) On Arrangement of Words ( De...

Didymus

Didymus   Quick reference

John Francis Lockwood, Robert Browning, and Nigel Guy Wilson

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
342 words

...on Homer , Hesiod , Pindar , Bacchylides , Choerilus, Aeschylus , Sophocles , Ion of Chios, Euripides , Achaeus, Cratinus, Aristophanes (1) , Phrynichus , Eupolis , Menander , Thucydides , Antiphon , Isaeus , Isocrates , Aeschines , Demosthenes , Hyperides , Dinarchus . Much of the oldest material in the scholia to Pindar, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes is ultimately derived from Didymus. A papyrus fragment of his commentary on Demosthenes' Philippics illustrates his compilatory method; the quality of the discussion leaves a great...

Dionysius of Halicarnassus

Dionysius of Halicarnassus   Quick reference

Donald Andrew Frank Moore Russell

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
407 words

..., Demosthenes ), prefaced by a programmatic statement of distaste for ‘Asianic’ (florid) rhetoric, hope for an ‘Attic’ revival, and the writer's consciousness that this happy change is due to the good taste of the Roman governing class; (3) a group of occasional works: On Dinarchus , On Thucydides (important), two letters to Ammaeus (one on Demosthenes' alleged indebtedness to Aristotle, the other on Thucydides ), and a letter to Cn. Pompeius on Plato , of whose ‘dithyrambic’ style Dionysius was very critical; (4) On Arrangement of Words ( De...

Attic Oratory

Attic Oratory   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,137 words

...tr. J. Gillies , London, 1778 · Demosthenes [vol. ii containing Aeschines' Against Ctesiphon and Dinarchus' Against Demosthenes], tr. T. Leland , 2 vols., London, 1819 · Minor Attic Orators I: Antiphon and Andocides , tr. K. J. Maidment , Cambridge, Mass., 1941 [Loeb] · The Murder of Herodes [containing Antiphon 1 and 5, Lysias 1, 3–4, 7–8, 12, 23–4, 32, Isaeus 8, Demosthenes 54–5, 59], tr. K. Freeman , London, 1946 · Minor Attic Orators II: Lycurgus, Dinarchus, Demades, Hyperides , tr. J. O. Burtt , Cambridge, Mass., 1954 [Loeb] · Greek Orations ...

Didymus

Didymus (1) (1st cent. bc)   Reference library

John Francis Lockwood, Robert Browning, and Nigel Guy Wilson

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
448 words

...(1) , Aeschylus , Sophocles (1) , Ion (2) , Euripides , Achaeus (3) , Cratinus , Aristophanes ( 1 ) , Phrynichus (1) , Eupolis , Menander (1) , Thucydides ( 2 ) , Antiphon ( 1 ) , Isaeus (1) , Isocrates , Aeschines (1) , Demosthenes (2) , Hyperides , Dinarchus . Much of the oldest material in the scholia to Pindar, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes is ultimately derived from Didymus. A papyrus fragment of his commentary on Demosthenes' Philippics illustrates his compilatory method; the quality of the discussion leaves a great...

Dionysius (7)

Dionysius (7) (of *Halicarnassus)   Reference library

Donald Andrew Frank Moore Russell

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
537 words

...prefaced by a programmatic statement of distaste for ‘Asianic’ rhetoric ( see Asianism and Atticism ), hope for an ‘Attic’ revival, and the writer's consciousness that this happy change is due to the good taste of the Roman governing class; (3) a group of occasional works: On Dinarchus , On Thucydides ( 2 ) (important), two letters to Ammaeus (one on Demosthenes' alleged indebtedness to Aristotle, the other on Thucydides (2)), and a letter to Cn. Pompeius on Plato ( 1 ) , of whose ‘dithyrambic’ style Dionysius was very critical; (4) On Arrangement of...

Lysias

Lysias   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
439 words

...citizenship to all those who had assisted in the restoration, but this grant was promptly annulled as unconstitutional. Works Modern editions contain 34 numbered speeches, although the titles of about 130 others are known. After 403 , like his fellow metics Isaeus and Dinarchus , Lysias composed speeches for litigants to deliver in court; but his versatility was great. Like Demosthenes (2) and Hyperides , he wrote for both public and private cases. The two categories, however, are not formally distinguished in the collection, where few private...

Dionysius of Halicarnassus

Dionysius of Halicarnassus (c.60 bce–c.7 bce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
598 words

...validity of his criticism. He believed in a connection between good literary taste (Atticism) and the moral exercise of power; the epochal turn to Atticism he credited primarily to the Roman conquest of the East. Dionysius’ essays on Lysias, Isocrates, Isaeus, Demosthenes, and Dinarchus are extant; those on Hyperides and Aeschines are not. He ranks Thucydides a better historian than Herodotus, and, startlingly, he offers extensive quotations that change Herodotus’ original Ionic Greek into Attic, a sign of the depth of his commitment to Atticism. His analyses...

Hyperides

Hyperides (389–322 BC)   Reference library

George Law Cawkwell

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
702 words

...(2007), 1–4; Against Diondas , C. Carey and others, ZPE 165 (2008), 1–19 (text, Eng. tr. and comm.). Commentaries, D. Whitehead (2000) speeches 1–5; J. Hermann (2009), speech 6 ( funeral oration ); Against Diondas , C. Carey and others: see above. Eng Tr. and Notes (with Dinarchus and Lycurgus, in series ed. M. Gagarin): I. Worthington, C. Cooper and E. M. Harris (2001). Special studies D. Gromska , De Sermone Hyperidis (1927); U. Pohle , Die Sprache des H. in ihren Beziehung zur Koine (1928); G. Bartolini , Iperide: Rassegna di problemi e di studi...

View: