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Didymus the Blind

Subject: Religion

(c.313–98), Alexandrian theologian. He was a staunch Nicene in trinitarian theology, but he was condemned as an Origenist at the Council of Constantinople in 553, and much of ...

Didymus the Blind

Didymus the Blind (c.313–398)   Reference library

George Demacopoulos

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... the Blind ( c .313–398 ) Theologian , biblical writer , and teacher from Alexandria . Though blind at an early age, Didymus was renowned for his erudition and served as the director of the famous catechetical school in Alexandria. Both Jerome and Rufinus attest to Didymus’ presence at the school and list him as their teacher. Rufinus claims that Didymus was appointed to his position by Athanasius . Didymus followed Athanasius in his Trinitarian theology, arguing for the consubstantiality of the Father and Son in his On the Trinity . Another...

Didymus the Blind

Didymus the Blind (c.313–98)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
137 words

... the Blind ( c. 313–98 ), Alexandrian theologian . He was a staunch Nicene in trinitarian theology, but he was condemned as an Origenist at the Council of Constantinople in 553, and much of his vast literary output has perished. His ‘On the Holy Spirit’ (in Jerome ’s translation), ‘Against the Manichees’ (in a mutilated text), and fragments of exegesis have long been known; ‘On the Trinity’ has been attributed to him since the 18th cent., but this ascription is now challenged. Books 4 and 5 of St Basil ’s Contra Eunomium are sometimes...

Didymus the Blind

Didymus the Blind (313–98)   Reference library

John Behr

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
718 words

... (Graecitas Christianorum Primaeva, 6; Nijmegen, 1977). W. M. Hayes , SJ, ‘Didymus the Blind is the Author of Adversus Eunomium IV/V’, in E. A. Livingstone (ed.), Studia Patristica , 17 (Oxford, 1982), 1108–14, with survey of earlier lit. A. Louth in CHECL (2004), 280f. R. A. Layton , Didymus the Blind and his Circle in Late-Antique Alexandria: Virtue and Narrative in Biblical Scholarship (Urbana, Ill., 2004). G. D. Bayliss , The Vision of Didymus the Blind: A Fourth-Century Origenism (Oxford,...

Didymus the Blind

Didymus the Blind  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(c.313–98), Alexandrian theologian. He was a staunch Nicene in trinitarian theology, but he was condemned as an Origenist at the Council of Constantinople in 553, and much of his vast literary output ...
John

John   Reference library

René Kieffer and René Kieffer

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
52,850 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in Didymus' commentary on Eccl 7:21–2 . The style reminds us of Luke and the story may be compared with Lk 7:36–50 . It could be called a biographical apophthegm, in which a saying of Jesus has been developed into the story of a woman caught in adultery. Just as in the Synoptic Gospels, here Jesus does not reject the law directly but criticizes those who apply it mechanically. The law must be interpreted in the light of God's mercy for sinners. ( 7:53–8:11 ) Jesus teaches in the temple as he does every day in Luke ( Lk 19:47; 20:1; 21:37 ). He goes to the...

Extra-canonical early Christian literature

Extra-canonical early Christian literature   Reference library

J. K. Elliott and J. K. Elliott

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
30,133 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and Didymus, Exp. in Ps. 88.8, also know this saying. Its antithetical parallelism and Semitic structure speak highly in favour of its originality. Logion 97: ‘Jesus said, “The kingdom of the [Father] is like a woman who was carrying a jar which was full of meal. While she was walking on a long road the handle of the jar broke; the meal spilled out behind her on to the road. She did not notice it; she was unaware of the accident. When she came to her house she put the jar down and found it was empty.”’ The precise meaning is unclear, possibly because the...

Alexandrian School

Alexandrian School  

The school of Platonism coupled with Christian elements that flourished in Alexandria for the two centuries before the city was captured by Arabs in 642. Its most famous member was Hypatia.
Catechetical School of Alexandria

Catechetical School of Alexandria  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A Christian school in Alexandria, concerned with advanced teaching in theology and with a succession of teachers in charge from the 2nd to the 4th cent., is depicted by Philip Sidetes (5th cent.) ...
Rufinus

Rufinus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(fl. 399–401?), commonly called the Syrian, author of a Liber de Fide, described in the only known MS as the work of Rufinus, priest of the province of Palestine. The fact that this work is hostile ...
St John

St John  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Apostle. According to tradition, the author of the Fourth Gospel, of Revelation, and of three of the Catholic Epistles. Together with his brother St James and St Peter, he belonged to the inner group ...
Acts of the Apostles

Acts of the Apostles  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A New Testament book immediately following the Gospels and relating the history of the early Church, and in particular the missionary journeys of St Paul and others.
Tura manuscripts

Tura manuscripts   Reference library

Alain Delattre

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...manuscripts Collection of Greek manuscripts discovered by chance in 1941 in the stone quarries of Tura, near Cairo. At least eight codices were found, but the quires were sold separately and dispersed into various collections. The manuscripts date from the 6th–7th century and include new works of two Alexandrian theologians: treatises of Origen and commentaries of Didymus the Blind on several books of the Bible. Alain Delattre L. Doutreleau , ‘Que savons-nous aujourd’hui des papyrus de Toura?’, RSR 43 (1955), 161–93. L. Koenen and L....

Epiphanius Scholasticus

Epiphanius Scholasticus (6th cent.)   Reference library

Brian Croke

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... ( 6th cent. ) Monastic colleague of Cassiodorus at Vivarium who translated from Greek to Latin the church histories of Socrates , Sozomen , and Theodoret which Cassiodorus used in writing his Historia Tripartita . Other works translated by Epiphanius included a commentary by Didymus the Blind on the Seven Catholic Epistles, a commentary by Philo of Carpasia (4th cent.) on the Song of Songs , and a collection of documents related to the Council of Chalcedon ( Codex Encyclius ). Brian Croke PLRE III, Epiphanius 1. PCBE II, Epiphanius...

Rufinus, Tyrannius

Rufinus, Tyrannius (c.345–411)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
188 words

... under Didymus the Blind . In 381 he was in Jerusalem . He had a part in founding a double monastery on the Mount of Olives . He returned to Italy in 397. Though he was also an original writer, Rufinus is important mainly as a translator of Greek theological works into Latin at a time when knowledge of Greek was declining in the W. His free rendering of Origen 's De Principiis , the only complete text now surviving, was intended to vindicate Origen's orthodoxy. It involved Rufinus in bitter controversy with St Jerome who criticized the tendentious...

Rufinus

Rufinus (2)(of *Aquileia)   Reference library

C. P. Bammel

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
260 words

...371 , studied in Egypt for eight years under Didymus the Blind and desert hermits, presided over a monastery on the Mount of Olives, and from 393 onwards became involved in the Origenist controversy ( see origen ( 1 ) ), returning to Italy in 397 . He there produced many translations or adaptations from the Greek, including *Eusebius' Church History , which he extended to 395 by adding two extra books; also Origen's De Principiis , commentaries on the Song of Songs and on Romans, and numerous homilies, the Clementine Recognitions , selected sermons of...

Didymos the Blind

Didymos the Blind   Reference library

Barry Baldwin

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
279 words

...of the so-called apokatastasis , i.e., the ultimate salvation of all rational creatures—men, angels, and demons). ed. PG 39:131–1818. De Trinitate , ed. J. Hönscheid , I. Seiler , 2 vols., with Germ tr. (Meisenheim an Glan 1975). Tura papyri—ed. in Papyrologische Texte und Abhandlungen, vols. 1–4, 6–9, 12f, 16, 22, 24–26, 33:1 (Bonn 1968–85), with Germ. tr. To complete list, see CPG 2:2544–72. B.D. Ehrman , Didymus the Blind and the Text of the Gospels (Atlanta, Ga., 1987). J. Tigcheler , Didyme l'Aveugle et l'exégèse allégorique (Nijmegen...

Palladius and the Lausiac History

Palladius and the Lausiac History   Reference library

J. William Harmless

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...and the Lausiac History (d. c. 431 ) Bishop , monastic biographer. A native of Galatia , Palladius went to Egypt c. 388 , studying initially with Didymus the Blind in Alexandria , then becoming a monk in the desert monasteries of Nitria and Kellia where he spent nine years as a disciple of Evagrius Ponticus . He left Egypt around 400, probably because of the Origenist controversy. He was ordained Bishop of Helenopolis in Bithynia by John Chrysostom . After John’s downfall, he went to Rome and lobbied on John’s behalf. In 406...

Jude, Epistle of St

Jude, Epistle of St   Reference library

Edward Youansamouth and Justin Mihoc

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
471 words

...and literary style indicates a Gk-speaking author, probably a Hellenistic Jew. The striking similarities between the Ep. of Jude and 2 Peter are most probably due to the use made of it by the latter. Patristic commentaries on Jude were written by Clement of Alexandria (2nd cent.), Didymus the Blind (4th cent.), Hilary of Arles (5th cent.), Bede (8th cent.), Oecumenius (10th cent.), and Theophylact of Ohrid (11th cent.), and a few catenae by others are also extant. Edward Youansamouth and Justin Mihoc Modern comm. by C. Bigg (ICC, with 1–2 Pet., 1901,...

Thomas

Thomas   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
597 words

.... Called Didymus (=the twin) in the Gospel of John but mentioned by all the evangelists, Thomas was impulsive enough to offer to die with Jesus on the way to Bethany, but dubious both about where Christ was going and the way there (  John 11: 16 and 14: 5). Above all he is remembered as the apostle who refused to believe in the Resurrection unless he actually touched the wounds of the risen Christ ( John 20: 25–8), an attitude for which the Fathers both blamed him for his lack of faith, and thanked him for his scepticism. This was the occasion for...

Catechetical School of Alexandria

Catechetical School of Alexandria   Reference library

David Gwynn

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
404 words

...the first head before Pantaenus as Athenagoras (whom he dates to the early 2nd cent.). This vision of a structured school with a defined teaching succession seems to be inspired by classical models (e.g. the Platonic Academy in Athens or the Museum in Alexandria). It is probable that Pantaenus and Clement were actually private teachers, while the more sophisticated instruction provided by Origen may not have survived his conflict with Bp Demetrius, which led to Origen’s retirement to Caesarea in 231. Acc. to Rufinus , Didymus the Blind was...

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