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Danjūrō family

The Ichikawa family, whose senior actor usually took the stage name Danjūrō, was the dominant kabuki acting family in Edo (Tokyo) from the 1690s until the twentieth century. Danjūrō I ... ...

Danjūrō family

Danjūrō family   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
348 words

... family The Ichikawa family, whose senior actor usually took the stage name Danjūrō, was the dominant *kabuki acting family in Edo (Tokyo) from the 1690s until the twentieth century. Danjūrō I ( 1660–1704 ) is credited with inventing the bravura *acting style known as aragoto in which heroic men or deities engage in wild acts of superhuman strength. He wrote many of the plays he starred in. A dedicated artist and devoted family man, Danjūrō was nonetheless partial to alcohol and bisexual love affairs; a devout believer in his gods, he also emulated...

Danjūrō family

Danjūrō family   Reference library

Laurence Kominz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
442 words

... family The Ichikawa family , whose senior actor usually took the stage name Danjūrō, was the dominant kabuki acting family in Edo ( Tokyo ) from the 1690s until the twentieth century. Other Ichikawa family stage names include Ebizō and Shinnosuke. Danjūrō I ( 1660–1704 ) is credited with inventing the bravura acting style known as aragoto . In aragoto roles heroic men, and sometimes deities, engage in wild acts of superhuman strength. Danjūrō took his inspiration from puppet theatre , Buddhist statuary, sutra chanting, and energetic religious ...

Danjūrō family

Danjūrō family  

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Overview Page
The Ichikawa family, whose senior actor usually took the stage name Danjūrō, was the dominant kabuki acting family in Edo (Tokyo) from the 1690s until the twentieth century. Danjūrō I ...
Ichikawa Danjūrō IX

Ichikawa Danjūrō IX  

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(1838–1903)*Kabuki actor, the fifth son of Danjūrō VII and the leader of kabuki during the Meiji Period (1868–1912) in the transition from feudal to modern Japan. An actor impressive ...
Tokyo

Tokyo  

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Japan's capital and largest city, situated on the central Pacific coast of Honshu Island, at the head of Tokyo Bay. Settlement dates back to about 10,000 bc, and a village ...
kabuki

kabuki  

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Overview Page
Japanese form of dance theatre dating back to the 16th century. Kabuki means song, dance, and acting, although the term originally meant shocking or strange, in reference to the form's unusual style. ...
Ichikawa Danjūrō IX

Ichikawa Danjūrō IX   Reference library

Laurence Kominz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
177 words

...Danjūrō IX ( 1838–1903 ) Kabuki actor, the fifth son of Danjūrō VII ( see Danjūrō family ) and the leader of kabuki during the Meiji Period ( 1868–1912 ) in the transition from feudal to modern Japan . An actor impressive in both voice and stature, he played a wide range of roles. In early Meiji he became a leader of kabuki reform, particularly with the Living History Play movement, for which he applied notions of psychological realism to the interpretation of characters . Later he and Onoe Kikūgorō V formed a popular acting combination and in...

Ichikawa Danjūrō IX

Ichikawa Danjūrō IX   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
173 words

...first kabuki plays to be seen by an emperor, part of Danjūrō's campaign to improve the social status of the art. From the late 1880s he emerged as a leader of a conservative movement, successfully preserving the authority of old families over upstart actors. When Living History Plays proved unpopular Danjūrō returned to the classics and enjoyed great success in both *dance pieces and dramatic plays, establishing his own ‘New Eighteen Great Plays’. Laurence...

Ichikawa Danjūrō

Ichikawa Danjūrō   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
2,280 words

... by the imperial family, an event of great significance in raising the social status of kabuki actors. In 1888 , Danjūrō IX became zagashira at the Kabuki-za, Japan's prestigious new playhouse. He and Onoe Kikugorō V acted there together in many of the old plays and dances, and classic kabuki witnessed a glorious revival. Danjūrō IX established his own play anthology, the Shin Kabuki Jūhachiban , containing more than thirty plays. Ichikawa Danjūrō X (born 31 May 1882 in Tokyo, died 1 February 1956 in Tokyo), the husband of Danjūrō IX's daughter,...

Onoe Kikugorō

Onoe Kikugorō   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
1,353 words

...IV , who often became his co-star. In 1863 , he became Ichimura Kakitsu IV and attained the name Onoe Kikugorō V in 1868 . It was not long before he, Ichikawa Danjūrō IX , and Ichikawa Sadanji I became the three greatest Meiji period ( 1868–1912 ) stars, known collectively as Dan-Kiku-Sa. Kikugorō, however, was opposed to the pedantic “living history” (katsureki) plays being done by Danjūrō IX, and they did not act together for several years. In 1878 the two were reconciled when they played together at the first kabuki performance ever given before...

kabuki

kabuki   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,182 words

...by actors. In 1832 Ichikawa *Danjūrō VII ( 1791–1859 ) canonized his family's aragoto kabuki heritage by publicizing the ‘Eighteen Great Plays’, inspiring others to do the same with their family acting traditions. In 1840 he devised a new genre of dance-drama based on nō and *kyōgen plays; the first and most popular of these is the aragoto classic The Subscription List . In 1840 the central government ordered Edo's theatres torn down and relocated to a north-eastern suburb and in 1842 it banished Danjūrō VII from Edo for infraction of...

kabuki

kabuki   Reference library

Laurence Kominz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,283 words

...by actors. In 1832 Ichikawa Danjūrō VII ( 1791–1859 ) canonized his family 's aragoto kabuki heritage by publicizing the ‘Eighteen Great Plays’, inspiring others to do the same with their family acting traditions. In 1840 he devised a new genre of dance-drama based on nō and kyōgen plays; the first and most popular of these is the aragoto classic The Subscription List . In 1840 the central government ordered Edo's theatres torn down and relocated to a north-eastern suburb and in 1842 it banished Danjūrō VII from Edo for infraction of...

Ichikawa Ennosuke

Ichikawa Ennosuke   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
884 words

...and special-effects tradition called keren , which he handed on to his descendants. Much of his career was spent in the minor theaters called koshibai , traditionally looked down upon by the major-theater actors. He was excommunicated for years from the family of his master, Ichikawa Danjūrō IX , for this breach of etiquette, although he was eventually forgiven and was influential in the ultimate abandonment of official and nonofficial discrimination against koshibai actors. Ichikawa Ennosuke II (born 21 May 1888 in Tokyo, died 12 June 1963 in...

Japanese Traditional Schools

Japanese Traditional Schools   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
878 words

...in the Ichikawa Danjūrō line; the Matsumoto Ryū , dominated by actors in the Matsumoto Kōshirō line; the Nakamura Ryū , headed by actors associated with the Nakamura family and divided into three main branches; the Ichiyama Ryū , whose once-powerful theater connections have dwindled; the Wakayagi Ryū ; the Onoe Ryū ; the Saruwaka Ryū; and the Tachibana Ryū. [For general discussion, see Kabuki Theater . See also Azuma Tokuho , Kataoka Takao , Matsumoto Kōshirō , and the entries under the following kabuki lineages and family names: Bandō , ...

Kabuki Theater

Kabuki Theater   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
2,803 words

...known for his contributions to the emerging rival performance form, bunraku , puppet theater. Outstanding actors soon specialized in kabuki , and their skill and technique became the basis for acting methods still seen today. In Edo, the capital, Ichikawa Danjūrō I ( 1660–1704 ) founded both a family line and a specialized kabuki dramatic form—the superhuman, exaggerated, heroic theatrical style called aragoto (meaning “rough business”). Sakata Tōjūrō ( 1647–1709 ) of the Kyoto-Osaka area exemplified a subtle, more realistic style known as wagoto ....

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