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Dagda

Subject: Religion

Europe Literal meaning: ‘the good god’. The ancient Irish deity of life and death; with one end of his staff he could kill nine men, but with the other end he restored them to ...

Dagda

Dagda   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

... The Dagda (the “Good One”) is the father god of Irish mythology. Cognates would probably have been two other Celtic deities, the Gaulish Dis Pater and the Gaulish and British Cernunnos . The patron of druidry , the Dagda wields a gigantic club, which he carries about on wheels. He uses one end of the club to punish, the other to heal. The Dagda had a magic cauldron that had an endless supply of food. After the defeat of the Tuatha Dé Danaan by the Milesians, the Dagda arranged for his people to live in mounds called sidhes . After a while...

Dagda

Dagda   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... , Dagda Mór , Daghda , Dagdae , Daghdha [Ir. dag , good; día , god (?)]. A leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann and one of the principal gods of Old Irish tradition; often cited with the definite article, the Dagda; also known as Eochaid Ollathair [father of all], Ruad Rofhessa [lord of great knowledge], and Deirgderc [red eye, i.e. the sun]. Sometimes, though not usually, seen as the son of Eithne (1) , who was also the mother of Lug Lámfhota . The Dagda was proclaimed as the ‘Good God’, not for moral import, but rather because he was good,...

Dagda

Dagda (Europe)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Europe Literal meaning: ‘the good god’. The ancient Irish deity of life and death; with one end of his staff he could kill nine men, but with the other end he restored them to life. Dagda was chief of the Tuatha De Danann, and a mighty aid to these mythical peoples at the Second Battle of Mag Tuired. He was Aed, ‘fire’; Ollathair, ‘all-father’; Ruad Rofessa, ‘lord of great knowledge’; and the god of druidism or magic, draidecht . Among his sacred possessions were an inexhaustible cauldron, two marvellous swine—one always roasting, the other always...

Dagda, the

Dagda, the   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

..., the . In Irish mythology, the head of the Tuatha Dé Danaan . He is the son of the earth goddess Dana 1 and the father of the Irish gods. He owns a magic harp that can produce the three types of music, goltraí , geantraí and suantraí , inducing sorrow, laughter and sleep respectively, the last helping him to subdue his chief adversaries, the Fomorians . In later versions of the tales he seems to degenerate into a buffoon, appearing as a fat blunderer at the second battle of Magh Tuireadh (Moytura) but possessing a magic cauldron of limitless food...

Dagda

Dagda  

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Subject:
Religion
EuropeLiteral meaning: ‘the good god’. The ancient Irish deity of life and death; with one end of his staff he could kill nine men, but with the other end he restored them to life. Dagda was chief of ...
Cridenbél

Cridenbél  

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Religion
An ugly, blind satirist in the household of the Dagda, as described in Cath Maige Tuired [The (Second) Battle of Mag Tuired]. When Cridenbél demands the three best bits of Dagda's food, the ruler's ...
Murias

Murias  

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Religion
One of the four great cities of the Tuatha Dé Danann, from whence came the great cauldron of the Dagda.
Ruad Rofhessa

Ruad Rofhessa  

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Religion
Another name for the Dagda.
Ainge

Ainge  

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Religion
A daughter of the Dagda. When twigs Ainge was gathering were stolen by Gaible, son of Nuadu, they became a forest springing up in every direction.
Deirgderc

Deirgderc  

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[Ir., red eye].An alternate name and epithet for both the Dagda and Eochaid (1), the sun-god.
Aonghus

Aonghus  

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Religion
Aonghus Og (Oenghus), son of the Dagda and Boann, and foster father to Diarmuid, was the beautiful love god of Irish mythology. Many stories are told of him. In one ...
Áed Minbhrec

Áed Minbhrec  

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A son of the Dagda and a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Wrongly accused of adultery by a jealous husband, Áed Minibhrec was murdered before his father's eyes. His sídh was near Ballyshannon, Co. ...
Cermait

Cermait  

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[Ir., honey-mouthed].Son of the Dagda killed by Lug Lámfhota for his sexual transgressions with Lug's wife. Cermait's son Mac Cuill later avenged his father by spearing Lug.2. A name given to Ogma, a ...
Bríg,

Bríg,  

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[Ir., high, noble, power (?)].A daughter of the Dagda whose son Rúadán is killed by Goibniu. In her grief she gives the first mourning chant or keen [Ir. caoineadh] in Ireland.
Eochaid Ollathair

Eochaid Ollathair  

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[Ir., all-father, father of all].Alternate name, in certain circumstances, for the Dagda. Some imaginative genealogists have traced family pedigrees back to Eochaid Ollathair, just as they did with ...
Ethal Anbúail

Ethal Anbúail  

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Religion
A Connacht leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann whose sídh was at Úaman; best remembered as the father of Cáer, whom Angus Óg loved. In different versions of the courtship, various divinities come to ...
Indech

Indech  

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Fomorian warrior, son of Domnu, who met misfortune at the Second Battle of Mag Tuired [Cath Maige Tuired]. In one version his blood and vitality are drained away from him by Mórrígan before the ...
Cauldron of Plenty

Cauldron of Plenty  

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Religion
The Dagda, the father god of the Irish Tuatha Dé Danaan, possessed a magic cauldron that produced endless food. Another magic cauldron is taken by the hero Cuchulainn from a ...
Corleck Hill

Corleck Hill  

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Religion
Sometimes known in Irish as Sliabh na Trí nDée, Sliabh na nDée Dána [Ir., hill of the three gods], a promontory near Drumeague, Co. Cavan, once known as ‘the pulse of Ireland’. A stone head of Brigit ...
Bodb

Bodb  

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Religion
Usually with the agnomen Derg, Dearg [Ir., Bodb the red]. A son (sometimes brother) of the Dagda and his successor as leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Bodb is described as having two residences, at ...

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