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Cyclopes

Subject: Religion

Are one‐eyed giants. In Homer they are savage and pastoral, and live in a distant country without government or laws. Odysseus visits them in his wanderings and enters the cave of one of ...

Cyclopes

Cyclopes (Europe)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Europe Literally, ‘circle-eyed’. The one-eyed giants of Greek mythology. Hesiod in his Theogony , composed soon after 700 bc , claimed that they gave to Zeus his special weapons, thunder and lightning. In the Odyssey , at least 150 years earlier, Homer had described the Cyclopes as ‘overbearing and lawless’; they were ferocious pastoralists, given to cannibalism. Odysseus came up against their brutish leader Polyphemus, the son of Poseidon, in his cave near Mount Aetna in Sicily. By blinding the one-eyed giant in his drunken sleep with a brand,...

Cyclopes

Cyclopes   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
44 words

... In Greek mythology, three demons, each having one eye in the centre of its forehead, who forged the thunderbolts of Zeus . They were depicted by Homer as giant herdsmen living on an island. Odysseus escaped from the cannabalistic Cyclops Polyphemus by blinding...

Cyclōpĕs

Cyclōpĕs   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
209 words

... are one‐eyed giants. In Homer they are savage and pastoral, and live in a distant country without government or laws. Odysseus visits them in his wanderings and enters the cave of one of them, Polyphēmus, who imprisons him and his men and eats two of them raw, morning and evening, until they escape by blinding him while he is in a drunken sleep, and getting out among the sheep and goats when he opens the cave in the morning. Polyphemus is the son of Poseidon , and the god, in answer to his prayer for vengeance, opposes the homecoming of Odysseus in...

Cyclopes

Cyclopes   Reference library

Richard A. S. Seaford

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
307 words

... ( Κύκλωπες ) are one-eyed giants. In Homer they are savage and pastoral, and live in a distant country without government or laws. Here Odysseus visits them in his wanderings and enters the cave of one of them, Polyphemus, who imprisons him and his men and eats two of them raw, morning and evening, until they escape by blinding him while in a drunken sleep, and getting out among the sheep and goats when he opens the cave in the morning ( Od. 9). Polyphemus is the son of Poseidon , and the god, in answer to his prayer for vengeance, opposes the...

Cȳclō'pēs

Cȳclō'pēs   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
106 words

... (sing. Cyclops , ‘Round-Eyed’) According to Homer, one-eyed giants, living a pastoral life on a distant island without government or laws. Odysseus visited the cave of one of them, Polyphemus . In Hesiod they were the sons of Uranus (Heaven) and Gaia (Earth), three in number, called Brontes, Steropes, and Arges, who made the thunderbolts of Zeus and aided him in his war against the Titans . They often appear as Hephaestus' workmen, and were credited with the construction of ancient walls, such as those of Tiryns and Mycenae. In these cases they...

Cyclopes

Cyclopes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Are one‐eyed giants. In Homer they are savage and pastoral, and live in a distant country without government or laws. Odysseus visits them in his wanderings and enters the cave of one of them, ...
Telemus

Telemus  

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(Τήλεμος), in mythology, a prophet who foretold to Polyphemus the Cyclops that Odysseus would one day blind him; Odyssey 9. 507ff.Simon Hornblower
Amete

Amete  

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Subject:
Religion
Apollo was forced by Zeus to serve this king of Pherae in Thessaly as a punishment for his having killed the Cyclops. Later Admetus, with Apollo's help, succeeded in marrying Alcestis.[...]
Acrisius

Acrisius  

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In mythology, son of Abas, king of Argos (2), and his wife Aglaïa, father of Danaë and brother of Proetus. After Abas' death the two brothers quarrelled; in their warfare ...
Philoxenus

Philoxenus  

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(c. 435–380 bc),of Cythera, dithyrambic poet. He lived at the court of Dionysius (1) of Syracuse, who sent him to the quarries. Pherecrates (fr. 155. 26 Kassel-Austin) introduces him ...
Phorcys

Phorcys  

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In mythology, son of Nereus and Earth i.e. Gaia (Hesiod Theogonia 237). Marrying his sister Ceto, he became father of the Graeae and Gorgo (ibid. 270ff.). Other children are ascribed ...
Hylas

Hylas  

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In Greek mythology, a king's son taken as his companion on the expedition of the Argonauts by Hercules; he was drowned when a water-nymph who had fallen in love with him drew him into her fountain.
Myrmecophagoidea

Myrmecophagoidea  

; suborder Xenarthra, infra-order Pilosa)A superfamily that comprises the one family Myrmecophagidae, in which the snout is elongated, the extent of the elongation depending on the overall body size ...
Maron

Maron  

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In Homer's Odyssey son of Euanthes and priest of Apollo at Ismarus in Thrace (later to be called Maroneia). He gave Odysseus the wine with which he made Polyphemus drunk ...
Polyphemus

Polyphemus  

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Subject:
Religion
(Handel: Acis and Galatea). Bass. Giant in love with Galatea. Kills Acis. Aria: O ruddier than the cherry. Creator (1718) not traced.
Ouranos

Ouranos  

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Subject:
Religion
Ouranos (Uranos, Uranus) was the first of the Greek supreme deities, a personification of the sky. He coupled with the First Mother, Gaia, a personification of earth. With Gaia he ...
Uranus

Uranus  

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In Greek mythology, a personification of heaven or the sky, the most ancient of the Greek gods and first ruler of the universe. He was overthrown and castrated by his son Cronus.
Greek creation

Greek creation  

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Subject:
Religion
The Greek story of creation—essentially the “official” creation myth of the Olympian religion—is most fully told by Hesiod in his Theogony. Hesiod tells us that in the beginning there was ...
Galatea

Galatea  

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In Greek mythology, the name both of a sea nymph courted by the Cyclops Polyphemus, who in jealousy killed his rival Acis, and that given to the statue fashioned by Pygmalion and brought to life.
Kronos

Kronos  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
EuropeOr Cronos. In Greek mythology, Kronos was the Titan son of Gaia, earth, and Ouranos, sky. He emasculated his sky father and seized control of the world. Marrying his sister Rhea he followed the ...

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