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Ctesiphon

On the river Tigris, c. 96 km. (60 mi.) above Babylon, was a village garrisoned by Parthia from c.140 bc as an Asiatic stronghold opposite Hellenistic Seleuceia (1), becoming (from ... ...

Ctesiphon

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Daniel Potts and Matthew Canepa

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...the Tigris. Both the Jewish and the Christian populations of Ctesiphon were important. The Jewish exilarch represented Jewish interests at the Sasanian court and can therefore be assumed to have been frequently at Ctesiphon; but while there were certainly Jews living in Ctesiphon, the main centre of Jewish life was in Kokhe (Veh-Ardashir), on the opposite side of the Tigris. By the Sasanian period, however, the entire area of Seleucia, Kokhe, Vologesias (to the south), and Ctesiphon, with its suburban extensions in Aspanbar and Weh-Antiog-Husraw ...

Ctesiphon

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The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
1,950 words

...included important Christian, Jewish, and Zoroastrian communities. Ctesiphon was the birthplace of the catholicos Elisha, the archdeacon Mar Aba, and Rabbi Hiyya. Mani, the founder of the Manichaean sect, was educated but later crucified at Ctesiphon, and within the city there was a market frequented by local Jews. Heraclius attacked Ctesiphon In 627 , and a decade later an Arab army commanded by Sa'd ibn Abi Waqqas captured Ctesiphon and huge quantities of booty after first taking Veh Ardashir and fording the Tigris. Major monuments at this time included...

Ctesiphon

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Malcolm Andrew Richard Colledge and Josef Wiesehöfer

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
219 words

... , on the river Tigris, c. 96 km. (60 mi.) above Babylon , part of the city agglomeration al-Mada’in (together with Seleuceia , Veh Ardashir ). Originally, it was a village garrisoned by Parthia from c. 140 bc as an Asiatic stronghold opposite Hellenistic Seleuceia (1) , becoming (from c. 50 bc ?) a city and Arsacid residence within roughly circular walls. After Roman invasions ( ad 116 , 166 ) had damaged Ctesiphon but especially Seleuceia, Ctesiphon became Babylonia 's chief city, taken by Septimius Severus ( 197–8 ), on whose arch...

Ctesiphon

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New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
108 words

... • radon • Chalcedon • Proudhon • Mogadon • pteranodon • iguanodon • mastodon • chiffon • Ctesiphon • bouffant • balafon • Xenophon • Bellerophon • argon , Sargon • Dagon • woebegone • bygone • doggone , logon • dodecagon • Dijon • demijohn • ancon • archon • racon • Comecon • emoticon • stereopticon • icon • walk-on • neocon • Yukon • zircon • salon • Fablon • decathlon • Teflon • Dralon • Simplon • Babylon • papillon • propylon • epsilon • nylon • Orlon • eidolon , roll-on, Solon • mouflon • Ascalon • Ashqelon • echelon • Avalon • ...

Ctesiphon

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Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
52 words
Ctesiphon

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The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
41 words
Ctesiphon

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The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
44 words
Ctesiphon

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Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
42 words
Ctesiphon

Ctesiphon  

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Overview Page
On the river Tigris, c. 96 km. (60 mi.) above Babylon, was a village garrisoned by Parthia from c.140 bc as an Asiatic stronghold opposite Hellenistic Seleuceia (1), becoming (from ...
Ardashir I

Ardashir I  

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(d.ad 240)King of Persia (c.224–41). Ardashir overthrew the last Parthian king, Artabanus V, and reunited Persia. He founded the Sassanian empire, establishing its capital at Ctesiphon. He ...
Kavād-shīrūya

Kavād-shīrūya  

(Καβάδης Σιρόης), Persian king (Feb.–Sept.Oct. 628), died Ctesiphon from poison or in an epidemic.The son of Chosroes II, Kavād-Shīrūya connived to imprison and murder his father and immediately sent ...
Shahrbarāz

Shahrbarāz  

(Σαρβαραζα̑ς, lit. “Wild Boar of the Empire”), Persian general; Sasanian king (630); died Ctesiphon Apr. 630.In 606/7 he commanded the Persian invasion of Mesopotamia. Profiting from the unstable ...
Chosroes II

Chosroes II  

Or Khusrau II Parvēz (“the victorious”), the last of the “great kings” (from 590) of Sasanian Iran; died Ctesiphon 29 Feb. 628.Chosroes came to power after crushing the rebellion ...
Khosrau II

Khosrau II  

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Subject:
History
(died 628 ad)King of Persia (590–628) who succeeded to the throne after the deposition of his father, Hormidz. After being unseated by a coup, he accepted Byzantine aid to regain his throne in return ...
graphē paranomōn

graphē paranomōn  

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In Athens was a prosecution for the offence of proposing a decree or law which was contrary to an existing law in form or content. As soon as the accuser made a sworn statement that he intended to ...
Aeschines

Aeschines  

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(c.397–c.322 bc),Athenian orator whose exchanges with Demosthenes (2) in the courts in 343 and 330 provide much of the evidence for the relations of Athens and Macedon in the 340s and the 330s. His ...
Siege of Kut

Siege of Kut  

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Subject:
History
(December 1915–April 1916)Successful siege of the town of Kut-al-Amara, now in Iraq, by Turkish troops in World War I. Kut-al-Amara is on the River Tigris and was garrisoned by a British imperial ...
iwan

iwan  

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In Islamic architecture, a vaulted space used as an entrance, or, if closed at one end, a hall facing a court in a madrasa or mosque. From C11 four iwans disposed on axes on each side of a court ...
Mani

Mani  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
There are contradictions among the sources, but it appears that Mani (c.216–76) was born near Seleucia-Ctesiphon, the capital of the Persian Empire, and began teaching in 240. Opposition from the ...
Marcus Aurelius emperor

Marcus Aurelius emperor  

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Ad 161–80, was born in 121 and named Marcus Annius Verus. His homonymous grandfather, Marcus Annius Verus, from Ucubi (Espejo) in Baetica, consul for the third time in 126 and city prefect, a ...

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