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Cluny

A Benedictine monastery in eastern France, founded in 910 and introducing a period of monastic reform based on strict observance of the Benedictine Rule; the abbey was subject only to the ...

Cluny

Cluny   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
42 words

... . Benedictine ( Benedict ) abbey in Burgundy (France), founded in 909/10 . It became a centre of renewal in the Church and in monastic practice. During the 12th cent., the influence of Cluny began to decline, although the abbey itself survived until 1790...

Cluny

Cluny   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
129 words
Illustration(s):
2

...Musée du Farinier, Cluny abbey, France. Lauros/Giraudon/The Bridgeman Art Library Elizabeth Moore Willingham A. H. Bredero , Cluny et Cîteaux au douzième siècle (1985). K. J. Conant , Cluny: les églises et la maison du chef d’ordre (1968). G. Constable , Cluny from the Tenth to the Twelfth Centuries ...

Cluny

Cluny   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
100 words

... . Abbey founded in 909 by William the Pious , duke of Aquitaine, during the revival of Benedictine monasticism that marked the post‐Viking period. Its foundation charter, which placed it under the protection of the Apostolic See, guaranteed it independence of secular and episcopal control. Under a series of outstanding abbots, monks from Cluny reformed many other monasteries and federated them to the mother house. Cluniacs devoted themselves to intercessory prayer, advocated penitential pilgrimages (the Cluniac pope Urban II launched the First...

Cluny

Cluny   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
85 words

... By the early part of C12 the Benedictine abbey of Cluny in Burgundy (destroyed) had the largest Romanesque church in Europe, with double aisles , double transepts with apsidal chapels, an ambulatory with radiating chapels, and a huge barrel-vaulted nave . This type of plan, devised to permit more altars to be placed in chapels, proved influential. The double transept is known as the Cluniac transept. Conant ( 1979 ) ; Eschapasse ( 1963 ) ; J.Evans ( 1972...

Cluny

Cluny   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
167 words

... , Cluniacs . The monastery of Cluny, in Burgundy, was founded in 909/10 . The high standard of monastic observance from an early stage led to the adoption of its customs by other houses, old and new. The objects of the reform included a return to the strict Benedictine Rule, especially as expounded by St Benedict of Aniane, cultivation of personal spiritual life, stress on the choir office (which tended to grow to excessive length) and the splendour and solemnity of worship generally, with a corresponding reduction in manual labour. It seems clear...

Cluny

Cluny   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art and Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
1,132 words

...Cluny II became the model for many houses of the Order, and for the rebuilding of earlier churches. Though many have been destroyed, churches inspired by Cluny II include St-Étienne at Nevers (west of Bourges), built 1083–97 , which follows the scale and style of Cluny II with the new arrangement of the choir derived from Cluny III, with an apse ambulatory and radiating chapels; as well as La Charité-sur-Loire (N. of Nevers), of which only part survives, and Paray-le-Monial (N. of Roanne), of c . 1100 , the finest surviving daughter-house of Cluny. This...

cluny

cluny   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
2,061 words

...1985. M. Pacaut , L'Ordre de Cluny , Paris, 1986. D. Poeck , Cluniacensis Ecclesia . E. M. Wischerman , “Grundlagen einer cluniacensischen Bibliotheksgeschichte”, MMAS , 62, Munich, 1988. B. H. Rosenwein , To Be Neighbor of Saint Peter. The Social Meaning of Cluny's Property 909-1049 , Ithaca (NY), 1989. G. Melville , “ Cluny après ‘Cluny’. Le treizième siècle: un champ de recherche ”, Francia , 17, 1, 1990, 91-124. P. Racinet , Les Maisons de l'ordre de Cluny au Moyen Âge , Louvain-Brussels, 1990. D. Riche , L'Ordre de Cluny, de la mort de Pierre le...

lace., Cluny

lace., Cluny   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
53 words

...Cluny Type of lace developed in France in the late 19th century in Mirecourt (Lorraine) and Le Puy; the name derives from the origins of the style in late medieval laces in the collection of the Musée de Cluny in Paris. L. Paulis , Technique and Design of Cluny Lace (1921/ R Bedford,...

Cluny, Cluniacs

Cluny, Cluniacs   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,012 words

...Forschungen über Cluny und die Cluniacenser , ed. G. Tellenbach (Freiburg, 1959). H. E. J. Cowdrey , The Cluniacs and the Gregorian Reform (Oxford, 1970). M. Pacaut , L'Ordre de Cluny (909–1789) (1986). N. Hunt , Cluny under St Hugh, 1049–1109 (1967). K. J. Conant , Cluny: Les Églises et la Maison du Chef d'Ordre (Mâcon, 1968). N. Hunt (ed.), Cluniac Monasticism in the Central Middle Ages (1971). [M.] D. Knowles , OSB, The Monastic Order in England (1940; 2nd edn., 1963), esp. chs. 8 and 16. J. Wollasch , Cluny – ‘Licht der...

Bernard of Cluny

Bernard of Cluny   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
93 words

...of Cluny ( Morlas, Morval, Morlaix ) ( fl. 12th century) Monk at *Cluny during the time of *Peter the Venerable . His De contemptu mundi provides a satire against the moral disruption of the time. From the late medieval period onward, he was often confused with another Bernard and monk of Cluny who wrote the Consuetudines cluniacenses . Andrea Janelle Dickens Bernard of Cluny , De contemptu mundi by Bernard of Morval , ed. H. C. Hoskier (1929). G. J. Engelhardt , ‘The De contemptu mundi of Bernardus Morvalensis: A Study in Commonplace’,...

Bernard of Cluny

Bernard of Cluny (c.1100–c.1150)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
35 words

...of Cluny ( c. 1100– c. 1150 ), also called Bernard of Morlás or Morval. He was probably a Cluniac monk. His poem, De contemptu mundi , is the source of ‘Jerusalem the...

Cluny, Order of

Cluny, Order of   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
130 words

..., Order of A reformed Benedictine monastic order, whose mother house was the abbey of Cluny in France, founded by Duke William of Aquitaine in 909. Under Abbot Odilo (994–1048) Cluny became the head of a system of dependent “daughter houses” throughout western Europe. In the 11th and 12th centuries Cluny became a spiritual and cultural centre of vast influence; four of its members became popes and it inspired the zealous reforming innovations of Pope Gregory VII from 1073 . The monastery church at Cluny was a model for much ecclesiastical building in...

Hugh of Cluny

Hugh of Cluny (1024–1109)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
90 words

...of Cluny ( 1024–1109 ) A monk at 14, Hugh became a deacon at 18, a priest at 20, grand prior soon afterwards, and, finally, abbot at age 24—an office held for 60 years, assuring the supremacy of the *Cluniac network. A close adviser to *Pope Gregory VII , he also participated in three ecclesiastical *councils (Rome, 1059 and 1063 ; *Rheims , 1049 ), and presided over the Synod of *Toulouse . Michelle M. Sauer N. Hunt , Cluny under Saint Hugh, 1049–1109 (1968). ——  Cluniac Monasticism in the Central Middle Ages ...

Berno of Cluny

Berno of Cluny   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
236 words

...contemporary laxity caused by secular ownership of monasteries, Cluny abbey was founded in 910 by William of Aquitaine with Berno as its abbot. Features of this reform were a return to the ideals of Benedict of Nursia with both individual poverty and chastity prominent, and its independence safeguarded by the direct protection of the Holy See. Berno had been abbot at Gigny and Beaume and towards the end of his life was given three other abbeys. Cluny's influence became deep and widespread, not least in France, Italy, and England, where the 10th-century...

Odo of Cluny

Odo of Cluny   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
519 words

...own death and feast were on 18 (19) November. J. Mabillon , AA.SS. O.S.B. , v, 150–99. Life by John of Cluny with works ascribed to Odo in P.L. , cxxxiii. 105–854; G. Sitwell, St Odo of Cluny (1958), which includes tr. of John's Life and of the Life by Odo of Gerald of Aurillac, see also À Cluny (1950); N. Hunt, Cluny under St Hugh (1967); H. E. J. Cowdrey, The Cluniacs and the Gregorian Reform (1970); J. Leclercq, ‘Pour une histoire de la vie à Cluny’, R.H.E. , lvii (1962), 385–408 and 783–812; B. Hamilton, Monastic Reform: Catharism and the Crusades...

Odilo of Cluny

Odilo of Cluny (961–1049)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
425 words

...of Cluny ( 961–1049 ) St Odilo was born in 961 or 962 to an aristocratic family in the neighbourhood of Brioude, the Mercoeur. At first a canon of Saint-Julien de Brioude , he let himself be drawn to Cluny by Abbot Maiolus , one of whose most loyal disciples he became. Maiolus chose Odilo as coadjutor in 993 . The fifth abbot of Cluny ( 994–1049 ), Odilo left a decisive mark on the history of the monastery. It was under his government that Cluny acquired from Popes Gregory V ( 998 ) and John XIX ( 1024 ) the legal instruments of...

Maiolus of Cluny

Maiolus of Cluny (c.909–994)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
531 words

...by his successor, Odilo ( 994–1049 ), at a time when Cluny, thanks to the privileges of exemption delivered by Popes Gregory V ( 998 ) and John XIX ( 1024 ), was being established as an independent Church and needed, for this purpose, to have an abbatial figure to refer to. “ Maiolus ”, BHL , 2, 1900–1901, no. 5177-5187. D. Iogna-Prat , Agni immaculati. Recherches sur les sources hagiographiques relatives à saint Maïeul de Cluny (954-994) , Paris, 1988. F. Neiske , “Der Konvent des Klosters Cluny zur Zeit des Abtes Maiolus”, Vinculum Societatis....

Hugh of Cluny

Hugh of Cluny   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
453 words

...of Cluny ( 1024–1109 ), abbot . The eldest son of Dalmatius , count of Semur (near Autun), related to the dukes of Aquitaine and to several Burgundian noblemen, Hugh seemed destined to a notable worldly career. But he was both too studious and too clumsy as a youth to be a knight and, in defiance of his father's wishes, was professed as a monk at Cluny in c. 1040 . About four years later he was ordained priest. Promotion came very early, for Odilo , then abbot, appointed him as prior in 1048 . By then he had become tall and handsome, able and...

Odo of Cluny

Odo of Cluny (c.879–942)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
341 words

...Baume, Gigny, Déols, Massay and Cluny . By his testament of 926 , Berno entrusted the direction of the three latter monasteries to Odo. In a personal capacity, Odo was later called on to found or restore numerous monasteries in Burgundy , Aquitaine and Italy , in particular at Rome . Greatly attached to St Martin , he went to die near him at Tours, in Nov 942 , which explains why his cult long remained secondary at Cluny itself; not until the abbacy of Hugh of Semur ( 1049–1109 ) was Odo, second abbot of Cluny, who was henceforth seen as the...

Anastasius of Cluny

Anastasius of Cluny   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
180 words

...of Cluny ( d. 1085 ). Born at Venice, this learned man became a monk at Mont-St-Michel, but was critical of the supposed simony of the abbot, and left to become a hermit on Tombelaine (Normandy). About 1066 he was invited by Hugh of Cluny to join his community, then at the height of its fame. Sent by Pope Gregory VII to Spain on a liturgical mission in 1073 , he remained at Cluny until 1080 , when he again left the community to become a hermit, first in the Pyrenees and then near Toulouse, where he preached to the local peasants. His companion...

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