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Clean, Well-Lighted Place, A

Subject: Literature

Story by Hemingway, published in Winner Take Nothing. At a sidewalk table of a Spanish café an old, deaf man sits drinking brandy late at night as the two waiters discuss him, ...

Clean, Well-Lighted Place, A

Clean, Well-Lighted Place, A   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
62 words

..., Well-Lighted Place, A , story by Hemingway , published in Winner Take Nothing . At a sidewalk table of a Spanish café an old, deaf man sits drinking brandy late at night as the two waiters discuss him, the older one with sympathy because he too is lonely, fearful, confident of nothing, and also in need of the security of a clean, well-lighted place...

Clean, Well-Lighted Place, A

Clean, Well-Lighted Place, A  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Story by Hemingway, published in Winner Take Nothing.At a sidewalk table of a Spanish café an old, deaf man sits drinking brandy late at night as the two waiters discuss him, the older one with ...
Place-Names

Place-Names   Quick reference

Margaret Gelling

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,757 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...this immigration. Scientific place‐name study rendered the most extreme 19th‐century assumptions about the Anglo‐Saxon conquest of Britain untenable, but the result was a modification rather than a total rejection of the earlier view. The most influential of the scholars who were involved in the use of place‐name evidence before the 1960s were deeply committed to the ‘clean‐sweep’ theory, and argued strongly that the replacement of most of the British place‐names by English ones supported this. Because of the survival of some place‐names which are in the...

The Evolution and Devolution of Religious Knowledge

The Evolution and Devolution of Religious Knowledge   Reference library

Abdul-Karim Soroush

Liberal Islam: A Sourcebook

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
5,758 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...be explained in light of the expectations. Treating these questions requires a good deal of philosophy, politics, sociology, and history, and that is what gives the science of religion the flavor of the age. That also explains why the true ijtihad (rational adjudication) in disciplines such as fiqh [Islamic jurisprudence] cannot materialize unless a true ijtihad in first principles has taken place beforehand. This, in turn, shows why fiqh has been so stagnant in religious seminaries in recent centuries. Since fiqh is a “consumer”...

Leviticus

Leviticus   Reference library

Lester L. Grabbe and Lester L. Grabbe

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
22,756 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Cult of Molek: A Reassessment , JSOTSup 43 (Sheffield: JSOT). Houston, W. (1993), Purity and Monotheism: Clean and Unclean Animals in Biblical Law , JSOTSup 140 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press). Hübner, U. (1989), ‘Schweine, Schweineknochen und ein Speiseverbot im Alten Israel’, VT 39: 225–36. Hurvitz, A. (1982), A Linguistic Study of the Relationship between the Priestly Source and the Book of Ezekiel: A New Approach to an Old Problem , Cahiers de la Revue Biblique, 20 (Paris: Gabalda). ———(1988), ‘Dating the Priestly Source in Light of the...

In the Beginning: The Earliest History

In the Beginning: The Earliest History   Reference library

Michael D. Coogan

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
10,305 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...zones. Moving with the prevailing winds from west to east, first comes a coastal plain. In antiquity it was wetter than now, even swampy in places, so that the main route to and from Egypt skirted it, occasionally hugging the foothills to the east (the biblical Shephelah, or “lowland”). Along this route lay several of the major cities of ancient Palestine. Broad in the south, the coastal plain narrows as one moves north up the coast from Egypt, and the Shephelah tapers off as well, ending at the promontory of Mount Carmel, which juts into the sea at modern...

Zephaniah

Zephaniah   Reference library

Rex Mason and Rex Mason

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,468 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...abuses would not have existed after the clean-up described in 2 Kings 23:4–24 (e.g. Roberts 1991 : 163 ). We may suspect that the account of Josiah's reform has been somewhat exaggerated, especially in the light of the subsequent fierce attacks of Jeremiah and Ezekiel on the religious life of Judah. Even if that is so, however, it is true that the book would suit a general movement of unrest following the period of Assyrian domination in the time of Manasseh such as gave rise to the Deuteronomic reform movement. (For a brief survey of the history of the...

11 The Technologies of Print

11 The Technologies of Print   Reference library

James Mosley

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,250 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
8

...extract a loose piece of type, which was reinserted. For all these reasons, as well as the vagaries of human labour, the daily target of 2,500 impressions per press crew was seldom reached. The second side of the sheet was printed from another forme, made up within a chase that was the same size as the first one. A proof sheet was printed by placing the made-up forme on the press and pulling one or more impressions ( see proofs and proofreading ). To make corrections, it was necessary to loosen the quoins and thus to unlock the forme. If a passage needed...

Industrial History

Industrial History   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,499 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... spinning of cotton on machines that could be operated by minders rather than skilled workers. Six years later Arkwright was granted a second patent which mechanized the preparatory processes of opening and cleaning the cotton, carding, and the making of slivers and rovers for the spinning machines. His greatest achievement, however, was to place these machines in water‐powered mills, starting at Cromford in 1771 , with a ‘packaged’ system of production that was soon copied in many parts of northern England and Lowland Scotland. These new cotton mills...

Introduction to the Pentateuch

Introduction to the Pentateuch   Reference library

G. I. Davies

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
32,329 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...symbols for them as P-E-J-D (for a fuller account of the sources as later understood see sections c.7 and g ). Hupfeld's new ideas did not succeed in displacing the dominant Supplementary Hypothesis, at any rate not immediately. But some time before 1860 Ewald had recognized the existence of a second Elohist and the character of J and E as continuous sources—which places him very close to Hupfeld. A. Knobel, though less well-known, had reached similar conclusions independently of Hupfeld about the same time, and over a larger range of texts. His work is...

Utopianism

Utopianism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,929 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...have been removed from dwelling-places, leisure and education for all classes are the norm, and cultural activities are subsidized by the government. Cities are built to accord with principles of order and cleanliness, and with efficient sewers and provision of clean water. The monarchy is elective, hereditary titles have been abolished, and political partisanship is unknown. Prostitution has not been abolished, but women can enter many trades and professions, and wealthier classes take ‘the initiative in cultivating a healthier and higher tone of morality...

Tobit

Tobit   Reference library

Joseph A. Fitzmyer, SJ and Joseph A. Fitzmyer, SJ

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,111 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... 3.19.8–3.20.2). The storyteller uses ‘two days’ to imply a far-away place. v. 12 , ‘Why do you need to know’, heavenly messengers were reluctant to reveal their identity; cf. Gen 32:29 . v. 13 , ‘Azariah’, his name means, ‘YHWH has helped’, a covert identification of his role, which will be played out in the story; ‘son of … Hananiah’, the patronymic means, ‘YHWH has been gracious’. v. 14 , ‘Nathan’, a shortened form of Nathaniah, ‘YHWH has given’, a form found in some MSS; ‘Shemeliah’, probably a corrupted form of Shelemiah, Šelemyāh(û) , ‘YHWH has...

Essay with Commentary on Post-Biblical Jewish Literature

Essay with Commentary on Post-Biblical Jewish Literature   Reference library

Philip S. Alexander

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
48,106 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of light, and at its turning, when it retires to its appointed place; at the beginning of the (2) watches of darkness when he unlocks its storehouse and spreads it over the earth, and at its turning, when it retires before the light; when the heavenly lights (3) shine out from the abode of holiness, and when they retire to the dwelling of glory; at the commencement of the seasons on the days of the new moon, as well as at their turnings, when (4) one hands over to the other (when the seasons are renewed it is a great day for the Holy of Holies, and a s[ure]...

Mark

Mark   Reference library

C. M. Tuckett and C. M. Tuckett

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
44,701 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...light of the details of the passion narrative (a Jewish trial preceding a Roman trial, followed by a mockery involving spitting etc.). As before, the ‘Son of Man’ reference, and the inclusion of a prediction of ‘resurrection’, remain constant. v. 32 is a little obscure: how are the amazement and the fear related? And are there two groups of people intended here, or one? Jesus is ‘on the way’, ‘going ahead’ of his disciples. In one sense he is simply on a road, but in a deeper sense he is also on the ‘way’ that leads to Jerusalem which for Mark is the place...

Extra-canonical early Christian literature

Extra-canonical early Christian literature   Reference library

J. K. Elliott and J. K. Elliott

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
30,133 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the place of purification itself, and was walking in the temple. A Pharisee, a chief priest named Levi, met them and said to the Saviour, ‘Who gave you permission to walk in this place of purification and look upon these holy vessels when you have not bathed and your disciples have not washed their feet? But you have walked in this temple in a state of defilement, whereas no one else comes in or dares to view these holy vessels without having bathed and changed his clothes.’ Thereupon the Saviour stood with his disciples and answered him. ‘Are you then clean,...

Job

Job   Reference library

James L. Crenshaw and James L. Crenshaw

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
28,334 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...creation each day echoes Job's earlier curse ( 3:9 ) and complaint about reversals of dawn and darkness ( 24:13–17 ). In YHWH's graphic image, a personified dawn takes hold of earth's corners like a bedsheet and shakes out the wicked like bedbugs. Their natural fondness for darkness becomes a self-fulfilling curse, light being denied them and their strength being checked ( 38:15 ). In YHWH's world, the wicked have a place just like the good, but dawn limits their destructiveness. ( 38:16–21 ) Turning to the remote regions of the universe, YHWH asks Job about the...

Genesis

Genesis   Reference library

R. N. Whybray and R. N. Whybray

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
35,219 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...book. It defines Israel's place in the world of nations and links the human figures of the remote past with Abraham and his descendants by a series of genealogies. It also functions as a universal history of beginnings. It afforded the author the opportunity to state his belief that there is only one, supreme God and that he created the world with all its inhabitants. It is concerned with the nature of this God and with the nature of his human creatures. This universal history taught the Israelite readers a moral lesson as well as a theology: human beings are...

8 The Transmission of Jewish Knowledge through MSS and Printed Books

8 The Transmission of Jewish Knowledge through MSS and Printed Books   Reference library

Emile G. L. Schrijver

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,005 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the transmission of the text of the Babylonian Talmud. And yet, in the light of the relative quality of its Mishnaic text, it is hard to believe that the text of the Gemara as it appears in the only known complete medieval MS of its text represents anything else but one of Beit-Arié’s ‘re-creations of the copied text that may very well have distorted and transformed the original work’. In spite of the active copying by individuals, books were generally rare during the Jewish Middle Ages. As a result, scholars and students saw themselves forced to borrow books,...

John

John   Reference library

René Kieffer and René Kieffer

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
52,850 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the desert ( Ex 17:2 ) and the gift of water at Beer ( Num 21:16 ), which is celebrated by a famous song: ‘Spring up, O well! Sing to it’ ( Num 21:17 ). In the LXX and in the targums ‘Beer’ is considered as awell’ and not as a place. In the targums the place Mattanah is interpreted as ‘gift’. Therefore the targum Pseudo-Jonathan considers the well as God's gift. In the Dead Sea scrolls the well is a symbol of the law given to Israel (CD 6:4–11 ), whereas Philo considers it as an image of wisdom ( De ebrietate , 112–13; De somniis , 2.267–71). This is more...

Acts

Acts   Reference library

Loveday Alexander and Loveday Alexander

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
42,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...only ‘in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth’ can healing take place. There is a deliberate patterning on gospel healing stories here ( cf. Lk 5:23 ), and in both cases the play on words is almost certainly deliberate: Peter ‘raised’ ( ēgeiren, v. 7 ) the beggar to a new way of life as well as to new mobility. The crowd reaction ( v. 10 ) heightens the emotional impact of the miracle as well as its solid attestation: here is a whole crowd of witnesses to whom the lame beggar was well known ( cf. 3:16; 4:22 ). ( 3:11–26 ) ‘No Other Name’ Peter's second...

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