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clergy, Church of England

Subject: History

Eamon Duffy, The Voices of Morebath (2001), provides a vivid account of how the Reformation affected a remote parish on the edge of Dartmoor, seen largely through the writings of the local ...

Church of England

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
56 words

... of England . The Christian Church which is ‘by law established’ in England. The Church of England is a consequence of the Reformation, as this was mediated under the 16th-cent. Tudor sovereigns. As the expression of Anglicanism , it is the continuity of Christianity from the earliest times ( see e.g. CELTIC CHURCH ), as that changes through...

Church of England

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The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
74 words

... of England . The Church of England was created by a series of Acts of Parliament between 1529 and 1559 . Most of the clergy who had been parish priests before the Reformation remained in office and the medieval buildings which had long served as parish churches were simply adapted to the new liturgical requirements. Moreover, the Church of England was governed on similar lines to its Catholic predecessor, with two archbishops and 24...

Church of England

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
321 words

...of their representation in the General Synod. Territorially, the Church divides into two provinces, Canterbury and York. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the Primate of All England: the Archbishop of York the Primate of England. The overseas expansion of the Church of England, in line with the growth of the British Empire, resulted in the development of the worldwide Anglican Communion . The Church of England is the only part of the Anglican Communion still established by law as an official state Church. In 1992 , the General Synod voted in favour of the...

Church of England

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The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
465 words

... of England The Church of England was created by a series of Acts of Parliament between 1529 and 1559 ( see Reformation ). The Elizabethan Settlement of 1559 provided the framework for the Anglican Church (its alternative name) in succeeding centuries. The monarch replaced the Pope as the head of the Church of England, which became (and has remained) the official religion of the state: the Established Church. Most of the clergy who had been parish priests before the Reformation remained in office, and the medieval buildings which had long served as...

Church of England

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
219 words

...of Homilies ( 1547 , 1571 ), i.e. sermons to be read in churches; and the Authorized Version of the Bible ( 1611 ). Although Protestant in doctrine, the Church of England retained many Catholic features in its ceremonies and vestments and retained government by bishops, and it was regarded by Puritans as incompletely reformed. Its principles were strongly defended by Richard Hooker in Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Politie . During the Civil War many of the distinctive features of the Church of England were abolished by Parliament, but the church was...

Church of England

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The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
203 words

... of England Though there has been an organized church in England since the 4th century, the name refers to the institution established by law following Henry VIII 's breach with Rome in 1532 . The monarch became head of the church, the monasteries were dissolved and their wealth appropriated, and the authority of the papacy was repudiated. The church took its distinctive shape in the reign of Edward VI under the direction of Thomas Cranmer , with its own liturgy, The Book of Common Prayer ; Articles of Religion (originally Forty‐Two, the Thirty‐Nine...

Church of England

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The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
257 words

... of England The Church of England's unique status arises by virtue of the fact that it is the established church. Establishment is seen in the fact that the Archbishops of Canterbury and York, the Bishops of London, Durham, and Winchester, plus twenty‐one senior bishops of the Church sit in the House of Lords, the Sovereign is the head of the church as well as being head of state, and its ecclesiastical law and ecclesiastical courts form part of the English legal system. Moreover the creation of the Church is the result, at least in part, of legislative...

Church of England

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A Dictionary of Law (9 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
220 words

...Church of England The established Church in England, of which the sovereign is the supreme head. Structurally, the Church consists of the two provinces of Canterbury and York, which are divided into dioceses, and these into parishes. For each province there is an archbishop (that of Canterbury being Primate of All England, and that of York Primate of England), and for each diocese a bishop. A suffragan bishop has no diocese of his own but assists an archbishop or a diocesan bishop. The archbishops and other senior bishops are members of the House of Lords....

Church of England

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
4,103 words

... E. R. Wickham , Church and People in an Industrial City (1957). [W.] O. Chadwick , The Victorian Church (2 vols., 1966–70). R. Lloyd , The Church of England in the Twentieth Century (2 vols., 1946–50; rev. as The Church of England 1900–1965 ; 1966). A. Wilkinson , The Church of England and the First World War (1978). K. A. Thompson , Bureaucracy and Church Reform: The Organizational Response of the Church of England to Social Change 1800–1965 (Oxford, 1970). R. E. Rodes , Law and Modernization in the Church of England: Charles II to the...

Church of England

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Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
1,118 words

... of England . In 1750 , the position of the Church of England in British society was not entirely secure. The Toleration Act of 1689 , by authorizing Nonconformist worship, ended the church's legal monopoly of the nation's religious life. Even so, the Church of England was England's principal bastion of organized Christianity—and in that too lay some of the difficulties that assailed it in the eighteenth century. For Christianity itself was now far from commanding unquestioning support, and new literary and intellectual critiques amounted to a rationalist...

Church of England

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,006 words

... of England . The presence of British bishops at the Council of Arles in 314 is evidence of the existence of an organized Church. British Christians were driven into the western parts of Britain by the Anglo-Saxons, who were converted by Celtic missionaries from Ireland and Scotland , and by the mission of St Augustine of Canterbury sent from Rome (597). Unification and organization of the Anglo-Saxon Church was achieved under Theodore of Tarsus , who summoned national ecclesiastical councils, divided dioceses, and encouraged learning. After a...

Church of England

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
993 words

... of England . The established Church permeated every aspect of 19th-century life, and membership was a mark of social respectability. Apart from Roman Catholics, Nonconformists, and Jews, and one or two agnostics and atheists, Trollope 's characters regard themselves as members of the Church. He was himself steeped in the life of the Church of England. Both grandfathers had been clergymen, and his parents were practising Christians. His own faith is apparent in his essays in the Pall Mall Gazette , later published as Clergymen of the Church of England ,...

Church of England

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A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
751 words

...the established Church of England ( Ecclesia Anglicana ) can be said to exist. The Act of Supremacy ( 1534 ) declared Henry VIII to be ‘the only supreme head of the Church’ in place of the pope, which Elizabeth's Act ( 1559 ) moderated to the less offensive ‘Supreme Governor’. Apart from this the church remained legally and administratively much the same. The church courts and their penalties, diocesan administrative systems, the authority of bishops and archdeacons all continued. The non‐monastic cathedrals survived as before. Ecclesiastical law remained...

Church of England

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Revd Dr William M. Marshall

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,771 words

...with regular church-going at 7 per cent (Church of England 2.4 per cent, in all UK 2.9 per cent), but with 70 per cent believing in God, the ubiquitous church building in village or city, together with mosque, synagogue, and temple, is sacramental, a vital outward and visible sign of the spiritual dimension of man’s existence. Quite by chance in its creation as a ‘catholic and reformed’ national church, the Church of England happens to be pivotal between Roman catholic and eastern orthodox churches on the one hand and protestant reformed churches on the other....

Church of England

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Robert Newsom

Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
793 words

... of England . The established Church of England (officially ‘Protestant’ after 1689 , though even in Dickens's day some members objected to the term), into which Dickens was baptized and to which he belonged throughout his life, except for a brief interval in the 1840s when he attended unitarian chapels. The doctrines of the Church of England are defined by the Thirty-Nine Articles, which evolved over a period of years following Henry VIII's separation of the Church of England from the Church of Rome ( see Child's History of England, A ; Roman...

Church of England

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The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,092 words

...of the new district of Oxenhope, formerly part of Haworth parish. Mr Brontë was also a perpetual curate—the equivalent of a vicar, nominated by a lay rector (purchaser of the right to receive tithes) or by trustees, or appointed to a new district. His Irish birth was no obstacle to his ministry in England. The established (episcopal) Church of Ireland and the Church of England were linked by the Act of Union of 1800 as the United Church of England and Ireland. Thus he could enter Cambridge, graduate, and receive ordination. The ordinand's oath of...

Church of England

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Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
66 words

...Church of England The established Church of England and Scotland. The reigning King or Queen is constitutionally its Supreme Governor, appointing archbishops and bishops on the advice of the Prime Minister. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader of the Church, and primus inter pares . The Church in Northern Ireland and Wales has been disestablished (the Queen is no longer its head). See anglican church...

Free Church of England

Free Church of England   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
206 words

...Free Church of England . A small Protestant body which traces its beginnings to a dispute in 1843 between H. Phillpotts , Bp. of Exeter , and one of his clergy, James Shore , in charge of Bridgetown chapel-of-ease, Totnes. Shore's cause was taken up by T. E. Thoresby ( d. 1883 ), a Minister of the Countess of Huntingdon 's Connexion, and eventually in 1863 the Free Church of England received definite shape in association with the latter. It accepted the Thirty-Nine Articles and recognized the legitimacy of episcopacy, though its ministry at first...

Free Church of England

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
72 words

...Church of England . A small Protestant body which originated in a dispute in 1843 between H. Phillpotts , Bp. of Exeter, and one of his clergy, James Shore . It received definite shape in 1863 in association with the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion . In 1927 it united with the Reformed Episcopal Church, a similar group which had separated from the Episcopal Church in the United States of America in 1873...

clergy, Church of England

clergy, Church of England   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
620 words

...Church of England Eamon Duffy, The Voices of Morebath ( 2001 ), provides a vivid account of how the Reformation affected a remote parish on the edge of Dartmoor, seen largely through the writings of the local priest, Sir Christopher Trychay , who kept the parish accounts. The Reformation reduced the number of English clergy by about a half. The Church of England suffered a severe shortage of manpower until well into Elizabeth's reign, and many livings remained vacant. For a study of the situation in a leading city, see Martha C. Skeeters , ...

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