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Christodorus

(5th–6th cents. ad), poet from Coptus in Egypt. All that survives complete is an ekphrasis on the statues decorating the baths of Zeuxippus in Constantinople, which in diction ...

Christodorus

Christodorus   Reference library

J. H. D. Scourfield

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
158 words

... (5th–6th cents. ad ), poet from Coptus in Egypt. All that survives complete is an ekphrasis on the statues decorating the baths of Zeuxippus in Constantinople , which in diction and metrical practice shows clear traces of the influence of Nonnus , and two epigrams. He was, however, a prolific author; lost works include an epic on Anastasius I's Isaurian victory in 497 , versified histories ( patria ) of Thessalonica , Nacle, Miletus , Tralles , Aphrodisias , and Constantinople ( Suda , entry under the name), and a poem on the pupils of...

Christodorus of Coptos

Christodorus of Coptos (500)   Reference library

Anthony Kaldellis

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... statues . The collection had a prominent Trojan theme and the poem compares Anastasius to Pompey and the poet himself to Homer . Christodorus’ style was influenced by Nonnus . He should not be confused with another Christodorus from Egyptian Thebes , also mentioned in the Suda , who wrote an Ixeutica (‘fowling’) in verse and a collection of the miracles of Ss. Cosmas and Damian . Anthony Kaldellis PLRE II, Christodorus, cf. Ioannes 29. ed. in Jacoby, FGH no. 283. S. Bassett , The Urban Image of Late Antique Constantinople (2004). A. Cameron ,...

Christodorus

Christodorus  

(5th–6th cents. ad),poet from Coptus in Egypt. All that survives complete is an ekphrasis on the statues decorating the baths of Zeuxippus in Constantinople, which in diction and metrical ...
Patria

Patria  

(πάτρια), the name of a literary genre devoted to local topography, monuments, history, and legends. The term appears first in Kallinikos of Petra, who lived under Diocletian and wrote On ...
Baths of Zeuxippos

Baths of Zeuxippos  

The most famous public baths of Constantinople, the baths of Zeuxippos (Ζεύξιππος) were allegedly built by Septimius Severus and enlarged by Constantine I. Situated close to the Great Palace by ...
Poets, Wandering

Poets, Wandering  

A conventional term introduced by Cameron (infra) for the “school” of poets of the 4th and 5th C. Primarily of Egyptian origin, they came mainly from Panopolis and the neighboring ...
Demosthenes

Demosthenes  

Athenian orator; born 382 b.c, died 322.He remained “the Orator” for the Byz., who referred to him frequently and used quotations from his speeches through the 15th C. Libanios ...
Greek Anthology

Greek Anthology  

Conventional title for two collections of ancient and Byz. epigrams.1. Anthologia Palatina, the name given to a collection of about 3,700 epigrams contained in a unique MS, now divided between ...
hexameter

hexameter  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A verse of six metrical feet, which in the Greek form consists of five dactyls and a trochee or spondee; for any of the dactyls a spondee may be substituted, except in the fifth foot, where a spondee ...
Greek Anthology

Greek Anthology   Reference library

Kevin Wilkinson

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...anthology containing, in addition to Palladas, excerpts from Hellenistic and early imperial epigrammatists. Cephalas anthologized rather little from authors who were certainly active between Palladas and Agathias’ Cycle . These include occasional epigrams ascribed to Christodorus , Claudian , Cyrus of Panopolis , Damascius, Julian ( emperor ), Libanius , Marinus of Neapolis , Nilus Scholasticus, Philostorgius , Proclus , Synesius , and Theon of Alexandria . However, many anonymous epigrams in his anthology, now in Books 9 and 16, were...

Panopolis

Panopolis   Reference library

Isabella Andorlini

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...his brother, the imperial panegyrist Harpocration , in the 4th century . It also produced such literary figures as Cyrus , Nonnus , Pamprepius , and Triphiodorus , all active in the 5th century . From the surrounding territory came the writers Andronicus of Hermopolis, Christodorus of Coptos , Horapollon of Phenebith, and Olympiodorus of Thebes. Sources for Graeco-Roman Panopolis are numerous and diverse. The Panopolis papyri include the archive of Ammon scholasticus as well as documents and literature in several genres and languages....

epic, Greek

epic, Greek   Reference library

Robert Shorrock

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...flourished in its own right. An account of the sack of Thebes by Alexander the Great was the subject of a poem by Soterichus. Three fragments preserve evidence of an anonymous Blemmyomachia (P. Berol. 5003)—a Homeric-style account of a Roman campaign against the Blemmyes . Christodorus of Coptus is known to have written historical epics with the names Isaurica and Lydiaca . His hexameter description of the statues in the Baths of Zeuxippus in Constantinople (Book 2 of the Greek Anthology ) sheds light on a Late Antique interest in ecphrasis ....

Anastasius I

Anastasius I (491–518)   Reference library

Fiona Haarer and Rebecca Darley

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Anastasius exiled the unpopular Isaurians from Constantinople and sent armies against them in Isauria . By 498, the principal Isaurians had all been killed or captured. Victory was celebrated in panegyrics by Priscian and Procopius of Gaza , and in poems by Christodorus of Coptos ( AnthGraec II, 398–406 and the lost Isaurica ). After the Isaurian war, Anastasius concentrated on financial reform. Taxation , the coinage , the land and the army , bureaucratic procedures, and the judicial system were all made more efficient. Anastasius’...

anthology

anthology   Reference library

Alan Douglas Edward Cameron and P. J. Parsons

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,068 words

...To this MS and its scholia we owe almost our entire knowledge of Greek epigram from Meleager to Agathias. The epigrammatic contents of Anth. Pal. are conventionally identified as follows. 1, Christian epigrams; 2, an ekphrasis of statues in a bath in Constantinople by Christodorus ; 3, epigrams from a Cyzicene temple; 4, prefaces of Meleager, Philippus, and Agathias; 5, erotica; 6, anathematica; 7, epitaphs; 8, epitaphs by Gregory of Nazianzus ; 9, epideictica; 10, protreptica; 11, convivial and satirical epigrams; 12, paederastica; 13, poems in...

Greek Anthology

Greek Anthology   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
2,196 words

...of the Palatina . The two terms Anthologia Graeca and Anthologia Palatina are used more or less synonymously. The Anthologia Palatina 's fifteen books are organized as follows: 1. 123 Christian epigrams from the fourth through tenth centuries; 2. an ecphrastic poem by Christodorus of Coptus ( c.500 ce ) describing statues in the baths of Zeuxippus at Constantinople; 3. nineteen epigrams from the temple of Apollonis in Cyzicus; 4. the prefaces to Meleager's, Philip's, and Agathias’ anthologies; 5. 310 erotica ; 6. 358 anathematica (dedicatory...

Poetry, Greek

Poetry, Greek   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
29,051 words
Illustration(s):
4

...praise poems for cities all returned to the medium of poetry. Poetry even began to expand into the traditional domain of prose: biblical prose was transformed into Homeric hexameters, and public inscriptions appeared in hexameters and elegiac couplets. In the sixth century, Christodorus produced a hexameter description of the statues that stood in the baths of Zeuxippus in Constantinople; such ecphrastic writing had previously been the preserve of prose authors such as Flavius Philostratus and his grandson of the same name (third century ce ). The...

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