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Charlton Horn Fair

One of London's most popular fairs, until it was discontinued in 1872, famous for its obsession with horns. In its heyday in the 18th century, visitors flocked to the fair in their ...

Charlton Horn Fair

Charlton Horn Fair   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Horn Fair . One of London's most popular fairs, until it was discontinued in 1872 , famous for its obsession with horns . In its heyday in the 18th century, visitors flocked to the fair in their thousands carrying or wearing horns and every stall was decorated with them. Every sort of horn imaginable, and everything possible made of horn, was for sale, and even the gingerbread men had horns. An origin legend provides a neat reason for the horn motif. King John was out hunting on Shooter's Hill, and he stopped to rest at a miller's house. The only...

Charlton Horn Fair

Charlton Horn Fair  

Reference type:
Overview Page
One of London's most popular fairs, until it was discontinued in 1872, famous for its obsession with horns. In its heyday in the 18th century, visitors flocked to the fair in their thousands carrying ...
Ebernoe Horn Fair

Ebernoe Horn Fair  

Reference type:
Overview Page
This small Sussex village's fair on 25 July gets its name from the sheep which is roasted whole, and shared out, although the main activity of the day is a cricket match between Ebernoe and a ...
Cocidius

Cocidius  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[cf. W coch, red].A god worshipped in early Britain, especially in the north and west, whom the Romans compared with Mars. He is sometimes represented as wearing a shawl or hood while at other times, ...
horns

horns   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...to account for this explains that the knights who were away on the Crusades used the symbol of the horn as a device on their shields, and a horn therefore came to mean someone who had been away from his wife for a long time. See also Charlton Horn Fair for another alleged cuckoldry connection. A different kind of symbolism is sketched out by William Andrews ( Old Church Lore ( 1891 ), 65–79) in the form of ‘charter horns’. He identifies several existing horns which are taken as evidence of ancient land grants or charters, and links these with customs which...

Ebernoe Horn Fair

Ebernoe Horn Fair   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...its origin. A feature of the modern custom is the singing of the ‘Horn Fair’ song, which was probably not written about Ebernoe, but has now been adopted. Charlton , for example, had an infinitely more famous Horn Fair. See also HORNS . A. B. (Arthur Beckett), Sussex County Magazine 2 (1928), 331, 338; Stanley Godman , Sussex County Magazine 29 (1955), 320–3, 29 (1955), 403, 501; Hilary and Ailsa Cripps , Sussex Life (July 1968),...

Cocidius

Cocidius   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...at other times, in north Britain, he appears to have horns (cf. horned god ) and is associated with hunting. His shrine at Bewcastle, Cumberland, implies that he was a soldier's god. Cocidius may be identical with Segomo , the war-god of the Continental Celts, and he may be associated with Teutates [the ruler of the people], who was worshipped in Britain. Even more tentatively, Cocidius may be associated with Belatucadros [fair, shining one] and Mogons [the powerful one]. See D. B. Charlton and M. M. Mitcheson , ‘Yardhope, a Shrine to...

cross-dressing

cross-dressing   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...round) is a recurrent feature of traditional customs, including morris dance , mumming plays, occupational customs (especially mock weddings), Molly dance , sword dance , Castleton Garland , Abbots Bromley Horn Dance , and even the Lady Godiva procession, and is regularly mentioned as a feature of other events such as Charlton Horn Fair , and private Christmas parties. Some folklorists pronounced that cross-dressing had a ritual, fertility-enhancing function, but there is no evidence of this, and the practice has other more prosaic features which...

Instrumentation and orchestration

Instrumentation and orchestration   Reference library

Kenneth Kreitner, Mary Térey-Smith, Jack Westrup, D. Kern Holoman, G.W. Hopkins, Paul Griffiths, and Jon Alan Conrad

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
14,009 words

...‘ Zur Funktion der Hörner und Trompeten im klassischen Orchestersatz’, Helmut Osthoff zu seinem seibzigsten Geburtstag , ed. W. Stauder , U. Aarburg , and P. Cahn (Tutzing, 1969), 179–208 J.H. van der Meer : ‘Die Verwendung der Blasinstrumente im Orchester bei Haydn und seine Zeitgenossen’, Der junge Haydn: Graz 1970 , 202–20 D. Charlton : Orchestration and Orchestral Practice in Paris, 1789 to 1810 (diss., U. of Cambridge, 1974) P. Bryan : ‘The Horn in the Works of Mozart and Haydn’, Haydn Yearbook 1975 , 189–255 D. Charlton : ‘Orchestra and...

London

London   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
18,800 words
Illustration(s):
1

...not easily enter a guild and therefore had to practise their craft outside the city, although some guilds even tried to extend their power outside London. The goldsmiths’ hallmarking arrangements were applied throughout England, while the horners and embroiderers claimed rights specifically over certain country fairs, which were an important outlet for the sale of many goods. London’s significance as a centre of bookselling (both second-hand and new) rather than of book production is reflected in the rise of the stationers, or booksellers, within the...

Hornfair Park

Hornfair Park   Reference library

A Dictionary of London Place-Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...Park (in Charlton) Greenwich. Named from the notorious ‘Horn Fair’ held at Charlton (originally on the village green) from early times up to 1872 , see Cuckold's Point . It is to be noted that the old manor of Horne ( see Horn Park ) lay just to the south of Charlton; it is perhaps a possibility that the idea for the fair arose in the first place from a fanciful association of the topographical name Horne with the horns of a...

horn fair

horn fair n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
364 words

... fair n. [Horn Fair was a real occasion, held annually from the 12C until 1768 at Charlton, Kent on St Luke's day, 18 Oct; St Luke bearing the evangelistic sign of the Ox, and thus wearing horns n. ; processions of revellers, all wearing horns and sometimes masks, walked from Cuckold's Point near Deptford, to Charlton. For an extensive discussion of the actual Horn Fair see Ward , ‘A Frolic to Horn-Fair’ in Writings ( 1704 ), pp.194–222 (esp. 211–13 in which he attributes the custom to a dalliance of King John ); Grose ( 1785 , et seq.) and ...

Charlton

Charlton   Reference library

A Dictionary of London Place-Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

.... New Charlton is a mainly late-19th-century development. The somewhat notorious ‘Horn Fair’ was held at Charlton every October until closed down in 1872 , see Cuckold's Point and Hornfair Park...

Cuckold's Point

Cuckold's Point   Reference library

A Dictionary of London Place-Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

..., earlier Cuckolds haven 1588 , a promontory on the bank of the Thames, where at Cuckold's Point Stairs otherwise known as Horn Stairs a maypole surmounted with a pair of horns was apparently set up in 1562 , no doubt as a mockery or warning to cuckolded husbands. Indeed there is probably a connection with the popular ‘Horn Fair’, held at nearby Charlton until 1872 ( see Hornfair Park ), to which visitors with horns on their heads flocked, many arriving by boat (a ferry across the Thames is still shown here on the Ordnance Survey map of 1876 )....

Cuckold's Point

Cuckold's Point   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... Thames in Rotherhithe . It marks the eastern extremity of the Pool of London . It was named from the setting up here in 1562 of a pair of cuckold's horns on a maypole (a cuckold – a man whose wife had been unfaithful – was traditionally represented as having horns on his head). As well as being a generalized warning to husbands, this may have had some connection with the Horn Fair at nearby Charlton , to which ferry-borne revellers may well have come via the landing place at Cuckold's Point Stairs. Local legend says that a miller was granted an estate...

20th century

20th century: 1900 - 1999  

Reference type:
Timeline
Current Version:
2012

...Moon launches the Unification Church, a mission to unify world Christianity Moon, Sun Myung (1920–2012) Who's Who in the Twentieth Century 1 1950s Religion Christianity Asia East Asia Korea 1954 1954 Seventeen-year-old English footballer Bobby Charlton begins a 19-year career playing for Manchester United Charlton, Bobby (1937– ) Who's Who in the Twentieth Century 1 1950s Sports and games Great Britain - from 1707 United Kingdom - from 1801 British Isles Europe Society Britain 1954 1954 The country's president, Getúlio Vargas, commits suicide when the army...

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