You are looking at 1-20 of 7,535 entries  for:

  • All: Charles Young x
clear all

View:

Overview

Charles Young

(1864–1919), U.S. Army colonel, military attache. The son of slaves, Young was born in Kentucky and educated in Ohio. He became the ninth African American appointed to West ...

Young, Charles

Young, Charles (1864–1919)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

..., Charles ( 1864–1919 ), U.S. Army colonel, military attache. The son of slaves, Young was born in Kentucky and educated in Ohio. He became the ninth African American appointed to West Point, and only the third to graduate ( 1889 ). Young's military career was consistently marked by his achievement in mixing combat, command, and intelligence assignments with teaching, administrative, and diplomatic duties at home and abroad. He served for nearly three decades ( 1889–1917 ), experiencing combat in the Spanish‐American War , the Philippine War , Haiti,...

Young, Charles

Young, Charles (b. 12 March 1864)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History 1896 to the Present

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
966 words
Illustration(s):
1

..., Charles ( b. 12 March 1864 ; d. 2 January 1922 ), army officer , instructor. Charles Young was born in Mayslick, Kentucky, the only child of Gabriel and Arminta Bruen Young, both born in slavery. With Charles fourteen months old, they moved to Ripley, Ohio, where he grew up. Multitalented in music (piano, organ, guitar, composition), poetry, painting, and languages, after his early schooling Charles Young nevertheless chose, perhaps because his father had run away to join the Union forces in the Civil War, to enter officer candidate's training at the...

Young, Charles

Young, Charles (1864–1922)   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

..., Charles ( 1864–1922 ) U.S. army officer . Born to former slaves in Mayslick, Kentucky, Young became only the third African-American graduate of West Point in 1889 . Officers of his race had few opportunities for assignment, and he spent most of his service with the Ninth or Tenth Cavalry Regiments and teaching military science at Wilberforce University. He was the only black commissioned officer in the army during the Spanish-American War ( 1898 ). Though he missed action in Cuba because he was training black volunteers in Ohio, he did serve with...

Young, Charles Mayne

Young, Charles Mayne (1777–1856)   Reference library

Richard Foulkes

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

..., Charles Mayne ( 1777–1856 ), English actor , less majestical than J. P. Kemble , less passionate than Edmund Kean , who made an impressive London debut as Hamlet ( 1807 ). Equally accomplished in comedy and tragedy, he played Falstaff, Cassius, Iago, and Macbeth. Richard...

Young, Charles Mayne

Young, Charles Mayne   Reference library

Michael R. Booth

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
108 words

..., Charles Mayne ( 1777–1856 ) English actor. Young first appeared at Liverpool in 1798 , and became a leading actor there and at Edinburgh , making his debut in London at the Haymarket in 1807 as Hamlet. After that he played only leading parts at the patent theatres , acting Othello to Edmund Kean 's Iago and staying with the Shakespearian and established repertory rather than the modern drama. On stage he was graceful, dignified, stately, and solemn, somewhat lacking in passion and tenderness. He was often compared to Kemble , whom he much...

Young, Charles Mayne

Young, Charles Mayne (1777–1856)   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
200 words

..., Charles Mayne ( 1777–1856 ), English actor, who in 1798 made his début in Liverpool as Mr Green. From there he went to Manchester and Edinburgh, where he became an intimate friend of Sir Walter Scott . He was also friendly with the elder Charles Mathews , and with his help appeared at the Haymarket Theatre in London in 1807 as Hamlet, Mathews playing Polonius. As one of the finest disciples of the Kemble school of acting, Young proved himself a tower of strength in support of such players as John Philip Kemble , Mrs Siddons , Macready , and ...

Charles Young

Charles Young  

(1864–1919), U.S. Army colonel, military attache.The son of slaves, Young was born in Kentucky and educated in Ohio. He became the ninth African American appointed to West Point, and ...
Charles Mayne Young

Charles Mayne Young  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1777–1856)English actor. Young first appeared at Liverpool in 1798, and became a leading actor there and at Edinburgh, making his debut in London at the Haymarket in 1807 as ...
Sonnets

Sonnets   Reference library

Michael Dobson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,480 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...for the Fair Youth, the Dark Lady, and Mr W.H. rather than to explicate the poetry per se . The first attempt to make unambiguous confessional sense of Shakespeare’s sequence by putting the poems into a different order was made by Charles Knight in 1841 , and many more followed. Nineteenth-century discussions of the young man sequence extend from Coleridge ’s attempt to excuse the Sonnets’ apparent homoeroticism to Oscar Wilde ’s celebration of it (in his story ‘The Portrait of Mr W.H’. and at his notorious trial in 1895 , an event which effectively...

15 Children’s Books

15 Children’s Books   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
4,997 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and *Rousseau argued that education should transform society by effecting radical change in the attitudes and behaviour of young people. Early childhood was increasingly viewed as the critical stage of life for shaping the future adult, so that ensuring the quality of elementary instruction took on a new urgency. Yet Isaac Watts is a rare example of an important early 18 th -century author who condescended to write for young people and to put his name on the title-pages of his books: most preferred *anonymity , regarding themselves as philanthropists...

As You Like It

As You Like It   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,253 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to his rank, and on Oliver’s arrival Orlando confronts him to demand his patrimony. Dismissing him, Oliver summons Charles the wrestler, and after Charles has recounted the (stale) news that the Duke has been driven into exile in the forest of Ardenne (spelt ‘Arden’ in the Folio text) by his younger brother Frederick, who retains the Duke’s daughter Rosalind at court to keep his own daughter company, Oliver maligns Orlando, instructing Charles to be sure to kill him in the following day’s wrestling tournament. Alone, Oliver reflects briefly on his rancorous...

The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,171 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...Jew of Venice in 1701 . It was only in 1741 that the original play returned to the stage, with Charles Macklin as a fierce, methodically prepared Shylock (a role he retained to his retirement in 1789 ). Macklin’s most notable successors included J. P. Kemble (with Sarah Siddons as Portia), Edmund Kean , who played Shylock wholly sympathetically in 1814 (replacing his traditional red beard with a small black one), William Charles Macready , Charles Kean , and, most famously, Henry Irving , whose aristocratic, proud Shylock, first seen at the ...

Novels

Novels   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,137 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...history for the novel was structured in critical works such as Dunlop's, but facilitated by the popularity of collections of novels—among the most important John Cooke 's ( 1731–1810 ) series in the 1790s, Anna Laetitia *Barbauld 's The British Novelists ( 1810 ), and Charles Whittingham 's ( 1795–1876 ) Pocket Novelists in the 1820s. These collections took advantage of the ending of perpetual *copyright in 1774 , and they both indicated and consolidated readerly interest in the novel as a distinct literary form. The novels in such series gained...

Music

Music   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,344 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the famous Linley family. We do not know exactly what was played, but Bath society generally preferred novelty in music, as in all things, except for a few familiar oratorio excerpts, soprano arias, and Corelli 's Christmas Concerto . In more sober mood it began to endorse Charles *Burney 's ‘revolution in taste’, from ancient to modern, and by the 1780s there was some move towards stability in serious areas of modern repertoire: keyboard works by Clementi , much Haydn, and a little Mozart. Significantly, perhaps uniquely, Bath for a time provided a...

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of signals and meanings and so metaphorically rather than directly (see Charles Phythian‐Adams , ‘Ritual Constructions of Society’, in Rosemary Horrox and W. Mark Ormrod (eds), A Social History of England, 1200–1500 (2006) ). Since such clusters could be rearranged as need arose, moreover, ritual was flexible enough to evolve both its content and its meanings over time, not least when traditional rural practices had to be adapted to unprecedented urban conditions (see Charles Phythian‐Adams , ‘Milk and Soot: The Changing Vocabulary of a Popular Ritual...

Design

Design   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,178 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...architects, Sir William *Chambers and Robert Adam. Other London-based manufacturers catering for the luxury market used artists who were familiar with the new style. Benjamin Vulliamy ( 1780–1854 ), one of London's leading clock-and watchmakers, employed the young sculptors John Deare , Charles Peart , and John Rossi , as well as Bacon, to model figures for his clocks of neoclassical design, which were then produced in biscuit by William Duesbury 's ( 1725–86 ) Derby porcelain works. The royal gold-smiths Rundell and Bridge (Rundell, Bridge, and...

Henry VI Part 1

Henry VI Part 1   Reference library

Randall Martin and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,505 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...between Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, and Henry Beaufort, Bishop of Winchester. 1.2 The French are beaten back after trying to disperse the English siege of Orléans. Joan la Pucelle presents herself as a holy peasant maid divinely destined to liberate France; she recognizes Charles the Dauphin without ever having seen him, and defeats him in a test of combat. 1.3 A violent brawl between Gloucester, Winchester, and their men is dispersed by the Mayor of London. 1.4 The Master Gunner of Orléans fires upon a tower from where Talbot and the English have...

King John

King John   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,371 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... All Is True ( Henry VIII ) , in favour of the two tetralogies. Commentators have usually found the play a mass of contradictions, whether between the defiant, potentially sympathetic King John of the early acts and the wavering would-be murderer of Arthur of the later (as did Charles Knight ) , or between the psychological naturalism of some scenes (notably that of Constance’s grief, 3.4) and the conventionality of others (as did Barrett Wendell ). It is only since the advent of Bertolt Brecht and his view that historical dramas may exploit deliberate...

The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Two Gentlemen of Verona   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,682 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...figure of perfect chivalry in the only well-known painting derived from this play, the Pre-Raphaelite Holman Hunt ’s Valentine Rescuing Silvia from Proteus (later renamed The Two Gentlemen of Verona ), 1851 . The play was a failure successively for William Charles Macready ( 1841 ), Charles Kean ( 1846 in New York, 1848 in London), Samuel Phelps ( 1857 ), Osmond Tearle (Stratford, 1890 ), Augustin Daly ( 1895 , with Ada Rehan as Julia), and Harley Granville-Barker ( 1904 ), and while William Poel ’s ‘Elizabethan’ production at His...

The Merry Wives of Windsor

The Merry Wives of Windsor   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,720 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...play has remained popular ever since, often starring actors already established as Sir John in Henry IV (from Betterton through Quin to Beerbohm Tree and beyond), though many important performers have also been attracted to the role of Ford (including Kemble and Charles Kean ) , and to those of the wives themselves (including Anne Bracegirdle and Elizabeth Barry , Madge Kendal and Ellen Terry , the Vanbrugh sisters, Peggy Ashcroft and Edith Evans ) . Modern directors have found possibilities in the play too: Komisarjevsky gave it a...

View: