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Cesair 1,

Subject: Religion

1 Cessair, Ceasair, Cesara, Kesair. Leader or queen of the first invasion of Ireland in the Mythological Cycle. According to the curious reckoning of the Lebor Gabála [Book of ...

Cesair 1,

Cesair 1,   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Current Version:
2004

... 1, 1 Cessair , Ceasair , Cesara , Kesair . Leader or queen of the first invasion of Ireland in the Mythological Cycle . According to the curious reckoning of the Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions], an attempt to mix Irish memory with biblical history, Cesair is a daughter of Bith, a son of Noah, and Birren who escapes to Inis Fáil (Ireland) just before the Flood; she has left her homeland in disgrace because she was denied admission to the Ark. An alternate version has her as the daughter of Banba , one of the eponymous goddesses of Ireland . She...

Cesair 1,

Cesair 1,  

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Overview Page
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Religion
1 Cessair, Ceasair, Cesara, Kesair. Leader or queen of the first invasion of Ireland in the Mythological Cycle. According to the curious reckoning of the Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions], an attempt ...
Cesair

Cesair  

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Religion
According to the Book of Invasions, Cesair (Cessair) was the granddaughter of Noah and the daughter of Bith. It was said that when her father was denied a place in ...
Bith

Bith  

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Religion
[Ir., world (?)].In the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions], an apocryphal son of Noah who was denied entry to the Ark. With the counsel of his daughter, Cesair, he built an idol who ...
Adná

Adná  

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[cf. Ir. adnál, very shameful, modest].A legendary early explorer of Ireland, the son of Bith, brother of Cesair. He was sent on his mission by the pseudo-historical King Ninus of Syria.
Ladra

Ladra  

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Religion
Cesair's pilot or helmsman in the first invasion of Ireland, and first man to die there; with sixteen wives, he suffered from an excess of women.
Úgaine Mór

Úgaine Mór  

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Possibly a historical early Irish chieftain, frequently cited as the ultimate ancestor in medieval genealogies. Both Labraid Loingsech of Leinster and Conn Cétchathach [of the Hundred Battles] ...
Dún na mBarc

Dún na mBarc  

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[Ir., Fort of the Ships].Point of landing on Bantry Bay, Co. Cork, for the first invasion of Ireland, led by Cesair, according to the Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions]. Identified today with Dunnamark ...
Nemedians

Nemedians  

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Religion
Mythical early invaders of Ireland according to the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions], named for the eponymous founder Nemed. They came third in succession after (1) Cesair and (2) the ...
Fintan mac Bóchra

Fintan mac Bóchra  

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Religion
The only Irishman to survive the biblical Flood, Fintan was a mythical seer whose name is cited in many texts. The Bóchra/Bóchna of his patronymic is never identified; it may refer to his mother or ...
Partholonians

Partholonians  

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Religion
Mythical early invaders of Ireland, according to the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions]; they are named for their leader, Partholón [L Bartholomaeus]. Arriving from the eastern ...
Nemedians

Nemedians   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

.... Mythical early invaders of Ireland according to the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions], named for the eponymous founder Nemed . They came third in succession after (1) Cesair and (2) the Partholonians , who preceded them by thirty years. Contemporary with the predatory Fomorians , arbitrarily cited here as the fourth invaders, the Nemedians preceded the Fir Bolg by eleven generations. Departing from Scythia in thirty-four ships, all but one lost when the party greedily pursued a tower of gold seen on the sea, the Nemedians...

Mythological Cycle

Mythological Cycle   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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.... Personages most often cited in the Mythological Cycle are firstly Lug Lámfhota, the Dagda, Nuadu Airgetlám, and Míl Espáine, but also: Áine (1) , Ana , Angus Óg , Balor , Boand , Bres , Bran mac Febail , Brian (1) , Brigit , the Cailleach Bhéirre , Cairbre mac Ethne , Cesair , Clídna , Cridenbél , Dian Cécht , Donn (1) , Donn mac Míled , Eochaid Airem , Eochaid mac Eirc , Étaín (1) , Étaín Óg , Fintan mac Bóchra , Goibniu , Iuchair , Iucharba , Lir , Macha , Manannán mac Lir , Midir , the Mórrígan , Nemed , Ogma ,...

Fintan mac Bóchra

Fintan mac Bóchra   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...it may refer to his mother or may imply the sea. He may be yet another figure derived from the shadowy Find implied in Ptolemy (2nd cent. ad ). According to the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions], Fintan was one of three men who accompanied the lady Cesair , whom he took as a wife, and her fifty women, forty days before the Flood. When the other two men died, all the women approached Fintan, who fled from them. A poem later ascribed to Fintan explains how he survived the Flood when all others perished by hiding in the hill of...

Lebor Gabála Érenn

Lebor Gabála Érenn   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...Gaels. Although his name means ‘soldier of Spain’, Míl is a Scythian who marries Scota [L, Irishwoman] (1). His descendants leave Spain for Kerry 297 years after the arrival of the Tuatha Dé Danann, defeat their predecessors, and push on to found Tara . The Milesians still reign when the time-frame of Irish heroic literature ceases. The first two invasions are the least grounded and most contrived of the seven. Many of the names in Cesair's retinue appear to have been invented to provide a gloss for place-names. Elements in her invasion are both...

Cath Maige Tuired

Cath Maige Tuired   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...Co. Sligo. The lengthy narrative preceding the action of the two battles of Mag Tuired is given in the pseudo-history or fictionalized history of the Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions]. That document details the successive invasions of Ireland by five groups: (1) under Cesair , a granddaughter of the biblical Noah; (2) the Partholonians , who perished in a plague; (3) the Nemedians ; (4) the Fomorians , not a separate invasion but euhemerized deities characterized as demonic pirates who constantly prey upon settlers and appear in...

Ireland

Ireland   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...[land of Ana], in the 10th-century Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary], alluding to Ana , the pre-Christian earth-goddess. Perhaps as old are the three beautiful divinities of the Lebor Gabála , Ériu , Banba , and Fódla . Also from the Lebor Gabála is the first invader, Cesair , a woman whose name can be a poetic synonym for Ireland. Two early modern personae, Cáit Ní Dhuibhir and Róisín Dubh [Dark Rosaleen], depict a lovely maiden in distress. Not all personifications have radiated sexual allure, however. The loathsome Cailleach Bhéirre [hag of...

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