You are looking at 1-20 of 31 entries  for:

  • All: Cathari x
clear all

View:

Overview

Cathari

Subject: Religion

(Gk. καθαρός, ‘pure’). The name has been applied to several sects, e.g. to the Novatianists by St Epiphanius and other Greek Fathers, and, acc. to St Augustine, in the form ... ...

Cathari

Cathari   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,007 words

... There is much primary material in the records of the Inquisition, and some valuable treatises on Catharism written by both supporters and critics. These include the Summa de Catharis of Rainer Sacconi, OP, and the Liber de Duobus Principiis , prob. by John de Lugio , both ed., with a frag. of a Catharist Ritual, by A. Dondaine , OP (Rome, 1939; the Summa de Catharis is also ed. by F. Šanjek , OP, in Archivum Fratrum Praedicatorum , 44 (1974), 31–60; and the Liber de Duobus Principiis and the frag. of the Ritual are also ed., with Fr. tr. and...

Cathari

Cathari  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Gk. καθαρός, ‘pure’).The name has been applied to several sects, e.g. to the Novatianists by St Epiphanius and other Greek Fathers, and, acc. to St Augustine, in the form ...
Rainerio Sacchoni

Rainerio Sacchoni  

(d. c.1263) Dominican inquisitor and author of Summa de Catharis et Pauperibus de Lugduno (1250).Rainerio was a Cathar ‘perfect one’ before accepting Catholicism in 1245. His treatise describes ...
St Peter Martyr

St Peter Martyr  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(c.1200–52), Inquisitor. Born at Verona (hence known also as Veronensis), of a predominantly Catharist family, he was nevertheless brought up as a Catholic. He entered the Dominican Order, probably ...
Cathars

Cathars  

A member of a heretical medieval Christian sect which professed a form of Manichaean dualism and sought to achieve great spiritual purity. The name is recorded in English from the mid 17th century, ...
Sacchoni, Rainerio

Sacchoni, Rainerio (c.1263)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
72 words

...Rainerio (d. c .1263 ) *Dominican inquisitor and author of Summa de Catharis et Pauperibus de Lugduno ( 1250 ). Rainerio was a *Cathar ‘perfect one’ before accepting Catholicism in 1245 . His treatise describes Cathar and *Waldensian beliefs and the organization of Cathar churches. See also inquisition ; poor men of lyons . Michael Frassetto W. Wakefield and A. Evans, trs , ‘The Summa of Rainerius Sacconi’, Heresies in the High Middle Ages (1991),...

Cathars

Cathars   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
127 words

...(Lat., Cathari, from Gk., katharoi, ‘pure ones’). Christian dualist heresy in W. Europe , which, in the 13th–14th cents., was a serious threat to the Catholic Church especially in S. France ( see ALBIGENSES ) and N. Italy. The origins of the movement are obscure, and although its doctrines were influenced by the Bogomils of Bulgaria, it remains a possibility that its dualism was an independent development or inheritance. The inner circle of the Cathars were the ‘perfects’, who followed a life of rigorous asceticism and praying the Lord's Prayer . ...

Cathars

Cathars   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...(from Medieval Latin Cathari , ultimately from Greek katharoi , ‘pure’) Members of an ascetic heretical Christian sect, which flourished in parts of western Europe, especially in Languedoc, during the Middle Ages. They believed that the material world is evil, but that the human soul is good and can enable people to be reunited with God ( see also manicheans ). They held that Christ was an angel, who did not really undergo human birth or death. There were two ranks among the Cathars: the perfect (leaders) and believers (followers). Cathars are also...

Albigenses

Albigenses   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
484 words

...Albigenses . A medieval term for the inhabitants of parts of S. France, and hence applied to the heretics who were strong there in the late 12th and early 13th cents. These were a branch of the Cathari (q.v.). The Albigenses were condemned by successive Councils, at Lombers in 1165 and at Verona in 1184 . Innocent III promoted a series of preaching missions, but after the assassination of the Papal legate Peter of Castelnau in 1208 , he authorized a Crusade against them. The expedition led to a long period of warfare in S. France, in which the N....

Bogomils

Bogomils   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
180 words

...human body, but only the appearance of one. They rejected the sacraments, churches, and relics, but retained a hierarchy of their own. In the 11th cent. Bogomilism spread rapidly in the Balkans and Asia Minor, and from the mid-12th cent. it exerted a formative influence on the Cathari in France and Italy. In the 13th cent. its adherents secured a notable success in Dalmatia and especially in Bosnia, where under the name of Patarines they later became the dominant religious group. After the Turkish conquests, many people adopted Islam ; practically no trace...

Conrad of Marburg

Conrad of Marburg (1180–1233)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
338 words

... St Elizabeth (q.v.), Ludwig's wife, whom he treated, esp. in her later years, with excessive severity; and after her death ( 19 Nov. 1231 ) he was appointed as one of the witnesses in the cause of her canonization. Meanwhile he proved himself a zealous opponent of heresies ( Cathari , Waldenses ) and on 11 Oct. 1231 Gregory IX ( 1227–41 ) nominated him the first Papal Inquisitor in Germany, with absolute authority over heretics. He exercised his authority ruthlessly, often condemning persons on insufficient evidence and handing them over for punishment...

Patarenes

Patarenes   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
387 words

...and became Pope Gregory VII 's allies against Henry . With Erlembald's death in 1075 they suffered a crippling blow, but the movement persisted at Milan into the early 12th cent. In the 1170s the name Patareni reappeared as a general label for heretics, especially the Cathari in Italy, e.g. in can. 27 of the Third Lateran Council ( 1179 ). It long remained current, with many variations of spelling, to describe both W. heretics and the Bogomils of Bosnia and Dalmatia. C. Violante , La Pataria milanese e la riforma ecclesiastica , 1 (Istituto storico...

Peter Martyr, St

Peter Martyr, St (1200–52)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
300 words

...into a predominantly Catharist family, he nevertheless grew up as a Catholic. He was sent to study in Bologna , where he entered the Dominican Order, prob. c. 1220–1 . He was renowned as an eloquent and dedicated preacher and a successful controversialist against the Cathari. In Sept. 1251 he was appointed Inquisitor in Milan and Como by Pope Innocent IV . He and his companion were assassinated on 6 Apr. 1252 between Como and Milan. As he died he prayed for his murderer, commended himself to God and began to recite the Creed. A late tradition...

Humiliati

Humiliati   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
315 words

...and apostolic movement, which later developed into a recognized institution in the Church. Its origins are obscure. Its adherents adopted a simple lifestyle, refused to take oaths , and insisted on preaching without authorization. In 1184 , along with the Waldenses and Cathari , they were condemned for their disobedience to the hierarchy. Most of them, however, were reconciled to the Church and reorganized by Innocent III in 1201 in the form of three orders, governed by a common general chapter: the first order consisted of double monasteries of...

heresy

heresy   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
883 words

...of the apostolic Church. They thus had much in common with the orthodox reform movements, such as the mendicant orders, some of whose members (esp. among the Franciscans ) were charged with heresy. Many of the heretical bodies in the Middle Ages (e.g. the Bogomils , Cathari , Waldensians , the followers of Henry of Lausanne and Peter de Bruys ) came to reject the sacraments as well as other institutions of the Church. The Inquisition was established to secure the conversion of heretics, and punished the obdurate. With the Reformation, the...

burning

burning   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
626 words

...The burning of convicted heretics was a medieval development. Although the Emp. Diocletian had enacted in 287 that Manichaean leaders should be burned, this law was rescinded by his Christian successors and seems to have had no influence on later practice, even though the Cathari were known as Manichees in the Middle Ages. In 1022 Robert II of France burned some ten convicted heretics at Orléans, and burning subsequently became the normal penalty for heresy throughout the W. Initially such executions were carried out against the wishes of the Church...

Bogomils

Bogomils   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
552 words

...only the appearance of one. They rejected the Sacraments, churches, and relics, but retained a hierarchy of their own. Bogomilism spread rapidly in the Balkans and Asia Minor in the 11th cent., and from the mid-12th cent. onwards exerted a formative influence on the sect of the Cathari in France and Italy. The leader of a Bogomil organization in Constantinople was burnt at the stake c. 1110 , and strong measures were taken against the Bogomils in Serbia c. 1180 and in Bulgaria in 1211 . In the 13th cent. its votaries secured a notable success in Dalmatia,...

Gnosticism

Gnosticism   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,013 words

...it brought a release and joy and hope, as if awakening from a nightmare. One later offshoot, Manicheism, became for a time a world religion, reaching as far as China, and there are at least elements of gnosticism in such medieval movements as those of the Bogomiles and the Cathari. Gnostic influence has been seen in various works of modern literature, such as those of William Blake and W. B. Yeats , and is also to be found in the Theosophy of Madame Blavatsky and the Anthroposophy of Rudolph Steiner . Gnosticism was of lifelong interest to the...

Steiner, Rudolf

Steiner, Rudolf (1861–1925)   Reference library

The Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences
Length:
774 words

...Rudolf ( 1861–1925 ) – and Anthroposophy The relationship between nature and the spiritual side of humanity occurs increasingly within an arena dominated by a rationalistic objectivity based on sense perceptions and critical thinking. The religious dimension can vary from the Cathari view that nature is evil to that of animism, which sees spirit in all aspects of nature. Rudolf Steiner argued for a distinction between religion resting on dogma or belief and spirituality founded on a complementary perception that augments the physical senses. Steiner claimed...

Confirmation

Confirmation   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
1,254 words

...of Pentecost, so that the Christian might courageously confess the name of Christ. (Denzinger-Schönmetzer, Enchiridion Symbolorum Definitionem et Declarationem De Rebus Fidei et Morum Rome, 1976; nos. 1317–1319). Dissenting voices from the past, such as the Waldensians, the Cathari, Wycliffe, and Hus, were thus relegated to the periphery. Within the mainstream the only matters still in dispute were whether the sacrament was absolutely necessary for salvation and whether it was instituted by Christ or the apostles. Luther inherited this late medieval...

View: