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Captivity Narrative

Subject: Literature

Account of kidnapping by Indians of white persons, usually women, taken by long journeys into the wilderness. The tale of Mary Rowlandson (1682), the earliest example, is representative of ...

Captivity Narrative

Captivity Narrative   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
158 words

... Narrative , account of kidnapping by Indians of white persons, usually women, taken by long journeys into the wilderness. The tale of Mary Rowlandson ( 1682 ), the earliest example, is representative of New England colonial texts concentrating on the Indians as sons of the Devil removing a daughter of Zion into Satan's lands, often considering it a judgment or test of the Lord. Later accounts, like that of John Williams ( 1707 ), telling of the seizure of a man, represent an 18th-century shift to a political point of view in presenting the French...

Captivity Narrative

Captivity Narrative   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Literature
Length:
170 words

...Captivity Narrative , account of kidnapping by Indians of white persons, usually women, taken by long journeys into the wilderness. The tale of Mary Rowlandson ( 1682 ), the earliest example, is representative of New England colonial texts concentrating on the Indians as sons of the Devil removing a daughter of Zion into Satan’s lands, often considering it a judgment or test of the Lord. Later accounts, like that of John Williams ( 1707 ), telling of the seizure of a man, represent an 18th-century shift to a political point of view in presenting the French...

Captivity Narrative

Captivity Narrative  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Account of kidnapping by Indians of white persons, usually women, taken by long journeys into the wilderness. The tale of Mary Rowlandson (1682), the earliest example, is representative of New ...
Captivity Narratives

Captivity Narratives   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
1,201 words

...recorded it. In his version, during her captivity she consistently held the view that “God will avenge the weak and powerless.” After six months in captivity, her prayers were answered when her husband John found and rescued her. Women's captivity narratives changed with the eighteenth-century movement west. The narratives shift to a more biographical format, which also emphasizes the pioneer spirit. The unattributed introduction to The Thrilling Narrative of the Sufferings of Mrs. Jane Adeline Wilson during Her Captivity Among the Comanche Indians ( 1853 )...

Captivity narratives

Captivity narratives   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
810 words

...Blackfellows (1948) strung together a series of captivity and castaway incidents. Fictional treatments of ‘captivity’ episodes include Patrick White's A Fringe of Leaves (1976) and David Malouf's Remembering Babylon (1993) . More recently, captivity narratives have attracted a renewed attention from historians drawing upon post-colonial perspectives. The Australian prisoner-of-war experience of World War I, and in particular World War II , generated a related strand of writing on captivity and survival. Like the traditional frontier tales,...

Indian Captivity Narratives

Indian Captivity Narratives   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
554 words

...Captivity Narratives . Indian captivity narratives date back to the colonial period, most famously to Mary Rowlandson's A Narrative of the Captivity and Restauration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson ( 1682 ). The genre was explored by many other early writers, including John Gyles and Elizabeth Meader Hanson . Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie and James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans contributed to expand the genre, presenting fictionalized versions of captivity narratives. The pattern of a captivity narrative usually involves a...

Captivity Narratives, Indian.

Captivity Narratives, Indian.   Reference library

Charles L. Cohen

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
578 words

...in captivity in 1676 , during King Philip's War .) During the next two centuries, Indian captivity narratives gained such popularity that many editions have disappeared because they were literally read to pieces. Captivity narratives ran the gamut from fact to fiction, but the plot remained consistent: the protagonist is ripped from family and friends, initiated into native society, and comes home ineffably changed. Most willingly returned when they could, but a few preferred to stay, becoming (as did Mary Jemison in James Seaver's prototypical narrative of...

Captivity Narratives, Native American

Captivity Narratives, Native American   Reference library

Daniel Hutchins

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Puritan North American captivity narratives is Mary Rowlandson's The True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson , first published in London in 1682 . The captivity in this first wave of Puritan narratives generally takes on a symbolic and typological value, reinforced by frequent scriptural citations and allusions. The religious expressions deriving from the captivity experience tend to treat the beneficial aspects of that captivity, especially in the context of redemptive suffering and the captivity as evidence of Divine...

Captivity Narratives, Native American

Captivity Narratives, Native American   Reference library

Charles L. Cohen

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Narratives, Native American An archetypal genre recounting an innocent’s descent into, and redemption from, an alien world, Native American captivity narratives were uniquely both a product and a representation of the American historical experience. Emerging from real conflicts between indigenous peoples and encroaching Euro-Americans, these narratives also served ideological and political needs. Tropes of captivity already figure in some sixteenth- and seventeenth-century European reports of exploration and discovery, John Smith’s recollection of his...

Indian Captivity Narratives

Indian Captivity Narratives  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Indian captivity narratives date back to the colonial period, most famously to Mary Rowlandson's A Narrative of the Captivity and Restauration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682). The genre was explored ...
Susannah Willard Johnson

Susannah Willard Johnson  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1729–1810), captivity narrative author.Johnson's A Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Johnson (1796) went through ten editions in the fifty years following its initial publication. A poignant tale ...
Exploration Narratives

Exploration Narratives  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In the history of American literary criticism, exploration narratives traditionally referred to writings by men of European descent who explored the New World frontier from its earliest existence in ...
Mary Rowlandson

Mary Rowlandson  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(c.1635–c.1678),daughter of John White, an early settler and wealthy proprietor of Lancaster, Mass., in 1656 married Joseph Rowlandson, a Congregational minister. During King Philip's War, when the ...
Elizabeth Meader Hanson

Elizabeth Meader Hanson  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1684–1737), author of a Quaker captivity narrative.On 27 August 1724, a party of French and Indian allies attacked the Hansons' isolated farmhouse at Cocheco in Dover Township, New Hampshire ...
Daughters

Daughters  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In a creole culture, where marriage outside a group invariably threatens that group's ties to the country of origin, daughters are especially problematic. To maintain an English identity in North ...
Eliza Fraser

Eliza Fraser  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(?1798–1858)was the wife of James Fraser, captain of the Stirling Castle, a ship that was wrecked on Swain Reef near Rockhampton, Queensland, in May 1836. The survivors of the ...
Mary Jemison

Mary Jemison  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1743–1833),“the White Woman of the Genesee,” was captured by Indians from her western Pennsylvania home at the age of 15, and, developing a deep affection for them, married into the Delaware tribe ...
Wild white man

Wild white man  

Was a nineteenth-century term used to describe white men who lived in the bush, usually with some degree of contact with Aborigines. The first ‘wild white man’ is believed to ...
Literature, Popular.

Literature, Popular.  

Although Native American and African-American cultures of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries had rich and varied traditions of oral narrative, the first popular printed literature in what is ...
slave Narratives

slave Narratives  

A written account by an escaped or freed slave of his or her experiences of slavery. A special American form of autobiography, the slave narrative appeared as an important kind of abolitionist ...

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