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canon

Subject: Religion

Originally (in the Roman Catholic Church), a member of certain orders of clergy that live communally according to an ecclesiastical rule in the same way as monks (also as canon regular or ...

Canon

Canon   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
13 words

... . For legal term, see Canon Law ; Canons . For hymnographic term, see Kanon...

canon

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The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music
Length:
453 words

... 2 in 1 (and similarly with canon 3 in 1 , etc.). A canon 4 in 2 is a double canon, i.e. one in which 2 vv. are carrying on one canon whilst 2 others are engaged on another. Canon by augmentation has the imitating vv. in longer notes than the one that they are imitating. Canon by diminution is the reverse. Canon cancrizans is a type in which the imitating v. gives out the melody backwards (‘cancrizans’ from Lat. cancer = crab; but crabs move sideways). Other names for it are canon per recte et retro (or rectus et inversus ) and retrograde ...

canon

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
103 words

... Term used in Christian religion with several meanings. The basic meaning is a rule or standard. In this sense, a canon is something accepted or decreed as a rule or regulation, such as the official list of saints or the list of books accepted as genuine parts of the Bible . This is the meaning embraced by the term canon law. Initially a canon was also a priest in a cathedral or collegiate church, whose life was regulated by the precepts of canon law . They were distinct from secular canons, who lived outside the cathedral and, although ordained, played a...

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
110 words

... ( ecclesiastical title ) . Though first applied to all clergy on the official staff of a diocese, the word came to be limited to those secular clergy belonging to a cathedral or collegiate church. ‘Residentiary canons’ form the permanent salaried staff of a cathedral and are primarily responsible for the maintenance of its services, fabric, etc. In the C of E a ‘non-residentiary canon’ is one who holds an unsalaried post, which entails certain privileges and responsibilities. ‘Lay canons’ are lay people who, under the Cathedrals Measure 1999 , form a...

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
80 words

... . The Greek word originally meant a rod or bar; it came to be used of the rules of an art or trade or to signify a list or catalogue. In Christian language it denotes the list of Books regarded by the Church as Scripture ( canon of Scripture ); the central part of the Mass ( Canon of the Mass ); and the rules concerning the life and discipline of the Church ( canon law...

Canon

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The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... ( Canoun ), rule (L., from Greek kanon ). A common name ( sing. or pl. ) for a scientific text embodying a series of procedural rules. The Pardoner 's remark that ‘ Avycen wrote never in no canon more wondrous symptoms of poisoning’ refers to Avicenna's widely circulated Canon Medicinœ . In the prologue to A Treatise of the Astrolabe Chaucer promises to include in Part IV a lunar table with a canon to explain its use. In Part II he writes as though Lewis (Lewis Chaucer ) already possessed a calendar with a table of conjunctions and...

canon

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The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art and Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
134 words

... is an ecclesiastical title which was once universal for all diocesan clergy, but is now limited to those attached to a cathedral or collegiate church. Originally, canons were expected to live a communal life, but in the Middle Ages this was very liberally interpreted, and cathedral clergy often possessed and lived in private property, as well as sharing in the revenues of the cathedral. They were known as ‘secular’ canons, to distinguish them from ‘regular’ canons who, as a result of the 11th-century reforms of Pope S. Gregory VII, lived as a community...

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A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
229 words

... (Gk., kanon, rule). Texts or books that have special authority in a religious tradition. The concept of canonicity derives mainly from Christianity, and in Buddhism identifies not divinely inspired literature but those writings that are thought to be ‘the word of the Buddha ’. This requirement is understood by the Theravāda school as meaning words actually spoken by the historical Buddha. The canon of this school, known as the Pāli Canon , was closed according to tradition at the first council ( see Council of Rājagṛha ). It is acknowledged,...

canon

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
220 words

...canon . The Greek word κανών ‎ meant a straight rod or bar. Metaphorically the term came to be used of the rules of an art or a trade or to signify a list or catalogue. In Christian language it was adopted to denote the list of inspired books which the Church regarded as composing Holy Scripture ( see canon of Scripture ), liturgical rules, esp. that part of the Mass which includes the consecration ( see Canon of the Mass ), and rules concerning the life and discipline of the Church. In law, the word ‘canon’ was gradually used exclusively of...

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
62 words

... ( hymnological ) . In the E. Church stanzas of poetry began in the 7th cent. to be inserted between the verses of the biblical canticles sung during the second part of Orthros . In most places the text of the canticles (except the Magnificat ) then disappeared, leaving only the sets of odes which are known as the canon...

canon

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Percy Scholes, Judith Nagley, and Arnold Whittall

The Oxford Companion to Music

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
1,202 words
Illustration(s):
1

...with one melody a canon three in one, and so on. Sometimes two canons are carried on simultaneously (e.g. first and third voice in canon with one melody, second and fourth in canon with another): such group canons are defined as canon four in two, as appropriate to the number of voices and melodies involved. A canon in which the imitating voice or voices gives out the melody in notes of longer rhythmic value than the original is called a canon by augmentation; one in which it imitates in shorter note-values is a canon by diminution. A canon in which the...

CANON

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
32 words

... (from Gr. kanōn [measuring rod, standard]), term that originally designated standards of excellence; it eventually came to refer to the authoritative body of Holy Scriptures. See also Bible .–BARUCH J....

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The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... A body of writings recognized by authority. Those books of holy scripture which religious leaders accept as genuine are canonical , as are those works of a literary author which scholars regard as authentic. The canon of a national literature is a body of writings especially approved by critics or anthologists and deemed suitable for academic study. Canonicity is the quality of being canonical. Verb : canonize . See also corpus , oeuvre . Further reading: Christopher Kuipers , The Canon ...

Canon

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Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...as a saint and is put upon the Canon or Catalogue of Saints of the Church. Canon law A collection of ecclesiastical laws that serve as the rule of church government. Specialists in canon law are called canonists. Canons of the Mass The fixed form of consecratory prayer used in the greek church and roman catholic church , from the Sanctus to the paternoster . Augustine canons See under augustine . Black Canons See under black . Book of Canons, The See under book . Crab canon See under crab . White Canons See premonstratensian...

canon

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
426 words

...to maintain this mode of life came to be known as ‘secular canons’ to distinguish them from the Augustinian or ‘regular’ canons (q.v.) who lived under a semi-monastic rule. ‘Residentiary canons’ form the permanent salaried staff of a cathedral and are mainly responsible for the maintenance of its services, fabric, etc. In the C of E a ‘non-residentiary canon’ (often ‘honorary canon’) is one who holds an unsalaried post, which may entail certain privileges and responsibilities. ‘ Minor canons ’ are clerics usually chosen for their ability to sing the...

Canon

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
305 words

...witness to the present canon of the New Testament is the Festal Letter of Athanasius for 367 ce ; and the canon of both Testaments was probably finally fixed in Rome in 382 . The term ‘canon’ is then frequently applied to collections of sacred or holy texts in other religions. For Hinduism, see ŚRUTI ; SMṚTI ; VEDA ; VEDĀNTA ; and further refs. ad loc . For Buddhism (Pāli canon, etc.), see BUDDHIST SCRIPTURES ; TRIPIṬAKA . The term ‘canon’ has been applied to revered and authoritative Jain texts (e.g. ‘the 45 text canon’), but the term is...

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
33 words

... In music, form of counterpoint using strict imitation. All the voices or parts have the same melody, but each voice starts at a different time, at the same or a different...

canon

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The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
33 words

... A body of approved works, comprising either (i) writings genuinely considered to be those of a given author; or (ii) writings considered to represent the best standards of a given literary tradition....

canon

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
33 words

... A body of approved works, comprising either (i) writings genuinely considered to be those of a given author; or (ii) writings considered to represent the best standards of a given literary tradition....

canon

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Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
454 words

... The term “canon” became usual only in the Carolingian period, when the rule of Aachen was drawn up ( 817 ) for religious communities that refused to follow the example of St Chrodegang 's clerics at Metz and adopt a monastic lifestyle. Canons were subject to common life in praying, eating and sleeping, but unlike monks they could have possessions, and a part of the community's revenues, the Prebend , was assigned to them personally. From the mid 11 th c., certain communities of canons came closer to the monastic ideal. Reformed houses had a...

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