You are looking at 1-20 of 39 entries  for:

  • All: Calcutta Cup x
clear all

View:

Overview

Calcutta Cup

A trophy competed for annually between the rugby union national sides of England and Scotland. It was first played for in 1879, having been presented to the Rugby Football Union the ...

Calcutta Cup

Calcutta Cup   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sports Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
90 words

... Cup A trophy competed for annually between the rugby union national sides of England and Scotland. It was first played for in 1879 , having been presented to the Rugby Football Union the previous year by the Calcutta Rugby Club, which had been formed in India in 1873 after a game of rugby between twenty Englishmen and twenty Scots or Celts. When the club disbanded, it used its funds to commission the cup, which has in the 20th century been contested within the programme of the Six Nations...

Calcutta Cup

Calcutta Cup  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A trophy competed for annually between the rugby union national sides of England and Scotland. It was first played for in 1879, having been presented to the Rugby Football Union the previous year by ...
Calcutta

Calcutta (India, USA)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...in a small room—the so-called Black Hole of Calcutta; only a few survived. The city was recaptured the following year by Robert Clive ( 1725–74 ), later 1st Baron Clive of Plassey, who went on to defeat the Nawab at the Battle of Plassey in June, thus securing the future of the East India Company’s operations in Bengal. Calcutta was one of three Presidencies of the Company (the others were Bombay and Madras) and was the capital of British India between 1772 and 1912 . The city gave its name to the Calcutta Cup, the trophy given to the victor in the annual...

Roy, Tarun

Roy, Tarun (1928–88)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Indian Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
396 words

...peyala coffee (‘A Cup of Coffee’), both hits on the Rungmahal public stage in 1959 , Pureo ja pore na (‘It Burns but Does Not Get Burnt’, 1965 , on a fire that damaged Theatre Centre), Bidehi (‘Bodiless’, 1966 ), Agantuk (‘Stranger’, 1967 , at Biswaroopa Theatre), Kencho khurte sap (‘Snake from an Earthworm's Hole’, 1969 ), Parajita nayak (‘Defeated Hero’, 1970 ; taken to France and England, 1975 ), and Athacha Sanjukta (‘Yet Sanjukta’, 1972 ). A professor at the Department of Drama, Rabindra Bharati University, Calcutta, Roy initiated the...

geophagy

geophagy   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...clay consumed by the women of Bengal is a fine, light ochreous-colored specimen fashioned into thin cups with a perforation in the center … and which emits a curious smoky odor. It is this particular odor which makes it such a favourite with delicate women. … Formerly these cups were hawked about in the streets of Calcutta. … Such a street vendor of baked clay cups once figured in a Bengali play; … she recommended her ware in a song, pointing out that her cups are well baked, crisp to eat and yet cheap, and that delicate ladies about to become mothers should...

Manjīrā

Manjīrā   Reference library

Alastair Dick

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
286 words

... Small paired cup cymbals of northern and western India and Pakistan. They are of gunmetal, an alloy of brass with a high proportion of tin, zinc, and so on, and are generally connected by a long string. They are struck principally edge against edge to produce a bright, shimmering tone, and are used mainly in accompaniment to the Hindu devotional singing bhajan. In Kathiawar, Gujarat, cymbal playing has, in the words of Bake (1957), ‘been raised to an independent art’. The Gujarati manjīrā are about 6 cm in diameter and 2 mm thick. The main cup, about 1.5 cm...

rugby football

rugby football   Reference library

Nicholas J. Bryars

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
439 words

...Rugby league also gave rise to a large number of amateur clubs. The first rugby union international match was played at Raeburn Place (Edinburgh) in 1871 between Scotland and England, and the Calcutta Cup was introduced in 1879 . The spread of the game to the former dominions and some unlikely spots such as Romania allowed the introduction of World Cup competitions in the 1980s. Rugby league made little progress in southern England but spread to Australia, New Zealand, and France, allowing international ‘test’ competitions. The two codes, amateur and...

polo

polo   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sports Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
284 words

...exist of variants of the sport being played in ancient cultures, including Persia, Arabia, Byzantine Greece, Japan, and China. Its modern form was established by British army officers who discovered the sport in Assam, India, in the 1850s. The first polo club was established in Calcutta in 1862 , and the game spread beyond the British cavalry to become a source of status among Indian princes. Hounslow Heath, west London, was the venue for Britain's first polo match between the Tenth Hussars and the Ninth Lancers. British teams dominated the polo event at the...

Tāl

Tāl   Reference library

Alastair Dick and Pribislav Pitoëff

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
640 words

...metre in traditional, religious, and art musics. The North Indian form of the word is generally tāl ; the South Indian is tāḷam . There are two principal types: cup-cymbals, generally small and without a rim, and rim-cymbals, with a central depression. Following Kothari (who calls them ‘metal clappers’), rim-cymbals may be divided into two sub-types, medium-sized and large. The cup-cymbals are generally small, about 5 cm to 10 cm in diameter, 1.5 to 2 cm deep, and 2 to 3 mm thick. They are clashed mainly on the edges, and their tone is bright and...

Pinākī

Pinākī   Reference library

Joep Bor

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
899 words

...to it and a hollow cup inverted, is attached at either end. It is played like the ghichak , but in the left hand a small gourd is held which is used in playing’. The pināk lost its appeal in Hindustani music when the sāraṅgī gained in popularity, but it was not ignored by later musicologists and is also depicted on a rāgamālā painting from Bundi ( c 1725). Indeed, this relic of medieval times survived until the end of the 18th century. The Flemish painter François Baltazard Solvyns made a drawing of a pināk he saw in Calcutta and provided a lengthy...

Nagāṙā

Nagāṙā   Reference library

Alastair Dick, Carol M. Babiracki, and Andrew Alter

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
1,989 words

...central Himalayas from at least the 13th century. Bibliography Abu’l Fazl : Ā’īn-i-ākbarī ( c 1590); trans. H. Blochmann in The Naqqarahkhanah and the Imperial Musicians (Calcutta, 1875, 2/1927), 680ff N.A. Willard : A Treatise on the Music of Hindustan (Calcutta, 1834); repr. in S.M. Tagore, Hindu Music from Various Authors (Calcutta, 1875, enlarged 2/1882/ R 1965) S.C. Roy : The Orāons of Chōtā Nāgpur (Ranchi, 1915), 181–2 J. Hoffmann and A. van Emelen : Encyclopaedia mundarica (Patna, 1938–50), 2369–70, 2908ff K.S. Kothari...

Exhibitions

Exhibitions   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
948 words

...Universelles ( 1855 , 1867 , 1878 , 1889 , 1900 ), London ( 1862 , annually 1871–74 , 1886 , 1899 ), Dublin ( 1865 ), Vienna ( 1873 ), Philadelphia ( 1876 ), Amsterdam ( 1883 , at which Victoria alone distributed a staggering 60 000 handbooks and statistical pamphlets), Calcutta ( 1883–84 ), New Orleans ( 1884–85 ), and Chicago ( 1893 ). The earliest Australian exhibitions ( 1854–76 ) were either previews of the merchandise assembled to represent Australia at these international forums, or else limited to inter-colonial participation. The most important...

Banam

Banam   Reference library

Carol M. Babiracki

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
961 words

...: Encyclopaedia Mundarica , vol.5 (Patna, 1938–50), 360–1 K.S. Kothari : Indian Folk Musical Instruments (New Delhi, 1968), 69–70 L. Miśra : Bhāratīya sangītavādya (New Delhi, 1973), 181ff B.C. Deva : Musical Instruments of India: their History and Development (Calcutta, 1978), 168–9 Carol M. Babiracki ...

Mā̃dar

Mā̃dar   Reference library

Carol M. Babiracki

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
1,105 words

... (double-headed drum), perhaps some ḍulki (double-headed drum), and cua̱ or manjīrā (cup cymbals). The ḍulki has gradually replaced the dumaṅg as the lead drum in the dance ground. The dumaṅg , however, still holds a position of honour in Muṇḍā processions, rituals, festivals, and in song texts, where it is often paired with the ḍulki and sometimes with the rabaga . Bibliography S.C. Roy : The Orāons of Chōtā Nāgpur (Calcutta, 1915), 181, 284, 288–9 J. Hoffmann and A. van Emelen : Encyclopaedia Mundarica , vol.4 (Patna...

rugby

rugby   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Scottish History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,046 words

...With wins over Wales, Ireland, and France, this time it was England which had to be beaten to gain the Grand Slam, the Triple Crown, and the Calcutta Cup. England came up to Murrayfield favourites to win all three themselves, having also won all their previous games. In the event Tony Stanger scored a famous try just after half‐time, and Scotland held on to win 13–7. Scotland reached the semi‐final of the Rugby World Cup in 1991 , and this time met England at Murrayfield for a place in the final. A Rob Andrew drop goal with only a few minutes remaining left...

Paṭaha

Paṭaha   Reference library

Alastair Dick

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
1,255 words

...around it. The left hoop has seven holes, each loosely attached by fine cord to a metal cup ( kalaśa ) four fingers (8 cm) long, ‘of gold etc’. These are clearly loud jingles, for they would touch the metal band mentioned above. The lacings are cords ( guṇa ) running from one face to another, thus probably in a V-pattern, but tuned by iron rings (i.e. tension-loops) which convert the lacing to a Y-pattern. The ends of the cord are attached in some way to the metal cups. Other writers are quoted to the effect that the mārga paṭaha may be played by stick or...

Vīṇā

Vīṇā   Reference library

Alastair Dick, Gordon Geekie, Richard Widdess, and Philippe Bruguière

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
7,587 words

... Abu’l Faẓl : Ā’īn-ī-akbarī ( c 1590); trans. F. Gladwin (1783); trans. H.S. Jarrett, rev. J. Sarkar in Saṅgīt , Bibliotheca Indica, vol.270 (Calcutta, 1948), 260ff A. Halim : Muslim Contribution to The Development of North Indian Music (Bombay, 1948–9) L.E.R. Picken : ‘The Origins of the Short Lute’, GSJ , vol.8 (1955), 32–42 Bharata : Nāṭyaśastra (4th–5th centuries); ed. M. Ghosh, ii (Calcutta, 1956; Eng. trans., 1961); ed. M. Ramakrishna Kavi and J. S. Pade , vol.4 (Baroda, 1964) Śārṅgadeva : Saṅgītaratnākara (13th century); ed. S. Subrahmanya...

Sitār

Sitār   Reference library

Alastair Dick

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
5,272 words
Illustration(s):
1

... Abu’l Fazl : Ā’īn-akbarī (c1590), trans. H. Blochmann in The Imperial Musicians (Calcutta, 1873, 2/1927), 680ff; trans. H. Jarrett, rev. J. Sarkar in Saṅgīt , Bibliotheca indica, vol.252 (Calcutta, 1948), 260ff K.M. Gosvami : Saṅgīt-sār (Calcutta, 1868) [in Bengali] S.M. Tagore : Yantra-ksetra-dīpikā (Calcutta, 1872) [in Bengali] S.M. Tagore : Yantra-koś (Calcutta, 1875/ R 1977) [in Bengali] B.K. Roy Choudhury : Bhāratiya-saṅgīt-koś (Calcutta, 1965) [in Bengali]; (New Delhi, 1975) [in Hindi] B.S. Śarma : Sitār-mālikā (Hathras, 3/1966)...

Indian English

Indian English   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Language reference, History of English, Linguistics
Length:
2,652 words

...The use of English dates from the trading ‘factories’ started by the Company: Surat ( 1612 ), Madras ( 1639–40 ), Bombay ( 1674 ), Calcutta ( 1690 ). European traders at that time used a form of portuguese , current since Portugal had acquired Goa in 1510 . Missionaries were important in the diffusion of English in the 18c: schools such as St Mary’s Charity Schools were started in Madras ( 1715 ), Bombay ( 1719 ), and Calcutta ( 1720–31 ). By the 1830s, an influential group of Indians was impressed with Western thought and culture, and its scientific...

Sports

Sports   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
4,037 words
Illustration(s):
1

...led to the establishment of cricket's Ashes series, to the success of the Japanese schoolboys who humiliated the American baseball players of the Yokohama Athletic Club in 1896 , to the defeat of the East Yorkshire regiment by a native Bengali soccer team in the Calcutta Football Association Cup in 1911 , the cultural impact of beating the dominating power at its own game should not be underestimated. As the twentieth century progressed, sports were increasingly employed to enhance the image of extremist political regimes such as Nazi Germany (through the...

View: