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Caladbolg

Subject: Religion

[Ir. calad, hard]. Also In Caladbolg. The lightning sword belonging to several early Irish heroes, notably Fergus mac Róich. With it Fergus chops off the tops of three hills in ...

Caladbolg

Caladbolg   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... [Ir. calad , hard]. Also In Caladbolg. The lightning sword belonging to several early Irish heroes, notably Fergus mac Róich . With it Fergus chops off the tops of three hills in Meath . Fergus mac Léti has a sword much like it called Caladhcholg. Several commentators have seen it as an anticipation of the Arthurian Excalibur . See also CALEDFWLCH...

Caladbolg

Caladbolg  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[Ir. calad, hard].Also In Caladbolg. The lightning sword belonging to several early Irish heroes, notably Fergus mac Róich. With it Fergus chops off the tops of three hills in Meath. Fergus mac Léti ...
Fergus mac Róich

Fergus mac Róich  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
One of the greatest of all Ulster heroes, best known for (a) being tutor to Cúchulainn; (b) losing his throne to Conchobar mac Nessa through the treachery of Ness; (c) encouraging Deirdre and Noíse ...
Fergus mac Léti

Fergus mac Léti  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Mythical king of early Ulster, probable double of the better-known Fergus mac Róich, whose fantastic story, Echtra Fergusa maic Léite [The Saga (or Adventure) of Fergus mac Léti] exists in two widely ...
Caledfwlch

Caledfwlch   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...for Arthur 's sword in several Welsh Arthurian narratives, one of many anticipations of Excalibur . In Culhwch ac Olwen it is listed as one of Arthur's most cherished possessions and is used by Llenlleawg Wyddel to kill Diwrnach Wyddel and his men. See also the Irish CALADBOLG...

Claidheamh Soluis

Claidheamh Soluis   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...poor widow to find the Claidheamh Soluis under the head of another giant. The unreformed ModIr. spelling Claidheamh Soluis, preferred by P. H. Pearse and other rebels of the 1916 Rising, is still more often seen than the reformed Claíomh Solais; also Cruaidín Catuchenn. See caladbolg...

Excalibur

Excalibur   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...parallels in Celtic traditions. The English spelling of the name is ultimately derived from the Welsh Caledfwlch , which is cited in Welsh Arthuriana, such as Culhwch ac Olwen . Caledfwlch is nearly identical with the Breton Kaledvoulc'h and is comparable with the Irish Caladbolg...

Excalibur

Excalibur   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
109 words

...of Monmouth ); King Arthur's sword, which he drew out of a stone when no one else could move it or which was given to him by the Lady of the Lake ( Malory , Bk I). Malory says that the name means ‘cut‐steel’, but the Welsh form in the Mabinogion is related to the Irish Caladbolg (battlesword), a famous legendary sword. According to Malory, when Arthur was mortally wounded in the last battle, he ordered Sir Bedevere to throw Excalibur into the lake. A hand rose from the water, took the sword, and...

Excalibur

Excalibur   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...The name of King arthur ’s sword (Old French Escalibor ), called by Geoffrey of Monmouth Caliburnus (as if from Latin chalybs , ‘steel’). There was also a legendary Irish sword called Caladbolg (‘hard belly’), so named as it was ‘voracious’ and capable of consuming anything. According to Sir Thomas Malory ’s Le Morte d’Arthur ( 1470 ), Arthur was acclaimed king when he was the only person who could pull the sword from a great stone in which it had been magically fixed. Hence the title of T.H. White ’s story for children based on the legend, The...

Excalibur

Excalibur   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
110 words

...of Monmouth ); King Arthur 's sword, which he drew out of a stone when no one else could move it or which was given to him by the Lady of the Lake ( Malory , Bk I). Malory says that the name means ‘cut‐steel’, but the Welsh form in the Mabinogion is related to the Irish Caladbolg (battlesword), a famous legendary sword. According to Malory, when Arthur was mortally wounded in the last battle, he ordered Sir Bedevere to throw Excalibur into the lake. A hand rose from the water, took the sword, and...

Fergus mac Róich

Fergus mac Róich   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...possibly from Ro-ech [i.e. great horse]. He had huge genitalia, requiring seven women to satisfy him. Fál , the upright stone at Tara , was known in 19th-century oral tradition as Bod Fhearghais [Ir., Fergus's penis] , perhaps implying Fergus mac Róich. His great sword is Caladbolg . Most of our perception of Fergus's persona is drawn from his description in the Táin , augmented by both earlier and later texts. Fergus is king of Ulster, resident at Emain Macha , when he falls in love with Ness, the daughter of Eochaid Sálbuide . She agrees to marry...

Fergus mac Léti

Fergus mac Léti   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

..., in Loch Rudraige, which turns his mouth to the back of his head, disqualifying him from the kingship. His secret is revealed by his wife, when they quarrel over the use of a bath stone. In a second encounter with the monster, Fergus slays it with his sword caladhcholg ( see CALADBOLG ), but not before it has torn out his heart. Fergus mac Léti's identification with Fergus mac Róich comes from their both being kings of Ulster and swimmers, and from their possession of powerful swords. D. A. Binchy has suggested that, despite the fantastic elements in Fergus...

Cúchulainn

Cúchulainn   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...to cool him; the first he explodes, the second he boils, and the third he warms. His son is Connla (1) , unknowingly begotten upon Aífe . In later literature he is ascribed a daughter, Fínscoth . Cúchulainn's chief weapon is his spear, the Gáe Bulga . His usual sword is Caladbolg , although in later oral tradition he is described as wielding the Claidheamh Soluis [Ir., sword of light] , which may also be known as Cruaidin Catutchenn. His favourite horse is the Liath Macha [Grey of Macha], but he also likes Saingliu or Dubh Sainglenn. His...

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