You are looking at 1-20 of 312 entries  for:

  • All: Buffalo Soldiers x
clear all

View:

Overview

Buffalo Soldiers

The first black regiments in the regular army, established by Congress on July 1866. Originally the 9th and 10th Calvary and the 38th, 39th, 40th, and 41st Infantry Regiments, in ...

Buffalo Soldiers

Buffalo Soldiers   Reference library

Frank N. Schubert

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...because the buffalo was essential to these tribes the name was probably a sign of respect and that the soldiers accepted it as such. This has not been proved, and the origins and significance of the name remain obscure. There is no evidence to indicate that the soldiers themselves used or referred to “buffalo soldiers,” so claims concerning their views of the usage also remain unproved. The Tenth Cavalry adopted the buffalo as a central element of its unit crest, but not until 1911 . General awareness of the participation of black soldiers in the westward...

Buffalo soldiers

Buffalo soldiers   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... soldiers the first black regiments in the regular army, established by Congress on July 1866 . Originally the 9th and 10th Calvary and the 38th, 39th, 40th, and 41st Infantry Regiments, in 1869 the 38th and the 41st were merged into the 24th Infantry Regiment and the 39th and 40th were merged into the 25th Infantry Regiment. They served mostly at the frontier, but also fought in Cuba, in the Philippine War , and in Mexican border skirmishes. The name “Buffalo” was first applied to the 10th Calvary Regiment about 1870 by the Cheyenne . Supposedly...

Buffalo Soldiers

Buffalo Soldiers   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
706 words
Illustration(s):
1

... Soldiers African American involvement with the U.S. military unofficially dates back to the American Revolution; officially, black soldiers began serving in the army during the Civil War. With the success of segregated units like the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Infantry, African Americans solidified their place as a part of the U.S. Army. From this foundation arose the Buffalo Soldiers. The Buffalo Soldiers consisted of the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Infantries and the Ninth and Tenth Cavalries. These African American units served all along the...

“Buffalo” Soldiers

“Buffalo” Soldiers   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...seen a similarity between the curly hair and the dark skin of the soldiers and the buffalo. Soon the Ninth's troopers also became known as buffalo soldiers, and ultimately the infantrymen too came to be considered buffalo soldiers. Many writers contend that the name reflected the Indians' respect for the soldiers, but Native American commentators disagree. [See also African Americans in the Military ; Army, U.S.: 1866–99 ; Plains Indians Wars .] William H. Leckie , The Buffalo Soldiers: A Narrative of the Negro Cavalry in the West , 1967. Arlen L....

Buffalo Soldiers

Buffalo Soldiers  

The first black regiments in the regular army, established by Congress on July 1866. Originally the 9th and 10th Calvary and the 38th, 39th, 40th, and 41st Infantry Regiments, in ...
buffalo soldier

buffalo soldier noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
21 words
Fort Sill

Fort Sill  

A fort near Lawton, Oklahoma, staked out in 1869 to stop Native American tribes from attacking settlers along the borders with Texas and Kansas and to keep order in the ...
James Henry Beard

James Henry Beard  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(probably 1811–93).Painter. A specialist in genre subjects, together with his brother William Holbrook Beard (1824–1900), he introduced a form of social satire in which animals stand for human ...
Army Reorganization Act

Army Reorganization Act  

1 (1866) an act passed by Congress on July 28, 1866, after the Civil War, to allocate six regiments, the 9th and 10th Cavalry and the 38th, 39th, 40th, and ...
Military Families

Military Families  

Reference type:
Overview Page
“If the Army had wanted you to have a wife, it would have issued you one!” This often quoted dictum reflects a historical truth: until recently, military families have been ...
Oregon Trail

Oregon Trail  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Autobiographical narrative by Parkman, serialized in The Knickerbocker Magazine (1847) and issued in book form as The California and Oregon Trail (1849). The original title was resumed in later ...
Ethnicity and Race in the Military

Ethnicity and Race in the Military  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Ethnicity and race have been less troubling military questions for the United States than for nations where ethnic and racial competition, political power struggles, or caste systems have had a ...
African-American troops

African-American troops  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Variously called negro, coloured, and black, the history of African-American soldiers is that of US race relations in general. Even after the abolition of formal discrimination by colour, advancement ...
Military

Military  

The African American contribution to victories in the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812 was substantial. African American ground forces in the Revolutionary War numbered about five thousand, and ...
African Americans

African Americans  

A citizen or resident of the United States whose ancestry can be traced to Africa. A term intended to avoid the pejorative associations of words such as “negro” and “black.” An estimated 10 to 12 ...
buffalo hunt

buffalo hunt   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
557 words

...of buffalo, a high level of discipline was maintained by the elected hunt captains and their soldiers. When either the enemy or buffalo were spotted, an order was given and the columns of carts, often 8 or 9 km long, wheeled to form an enclosed circle to corral the horses and protect the women and children. If buffalo were sighted, the men would mount their fastest horse and ride into the herd with their mouths filled with shot and pockets full of powder. A good hunter on an experienced horse could kill 10–12 animals on a run. The rising demand for buffalo...

Ingraham, Prentiss

Ingraham, Prentiss (1843–1904)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
72 words

...Prentiss ( 1843–1904 ), son of Joseph Holt Ingraham , after service in the Civil War and as a soldier of fortune in Mexico, Austria, Crete, and Cuba became a popular writer like his father. The Masked Spy ( 1872 ) was the first of more than 600 dime novels he wrote under his own name and many pseudonyms, perhaps 200 of the novels about his friend Buffalo Bill . He also wrote several popular...

pemmican

pemmican   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...The traditional iron rations of Native Americans, made of dried buffalo or other meat pounded to a paste, mixed with fat and often fruit, especially cranberries, and shaped into small cakes. Carried on hunting trips, it could last almost indefinitely. The term has been taken over for a similar but rather less ethnic mixture of beef and dried fruit, used as emergency rations by explorers, soldiers, etc. in the Arctic. In origin it is a Cree word, pimikân , based on pimii ‘grease,...

Ingraham, Prentiss

Ingraham, Prentiss (1843–1904)   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...Prentiss ( 1843–1904 ) adventurer , born in Adams County, Mississippi . Ingraham fought briefly for the Confederacy during the Civil War but is known mainly as a soldier of fortune and writer. As a prolific writer of dime novel westerns, Ingraham helped shape the image of the cowboy in American popular culture and promoted the popular phenomenon of Buffalo Bill, about whom he began writing in 1876...

Fort Sill

Fort Sill   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...along the borders with Texas and Kansas and to keep order in the area. Campaigns involved frontier scouts such as “Buffalo Bill” Cody and “Wild Bill” Hickok and included the Red River Campaign , which was launched in response to tribal warfare in 1874 . Geronimo and 341 other Apache prisoners were brought to the fort in 1894 ; Geronimo died and was buried there in 1909 . Troops camping at Fort Sill included the Buffalo soldiers , black regiments that built many of the stone structures still standing on the site, and Troop L of the 7th Cavalry, a...

View: