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British and Irish fairy tales

1. The medieval period English fantasy could be said to have its beginning in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf, the best-known early work in English literature, generally dated ...

British and Irish fairy tales

British and Irish fairy tales   Reference library

Gillian Avery

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature
Length:
5,483 words

...of 1890 and 1893 . Neil Philip in The Penguin Book of English Folktales ( 1992 ) summarizes the work done by English collectors. The Scots and Irish had always shown far more interest than the English in their folklore and native tales. For his Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry ( 1888 ), William Butler Yeats drew on material from many collectors of the past such as Croker and Patrick Kennedy , and expressed particular admiration for ‘the pathos and tenderness’ of Lady (Jane Francesca) Wilde ’s Ancient Legends of Ireland ( 1887 ). He...

British and Irish fairy tales

British and Irish fairy tales   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
5,058 words

...of 1890 and 1893 . Neil Philip in The Penguin Book of English Folktales ( 1992 ) summarizes the work done by English collectors. The Scots and Irish had always shown far more interest than the English in their folklore and native tales. For his Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry ( 1888 ), William Butler Yeats drew on material from many collectors of the past such as Croker and Patrick Kennedy , and expressed particular admiration for ‘the pathos and tenderness’ of Lady (Jane Francesca) Wilde's Ancient Legends of Ireland ( 1887 ). He...

British and Irish fairy tales

British and Irish fairy tales  

1. The medieval periodEnglish fantasy could be said to have its beginning in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf, the best-known early work in English literature, generally dated in the ...
Novels

Novels   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,137 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of Fiction ( 1814 ), which begins with early Greek romance and ends with the novels of the past 100 years in Britain and France. The chapters of the book (‘Origins of Spiritual Romance’, ‘Comic Romance’, ‘Pastoral Romance’, ‘Fairy Tales’, ‘Voyages Imaginaires’, and others) reminded readers of the form's genealogy and variety, implicitly setting modern fiction in a complex and earnest formal context. Dunlop's work is a key indicator of the shifting status of the novel in the Romantic period, and of its search for a distinct genealogy which would define the...

The Antiquarian Tradition

The Antiquarian Tradition   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,837 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...tales of witchcraft , wisemen , fairies , and hobgoblins, and the customs surrounding weddings, births, and burials . His archival searches and observations as a field archaeologist provided him with the perspective to view continuity and change. He was different from earlier scholars in his breadth of outlook and in his concern with the ordinary families of his parish. His Forty Years in a Moorland Parish ( 1891 ) can be classified as social anthropology, anticipating many of the concerns of the local historians of the late 20th century. The 18th and...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,654 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...by John Campbell of Islay with his Popular Tales of the West Highlands, Orally Collected ( 1860–2 ) and by Patrick Kennedy , The Bardic Stories of Ireland ( 1871 ). These developments, and those of the third stage, are usefully surveyed by Richard M. Dorson , The British Folklorists: A History ( 1968 ). †‘Folklore’ itself was a term coined as late as 1846 , though it rapidly caught on. A great surge of activity, indeed, marked the years between the foundation of the Folklore Society itself in 1878 and the First World War. It was during this period,...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,520 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...dazzled by the fairy-tale splendour of the Vauxhall *pleasure gardens ; they placed bets at Tattersalls; they tried to visit the Beggar's Bush, a famous rogues' tavern and vaudeville at Holborn; and they exercised sensibility by giving money to a poignant African beggar, who may even have been the actual Billy Waters, celebrated ‘King of the Beggars’, whom Egan had inserted in his mixed fictive and documentary account. As a woman in humble circumstances, Southcott typically had far less exposure to literature than male counterparts like Clare and Egan—her early...

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...vets of their time and therefore in close contact with animals, as were also blacksmiths and horsemen, who similarly were regarded as capable of at least limited magical prowess (see George Ewart Evans, The Horse in the Furrow (1960) ). Variations on the human shape were projected onto the supernatural. Ghosts of the already dead and wraiths of the future dead were commonplace elements in popular apprehension, while fantastical, distorted versions of human society in the forms of giants, fairies , boggarts, or mermaids and mermen, for example, all...

Margaret Gatty

Margaret Gatty  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
née(1809–1873) British children's writer, poet, and editorThe Fairy Godmothers, and Other Tales (1851) Children's Fiction‘Worlds Not Realized’ (1856) FictionThe Poor Incumbent (1858) FictionAunt ...
Samuel Lover

Samuel Lover  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1797–1868) Irish novelist, songwriter, and portrait painterRory O'More (1837) FictionHandy Andy (1842) FictionL.S.D.; or, Treasure Trove (1844) FictionMetrical Tales, and Other Poems (1860) ...
Thomas Crofton Croker

Thomas Crofton Croker  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1798–1854),an Irish antiquary, probably the first collector to regard national and folk stories as a literary art. His Researches in the South of Ireland (1824), Fairy Legends and Traditions in the ...
fairies

fairies  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A poetic or literary word for fairyland, a pseudo-archaism introduced by Edmund Spenser (c1552–99) in his allegorical poem The Faerie Queene, celebrating Queen Elizabeth.
Dinah Maria Craik

Dinah Maria Craik  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1826–87)Née Mulock, a prolific writer of novels, poems, children's books, fairy‐tales, essays, and short stories. Born in Hartshill, Staffordshire, she received some education at Brampton House ...
Andrew Lang

Andrew Lang  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1844–1912),born at Selkirk, was educated at St Andrews University and became a fellow of Merton College, Oxford. In 1875 he settled in London, becoming one of the most prolific and versatile writers ...
Jean Ingelow

Jean Ingelow  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1820–97),poet, published several volumes of verse and some stories for children; her best‐known poems are ‘Divided’ and ‘The High Tide on the Coast of Lincolnshire, 1571’, both in Poems (1863).
Algernon Blackwood

Algernon Blackwood  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1869–1951),short‐story writer and novelist: b. London (Crayford). John Silence 1908, A Prisoner of Fairyland 1913, Tales of the Uncanny and Supernatural 1949.
Frances Hodgson Burnett

Frances Hodgson Burnett  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1849–1924), Anglo-American novelist and children's writer.Burnett published a number of undistinguished fairy tales, such as Queen Silver-Bell (1906), and these have been deservedly forgotten. An ...
Angela Carter

Angela Carter  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
1940–1992)British writer whose imaginative novels, which blend fantasy with realism, have won her a cult following.Born in Eastbourne, Angela Stalker was brought up in Yorkshire and London, failed to ...
Ford Madox Ford

Ford Madox Ford  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
1873–1939)British novelist and critic.Ford's mother was the daughter of the Pre-Raphaelite painter Ford Madox Brown; his father was a German music critic, Francis Hueffer, who moved to England in ...
A. S. Byatt

A. S. Byatt  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1936– )Novelist and critic, born in Sheffield, and educated at the Mount School, York, and Newnham College, Cambridge. Her first novel, Shadow of a Sun (1964), describes a woman attempting ...

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