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Billy Bishop Goes to War

A: John Gray with Eric Peterson Pf: 1978, Vancouver Pb: 1981 G: ...

Billy Bishop Goes to War

Billy Bishop Goes to War (1978)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Plays (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Bishop Goes to War Author: John Gray with Eric Peterson Date/place of 1st performance: 1978 , Vancouver Date of 1st publication: 1981 Genre: Drama in 2 acts; prose with songs Setting/time of action: Canada, England, and France, 1914–18; Canada, 1939 Cast: 2m, playing 17m, 2f Billy Bishop tells the story of his involvement in the First World War. In 1914 he proves an unpromising recruit at the Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario. In 1915 he is transferred to an army camp in England, volunteers for the Royal Flying Corps, and is...

Billy Bishop Goes to War

Billy Bishop Goes to War  

A: John Gray with Eric Peterson Pf: 1978, Vancouver Pb: 1981 G: Drama in 2 acts; prose with songs S: Canada, England, and France, 1914–18; Canada, 1939 C: 2m, playing 17m, 2fBilly Bishop tells the ...
John Gray

John Gray  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1946– )Canadian playwright and composer. His best-known play, Billy Bishop Goes to War (1978, Broadway 1980), is a two-person musical that examines the ambiguous attitudes of Canada's most famous ...
Gray, John

Gray, John (26 Sept. 1946)   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
103 words

...John (b. Ottawa , 26 Sept. 1946 ) Playwright and composer . After theatre experience in Vancouver, Gray moved to Toronto in 1975 where his first musical, 18 Wheels , was premièred in 1977 . His greatest success, Billy Bishop Goes to War ( 1978 ), written with Eric Peterson , is a musical based on the life of the First World War Canadian flying ace. Rock and Roll ( 1981 ), a musical about 1960s rock bands, was complemented by Don Messer's Jubilee ( 1985 ), a musical about a famous Canadian traditional fiddler. Amelia ( 1994 ), about the...

Mabinogi

Mabinogi   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...powers, Gwydion can discern that his brother is smitten with the beautiful Goewin , a girl whose ceremonial duty is to hold the feet of the king, unless he be away for war. Gwydion proposes a complicated plan to allow Gilfaethwy to be with his heart's desire-part of which requires Math to go to war and leave his foot-holder behind. Gwydion promises to obtain some of the swine of Pryderi, animals new to the kingdom, whose meat is reputed to be sweeter than beef. With ten companions he sets off for Dyfed disguised as a bard . Although this charms Pryderi, the...

The Cold War and American Religion

The Cold War and American Religion   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Religion in America

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Religion
Length:
14,207 words

...that one side could win a nuclear war and that we must be prepared to fight one and to win it. When we have that kind of thinking going on, it seems to me we are getting ever more close to the day when we will wage that nuclear war and it will be the war that will end the world as we know it. 98 Reagan resurrected the Truman-Eisenhower morality play presentation of the Cold War as a Manichaean conflict. He emulated Eisenhower in recognizing the electoral importance of Christian voters. Billy Graham had advised Eisenhower to run for the presidency, telling...

Canada: theatre in English

Canada: theatre in English   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,561 words

...specialized issues – feminism, children's theatre (there are now some 60 professional theatres for young people), homosexuality – and there has been a dramatic increase in low-budget theatre favouring the one-actor show. Significant examples here include John Gray 's Billy Bishop Goes to War , which played London and New York after great success in Canada, and Antonine Maillet 's La Sagouine as performed by Viola Léger (in French and English). The attendant and necessary infrastructure of professional organizations, theatre publishers, professional...

Strategy

Strategy   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...planes, and victory would go to the side that got in the first blow. While Douhet's arguments were extreme, heavy emphasis on bombardment was common among early airpower pioneers, notably Gen. Hugh Trenchard , the first head of the Royal Air Force. Meanwhile, in America, Brig. Gen. Billy Mitchell , drawing on his experience as commander of the American Expeditionary Force's air component in 1917–18 , had conceived a more pragmatic theory. While Mitchell, like Douhet, believed that airpower would be decisive in future wars, he considered bombardment as...

Culture, Entertainment, and Religion in America

Culture, Entertainment, and Religion in America   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Religion in America

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Religion
Length:
9,965 words
Illustration(s):
8

...gospel music, in the 1950s. Billy Graham’s revival campaigns around the globe won him enthusiastic support and the largest audience of any religious figure in the world, with the exception of the Pope. (In the early 1970s, Graham, a former critic of rock and roll, even reached out to the Jesus People and lent his support to Christian rock.) Critics, bristling at Graham’s simple gospel message and his flashy technique, thought his crusades had a circus-like quality to them. John Steinbeck sarcastically referred to Graham as one of the two “great men”...

Gay Literature: Poetry and Prose

Gay Literature: Poetry and Prose   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
7,040 words

...to homosexual ideals in the twentieth century. His “position” among the crew, wrote Melville, was something analogous to that of a rustic beauty transplanted from the provinces and brought into competition with the highborn dames of the court…. Cast in a mould peculiar to the finest physical examples of those Englishmen in whom the Saxon strain would seem not at all to partake of any Norman or other admixture, he showed in face that humane look of reposeful good nature which the Greek sculptor in some instances gave to his heroic strong man, Hercules. Billy's...

Evangelism, Mission, and Crusade in American Religion

Evangelism, Mission, and Crusade in American Religion   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Religion in America

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Religion
Length:
12,022 words
Illustration(s):
3

...after World War II, was to see the good of the nation and the good of the gospel as largely congruent. In the 1960s, that began to change in some circles. Missionary leaders in the Southern Baptist Convention, for example, argued against segregation and American racism more generally owing to what they perceived as its incompatibility with Christian faith and to the deleterious effects it had on missionary efforts abroad. In 1974 , at a conference in Lausanne Switzerland, American evangelist and proponent of missionary efforts Billy Graham openly...

Religion.

Religion.   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
3,041 words

...group that under Wallace D. Muhammad , son of Elijah Muhammad , found increasing acceptance in the worldwide Muslim community. Alongside the rapid expansion of religions new to the United States, considerable power still attended the traditional faiths. The evangelist Billy Graham , for instance, from the later 1940s through the 1990s, preached his evangelical Protestant message to more people, personally and by electronic means, than any other individual in the two millennia of Christian history. Chicago's Roman Catholic Joseph Cardinal Bernardin (...

Religion

Religion   Reference library

Marty Martin E.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...front came to be called Evangelical. Although the Mainline members failed to take advantage of new opportunities to propagate, not least of all through mass media, Evangelical churches grew rapidly. Although Mainline theologians like Reinhold and H. Richard Niebuhr and German-born Paul Tillich spoke to intellectuals and formulated impressive theologies, Evangelicals like Billy Graham became the celebrities who attracted great crowds. Born largely as reactionary Fundamentalist groups in the 1920s, these descendants made vigorous efforts to attract new...

Religion

Religion   Reference library

William J. BAKER

Berkshire Encyclopedia of World Sport (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
5,528 words

...yoking sports to evangelical Protestantism. The evangelist Billy Graham initiated the practice of having star athletes publicly “share” their conversion experience. Graham appropriately thought of his evangelistic organization as a “team” and frequently used sports stories and metaphors in his sermons. For purposes of association as well as mere space, he selected famous sports venues such as Yankee Stadium, Madison Square Garden, Wembley Stadium (London), Boston Garden, and the Los Angeles Coliseum for his early crusades. Mixed with Cold War rhetoric and a...

Literature

Literature   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
8,101 words

...ranked as the most important novel of the post–World War II era. A new generation of poets that included Elizabeth Bishop , Theodore Roethke , John Berryman , Robert Lowell , James Dickey , Denise Levertov , Richard Wilbur , and Adrienne Rich emerged in the 1940s and 1950s, producing well-made formal poems indebted to Eliot and the New Criticism. But learned formalism soon gave way to looser, more “confessional” poetry in the work of Ginsberg , Anne Sexton , and Sylvia Plath . Acknowledging Bishop's influence in North and South ( 1946 ) and Poems ...

AWARDS

AWARDS   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
11,389 words

...award 1989  Claire Patterson, It’s OK to be You! Feeling Good about Growing Up 1990  Deborah Furley, The Web: The Triumph of a New Zealand Girl over Anorexia 1991  John Reid, Model Boats That Really Go 1992  Peter Garland, The Damselfly 1993  Kim Westerskov, Albatross Adventure 1994  Robyn Kuhukiwa, Paikea 1995  Barbara Cairns and Helen Martin, Shadows on the Wall 1996  Laura Ranger, Laura’s Poems 1997  Diana Noonan, I Spy Wildlife: The Field, photographs by Nic Bishop 1998  Andrew Crowe, The Life-Size Guide to Native Trees and Other Common Plants of...

O'Connor, Flannery

O'Connor, Flannery   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
6,381 words

...of resemblance to her first in that its main character, Francis Marion Tarwater, feels fated to be a preacher. Like Hazel Motes in Wise Blood , Tarwater fights against this sense of predestination; also like Motes before him, Tarwater is transformed and redeemed by violence. Tarwater does not want to become a preacher, but neither does he want to be an intellectual, like his Uncle Rayber, who believes only in nonreligious reason. Still, young Tarwater is drawn to Rayber's retarded son, Bishop, and he comes to believe that it is his duty to baptize the boy....

Religion, Charity, and Philanthropy in America

Religion, Charity, and Philanthropy in America   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Religion in America

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Religion
Length:
13,648 words

...War II may have led to the professionalization of fundraising techniques. While parachurch agencies still compelled donors to contribute out of their religious motivations and because of the religious mission of their organizations, they have learned to combine nonprofit and secular principles alongside a continued reliance on passion and sentimentality. Because of their success and ubiquitous presence in public life, these parachurch agencies came to define American religious life for many Americans. In the 1950s and 1960s it was crusade preacher Billy...

Film Regulation and the Church in America

Film Regulation and the Church in America   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Religion in America

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,464 words

...clergy recognized the ministry potential of film. Churches saw an uptick in attendance at sanctuary screenings that alerted exhibitors to potential competition, but was not enough to convince producers that there was a market for movies substituting as sermons. A cottage industry emerged to supply churches with nontheatrical films that would “preach, teach, and evangelize,” as one scholar puts it. 24 In 1951 , the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association formed World Wide Pictures, which advanced and established the conventions of evangelical filmmaking....

Radio Industry

Radio Industry   Reference library

Black Women in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
4,901 words
Illustration(s):
2

...in New York City that was later syndicated coast-to-coast by ABC, making her the first African American musician to have her own nationally syndicated radio program. She retired because of illness in 1954 . Yvonne Daniels ( c. 1928-1991 ) was a legendary disc jockey, one of the first woman ever to compete successfully at a major market radio station. She was the daughter of jazz singer Billy Daniels and began her career in radio at a rhythm and blues station in Jacksonville, Illinois. She moved from there to WYNR in Chicago and hosted a jazz show that was in...

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