You are looking at 1-12 of 12 entries  for:

  • All: Bapsi Sidhwa x
clear all

View:

Overview

Bapsi Sidhwa

(1938– ), Pakistani novelist, born in Karachi, a member of the tiny Parsi (Zoroastrian) community; Sidhwa grew up in Lahore, where she was educated. Her first published novel, ...

Sidhwa, Bapsi

Sidhwa, Bapsi   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

..., Bapsi ( 1938–  ), Pakistani novelist , born in Karachi, a member of the tiny Parsi (Zoroastrian) community; Sidhwa grew up in Lahore, where she was educated. Her first published novel, The Crow Eaters ( 1978 ), is the carnivalesque chronicle of three generations of a Parsi family, an ambitious blend of satire, farce, social history, and magic realism . A far more sober tale, The Bride ( 1983 ) is a reworking of an earlier, unpublished novel, telling of the tragic marriage of a working-class Lahore woman to a youth from the underdeveloped regions of...

Sidhwa, Bapsi

Sidhwa, Bapsi (1938)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
503 words

..., Bapsi (b. 1938 ), novelist, active member in Pakistani women's organizations, educator. Born in Karachi, Bapsi Sidhwa was educated mainly at home in Lahore, Pakistan, because she had polio as a child. Apparently it was Louisa May Alcott 's Little Women , presented to her on her eleventh birthday, that opened up the world of fiction for her. The oral tradition of storytelling , especially as carried on by women, was also an important influence. She received her B.A. from Kinnaird College for women in Lahore, Pakistan, and has taught at the University...

Bapsi Sidhwa

Bapsi Sidhwa  

(1938– ),Pakistani novelist, born in Karachi, a member of the tiny Parsi (Zoroastrian) community; Sidhwa grew up in Lahore, where she was educated. Her first published novel, The Crow Eaters ...
South Asian–american Women Writing

South Asian–american Women Writing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
At this time in political history, the geographical-cultural area designated as South Asia consists of Bangladesh, India, the Maldive Islands, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Afghanistan is sometimes ...
Anglo-Indian literature

Anglo-Indian literature  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Present‐day India boasts an English language literature of energy and diversity, and has spawned a striking literary diaspora. Some writers of Indian descent (V. S. Naipaul, Bharati Mukherjee) now ...
Mistry, Rohinton

Mistry, Rohinton (b. 1952)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
460 words

...and 1984 . Since then he has published a collection of short stories entitled Tales from Firozsha Baag ( 1987 ) and two novels, Such a long journey ( 1991 ), which won a Governor General's Award, and A fine balance ( 1995 ), which won the Giller Prize. Very few writers— Bapsi Sidhwa ( b.1938 ) is a notable exception—have so consistently and so rigorously dealt with the Parsi community as Mistry has. A Parsi himself, Mistry for the most part has set his fiction in India, and has focused on the aspirations, heroism, weaknesses, and marginality of the Parsi...

Anglo-Indian literature

Anglo-Indian literature   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
613 words

...intense and controversial. From the 1980s, a second literary generation includes Rushdie, its most influential member, and the women writers Gita Mehta ( 1943–  ), Githa Hariharan ( 1954–  ) and Sara Suleri ( 1953 –). Technically Pakistani, Ice-Candy Man ( 1989 ), by Bapsi Sidhwa ( 1938–  ), is an outstanding response to Partition. A number of different modes in the writing are evolving, including the stark realism of Rohinton Mistry , the light, Austen‐esque prose of Seth, the mordant social observation of Upamanyu Chatterjee , the flamboyance of ...

Anglo-Indian literature

Anglo-Indian literature   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
886 words

... ( 1977 ), and India: A Million Mutinies Now ( 1990 ), has been intense and controversial.  From the 1980s, a second literary generation established itself, with Rushdie its most influential member. Technically Pakistani, Ice‐Candy‐Man ( 1989 ), by the novelist Bapsi Sidhwa ( 1938–  ), is an outstanding response to Partition. The work of the US‐based Gita Mehta ( 1943–  ) along with Githa Hariharan ( 1954–  ), Sara Suleri , and others confirms the quality of contemporary writing by Indian women. A number of different modes in the writing are...

South Asian–american Women Writing

South Asian–american Women Writing   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
1,388 words

...is no longer a cultural offering translated for an alien audience. It is an attempt to understand the process of translating one's self to one's self without keeping an anxious eye on explaining one's self to the people of another culture. The concluding chapter of Bapsi Sidhwa 's novel, Cracking India ( 1991 ), begins with a quote from Iqbal asking for “power to talk.” Meena Alexander 's novel, Nampally Road ( 1991 ), concludes with the protagonist looking at the raped woman she has helped, and stating that the woman's “mouth was healing...

Novel

Novel   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
6,238 words
Illustration(s):
1

...by women ( Gauri Deshpande , Shashi Deshpande , Githa Hariharan , Arundhati Roy ), even as globalization has shone a spotlight on South Asian writers in English, particularly writers in the diaspora such as Anita Desai , Amitav Ghosh , and Rohinton Mistry (India); Bapsi Sidhwa , Kamila Shamsie , and Mohsin Hamid (Pakistan); and Romesh Gunesekera , Michael Ondaatje , and Shyam Selvadurai (Sri Lanka). The novel's uneven development in different regions and languages exhibits variations on this general pattern. Bengali writers were influential...

Asian American Literature

Asian American Literature   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
8,272 words

...culture. Her books The Wife ( 1975 ), The Tiger's Daughter ( 1972 ), and Jasmine ( 1989 ) allude to the experiences of upper-class women moving from Calcutta to the United States, their displacement and alienation, and their disillusionment with the “American Dream.” Bapsi Sidhwa , a Pakistani diasporic novelist, reveals attention to women's issues and her own childhood exposure to storytelling: The Crow Eaters ( 1979 ), Cracking India ( 1991 ), and An American Brat ( 1993 ). Other South Asian American writers have found voice through verse. G....

Literary Theory

Literary Theory   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
8,606 words

...the dominant culture. In the field of Asian American studies, theorists note that Asian Americans are a broad and heterogeneous group whose experiences cannot be reduced to a hyphenated identity. Asian American writers such as Maxine Hong Kingston , Amy Tan , Frank Chin , Bapsi Sidhwa , Lois-Ann Yamanaka , and Bharati Mukherjee , as well as theorists Lisa Lowe , Shirley Leok-lin Lim , Yen Le Espiritu , E. San Juan , and Ronald Takaki have analyzed the complex problems of ethnic assimilation, identification, and discrimination, as well as the...

View: