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Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery In

Although it was by and large a slave city, Baltimore boasted a large free black population, which included Frederick Douglass's wife, Anna Murray, who worked for a postman on the ...

Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery In

Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery In   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,662 words

..., Maryland, Slavery In Although it was by and large a slave city, Baltimore boasted a large free black population, which included Frederick Douglass 's wife, Anna Murray , who worked for a postman on the same street where Douglass lived with the Auld family. In the first half of the nineteenth century the free black population of Baltimore increased 3,000 percent, as African Americans were moving to many urban locations for better opportunities and more freedom. Indeed, while Baltimore served as a bastion of freedom for many African Americans in the...

Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery In

Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery In  

Although it was by and large a slave city, Baltimore boasted a large free black population, which included Frederick Douglass's wife, Anna Murray, who worked for a postman on the ...
Maryland

Maryland  

Latinos and Latinas constitute a relatively small but rapidly growing percentage of the total population of Maryland. The 2000 census figures list the Latino and Latina population of the state ...
America

America  

The thirteen colonies later formed the United States of America. All except Georgia, founded in 1732, resulted from 17th‐cent. crown grants, mainly to companies or proprietors. Most were eventually ...
Richard Caton Woodville

Richard Caton Woodville  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1825–55).Painter. A genre specialist, he spent most of his career painting American subjects while living in Europe. Though they are relatively few, he also executed portraits and historical or ...
Douglass, Frederick

Douglass, Frederick (1818–95)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
115 words

..., editor , statesman , and auto-biographer , born a slave in Maryland. He was sent to Baltimore, aged 12, where the wife of his owner taught him to read, and escaped from a later cruel owner in 1838 . His autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave , was published in 1845 to huge acclaim, and led to tours of Great Britain and Ireland. It is the most influential and significant account of a slave's life ever published. Douglass later began an anti‐slavery newspaper, The North Star , advised President Lincoln during...

Saint Michaels, Maryland

Saint Michaels, Maryland   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
309 words

...urban life in Baltimore, Maryland, had made Douglass unfit for plantation labor, Auld sent Douglass to Edward Covey 's farm, about seven miles northwest of Saint Michaels, to be broken. However, an unbroken Douglass returned to Saint Michaels in April 1836 , after his plan to escape slavery was discovered. Douglass stayed on the plantation a few days before Auld sent him to Baltimore to learn the ship-caulking trade. On 16 June 1877 Douglass returned to Saint Michaels, urging blacks to practice thrift and industry as the means of progressing in American...

Maryland

Maryland   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
3,496 words

...American Community of Baltimore, 1790–1860 . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1997. Wagandt, Charles . The Mighty Revolution: Negro Emancipation in Maryland, 1862–1864 . Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1964. A history of the politics of emancipation. Whitman, T. Stephen . The Price of Freedom: Slavery and Manumission in Baltimore and Early National Maryland . Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1997. Frank...

Douglass, Frederick

Douglass, Frederick (1818–95)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
170 words

..., born a slave in Maryland. Douglass speculated that his father may have been a white man, possibly his mother's owner. He was sent to Baltimore, aged 12, where the wife of his owner taught him to read, and escaped from a later cruel owner in 1838 . The abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison ( 1805–79 ) was a major influence on him, and encouraged him to tell his story in meetings. Douglass became a leader of the abolitionist movement. His autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave , was published in 1845 to huge...

Lloyd, Edward, V

Lloyd, Edward, V (b. 22 July 1779)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
613 words

...Edward Lloyd IV of Maryland and his wife, Elizabeth Tayloe, of Virginia. At age eighteen, he married Sally Scott Murray of Annapolis. They had seven children, including their youngest son Daniel, whom Douglass accompanied as a child. Lloyd died at age fifty-five at the family's townhouse in Annapolis. See also Lloyd Family . Bibliography Brugger, Robert J. Maryland: A Middle Temperament, 1634–1980 . Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1988: 206–215. Describes Edward Lloyd V in the context of early-nineteenth-century Maryland's agricultural and...

Lloyd Family

Lloyd Family   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
935 words

...in Madison County, Mississippi, and transported some of the slaves there from Wye Plantation. See also American Revolution ; Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery in ; Caribbean ; Childhood ; Constitution, U.S. ; Free African Americans before the Civil War (South) ; Life and Times of Frederick Douglass ; Lloyd, Edward, V ; Music ; My Bondage and My Freedom ; Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass ; Proslavery Thought ; Slave Trade ; Slavery ; and Work . Bibliography Brugger, Robert J. Maryland: A Middle Temperament, 1634–1980 . Baltimore: Johns...

Sears, Amanda Auld

Sears, Amanda Auld (b. 1826)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
621 words

...following with enthusiasm that slave as a free man, and listening with joy to the plaudits he received as he marched along through the crowded streets of the great city. On Amanda Sears's death in 1878 her husband wrote to Douglass, “God bless you … for your kindness to her.” See also Antislavery Movement ; Auld Family ; Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery in ; Douglass, Frederick ; Republican Party ; Voting Rights ; and Women . Bibliography Blassingame, John W. , John R. McKivigan , and Peter P. Hinks , eds. The Frederick Douglass Papers . Series 2,...

McCulloch v. Maryland

McCulloch v. Maryland   Reference library

Francis N. Stites

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
464 words

... Maryland then sued McCulloch , who, after losing twice in state court, appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court. The case attracted intense public interest. Many held the BUS, the “Monster,” responsible for the Panic of 1819 . Further, agricultural depression and debates over slavery in Missouri were reviving interest in old states’ rights arguments. Beginning on 22 February 1819 , some of the nation’s best lawyers argued the case for nine days. On 17 March, Marshall spoke for a unanimous Court in upholding Congress’s power to incorporate the bank and in...

McCulloch v. Maryland

McCulloch v. Maryland   Reference library

Francis N. Stites

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
456 words

...Maryland then sued McCulloch, who, after losing twice in state court, appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court . The case attracted intense public interest. Many held the BUS, the “Monster,” responsible for the Panic of 1819 . Further, agricultural depression and debates over slavery in Missouri were reviving interest in old states'-rights arguments. Beginning on 22 February 1819 , some of the nations' best lawyers argued the case for nine days. On 17 March , Marshall spoke for a unanimous Court in upholding Congress's power to incorporate the bank and in...

Baltimore

Baltimore   Reference library

Elliott W. Galkin, N. Quist, and Ryan Ebright

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
2,454 words
Illustration(s):
1

... . Largest city in Maryland (pop. 620,961; metropolitan area: 2,799,226; 2010 US Census). First settled in 1662 , Baltimore became a town in 1730 . A prominent port of entry for immigrants, Baltimore's sizable harbor facilitated the growth of the city's population and economy, the latter of which was fueled by its shipping and manufacturing industries. By 1800 its population was larger than that of the state's capital, Annapolis. As early as 1784 concerts in the city were advertised in the press. These early programs were of great diversity,...

Wilson, Fred

Wilson, Fred (1954)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of American Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
511 words
Illustration(s):
1

...in slavery. In Cabinetmaking, 1820–1960 , for example, he juxtaposed ornate 19th-century chairs with a whipping post to which slaves would be tied during beatings. In 2001 he received his first retrospective, Fred Wilson, Objects and Installations 1979–2000, which was organized by the Center for Art and Visual Culture, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and traveled to multiple venues. In 2003 , Wilson represented the USA at the 2003 Venice Biennale with a mixed-media installation entitled Speak of Me as I Am . Borrowing the line from...

Free African Americans Before the Civil War (South)

Free African Americans Before the Civil War (South)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,013 words

...the Civil War. See also American Revolution ; Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery in ; Caulker's Trade ; Civil Rights ; Class ; Colonization ; Confederate Policy toward African Americans and Slaves ; Demographics ; Discrimination ; Douglass, Anna Murray ; Douglass, Frederick ; Economic Life ; Education ; Free African Americans before the Civil War (North) ; Integration ; Segregation ; Urbanization ; Voting Rights ; and Work . Bibliography Berlin, Ira . Slaves without Masters: The Free Negro in the Antebellum South . New York: Pantheon, 1974....

Johnson, Joshua

Johnson, Joshua (1763–after 1824)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of American Art and Artists (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
264 words

...In any event, he must have been familiar with examples of their work commissioned by families in the Baltimore area. Evidence about many aspects of Johnson’s life remains open to question. Records suggest that he was a mulatto; obscuring his partially African heritage, light skin may have been responsible for confusion about his racial ancestry. Born in Baltimore, after he was liberated from slavery in 1782 he lived there as a free black. City directories list him as a painter between 1796 and 1824 . Subsequently he is recorded as residing in Maryland,...

Chaplin, William Lawrence

Chaplin, William Lawrence (b. c. 1798)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
601 words

...of the New York Anti-Slavery Society. Respected for his administrative activities, Chaplin became known among New York abolitionists as “General Chaplin.” In New York, Chaplin joined a group of radical political abolitionists, headed by the wealthy philanthropist Gerrit Smith; this group formed the Liberty Party in 1840 . Like other members of this group, Chaplin contended that slavery was always illegal and that abolitionists must help slaves escape. Chaplin admired the slave rescuer Charles T. Torrey, who was arrested in Baltimore in 1844 and died two...

Catholic Church and African Americans

Catholic Church and African Americans   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
2,174 words

...population in Maryland. However, the decline of indentured servants in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries prompted the Jesuits increasingly to use black slaves. The Ursulines and the Jesuits were not the only slaveholders in the early American Catholic Church. The several orders of priests that owned slaves included the Vincentians in Missouri, the Sulpicians in Baltimore, and the Capuchins in Louisiana. The orders of nuns that owned slaves included the Carmelites in Maryland and the Sisters of Charity and the Sisters of Loretto in Kentucky....

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