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Bal Tashḥit

Subject: Religion

(; do not destroy), biblical prohibition against destroying fruit trees, even when laying siege to a city (Dt. 20.19–20), extended by the Talmud to cover all senseless destruction or waste ...

BAL TASHḤIT

BAL TASHḤIT   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
66 words

... TASHḤIT ( ; do not destroy), biblical prohibition against destroying fruit trees, even when laying siege to a city ( Dt . 20.19–20), extended by the Talmud to cover all senseless destruction or waste ( Shab . 129a; B . Q . 91b). The rabbis permitted destruction if there was an ultimately constructive objective (e.g., cutting trees for building or in order to let other trees grow). See also Ecology...

Bal Tashḥit

Bal Tashḥit  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(; do not destroy), biblical prohibition against destroying fruit trees, even when laying siege to a city (Dt. 20.19–20), extended by the Talmud to cover all senseless destruction or waste ...
ECOKOSHER

ECOKOSHER   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
304 words

...non-legal guidelines for determining the ethical status of food products. The Commission’s Magen Tzedek seal of approval is intended to complement but not supplant traditional kosher certification. Proponents of eco-kashrut commonly cite mitsvot ( see Mitsvah ) such as bal tashḥit (do not destroy [recklessly]), tsaʿar baʿaleiḥayyim (do not cause suffering to living things), and shemirat ha-guf (protection of the body) as evidence of a deeply rooted concern for the natural environment within Jewish tradition. The Jew and the Carrot (...

ECOLOGY

ECOLOGY   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,048 words

...of an ass and an ox ( Dt . 22.10), or the seething of a kid in its mother’s milk ( Ex . 23.19; 34.26; Dt . 14.21). In the Mishna and the Talmud the rabbis elaborated biblical laws into a program for the sanctification of nature. They forbade any form of wanton destruction ( bal tashḥit ), prohibited causing unnecessary suffering of animals ( tsaʿar baʿalei ḥayyim ; See Animals, Treatment of ), and protected the soil of erets yisraʾel by prohibiting grazing by sheep. In their tales and parables, the rabbis often exemplified moral values by referring to...

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