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Bacchylides

(c.520–450 bc), Greek lyric poet, nephew of Simonides. Although he was well known in Hellenistic and Roman times, only a handful of lines had survived in quotations when a ...

Bacchylides

Bacchylides (c.510–431bce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
764 words

...Bacchylides from Pindar is his style, characterized by the rhetorician Longinus as “smooth” rather than Pindar's “sublime.” Longinus also implies that no sane person would prefer Bacchylides to Pindar. Moderns were unable to evaluate the validity of Longinus’ judgment until 1897 , with the publication of a second century ce papyrus containing substantial remains of fourteen epinicia and six other poems, usually identified as dithyrambs. Prior to that discovery, Bacchylides was known only from about forty short and scattered fragments. Bacchylides’...

Bacchylides

Bacchylides (c.520–450 bc)   Reference library

Herwig Maehler

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
842 words

...Literature A. Koerte , Hermes 1918, 113–47, and RE Suppl. 4. 58–67; E. D. Townsend , Bacchylides and Lyric Style (1956); B. Gentili , Bacchilide (1958); A. P. Burnett , The Art of Bacchylides (1985); W. M. Calder and J. Stern (eds.), Pindaros und Bakchylides (1970); H. Maehler , MH 1991, 114–26 (on 17); W. S. Barrett , Hermes 1954, 421 ff. (on fr. 4+22); B. Snell , Hermes 1952, 157–63 ( = Ges. Schr. 105–11) (on fr. 20a); D. Fearn, Bacchylides (2007). Herwig...

Bacchylidēs

Bacchylidēs   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
127 words

... ( c. 520–450 bc ), Greek lyric poet , nephew of Simonides . Although he was well known in Hellenistic and Roman times, only a handful of lines had survived in quotations when a papyrus containing his book of victory odes almost complete and the first half of his book of dithyrambs was found in Egypt in 1896 . His patrons, apart from Hieron 1 I of Syracuse , included athletes from Ceos, Aegina , Phlius, Metapontum, and Thessaly . Several of his dithyrambs were composed for competitions at Athens, one for Sparta. Stylistically, his dithyrambs...

Bacchylides

Bacchylides   Quick reference

Herwig Maehler

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
685 words

... ( c. 520–450 bc ), lyric poet, of Iulis in Ceos, son of Midon (or Midylus, Etym. Magn. 582, 20), nephew of Simonides (Strabo 486, Suda , entry under Bακχυλίδης ). His floruit was given as 480 by Chron. Pasch. 162b (304. 6), as 467 and 451 by Eusebius – Jerome (the entry in Eusebius, Chron. Ol. 87.2 = 431 bc , refers to a flute-player Bacchylides mentioned by the comic poet Plato in his Sophistai , fr. 149 KA, PCG 7. 494, see G. Fatouros, Philol. 1961 , 147). The assumption that he was younger than Pindar (Eust. Prooem....

Bacchylides

Bacchylides (c.520–450)   Reference library

Herwig Maehler

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
701 words

... ( c. 520–450 bc ), lyric poet , of Iulis in Ceos , son of Midon (or Midylus , Etym. Magn . 582 , 20), nephew of Simonides (Strabo 486 , Suda , entry under ‘ Bakchulidēs’ ). His floruit was given as 480 by Chron. Pasch. 162b (304. 6), as 467 and 451 by Eusebius –Jerome (the entry in Eusebius, Chron. Olympian Odes 87.2 = 431 bc , refers to a flute-player Bacchylides mentioned by the comic poet Plato in his Sophistai , fr. 149 R. Kassel and C. Austin , PCG 7. 494, see G. Fatouros , Philol . 1961 , 147). The assumption...

Bacchy'lides

Bacchy'lides (c.520–450 bc))   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
386 words

...found on papyri ( see papyrology ), and some scholia . Bacchylides seems to have been employed by the same patrons as employed his uncle Simonides and Pindar . He and Pindar both composed odes for at least two victories won in the great games by Hieron tyrant of Syracuse: thus Bacchylides' Ode 5 and Pindar's Olympian 1 both commemorate the horse-race at the Olympian games of 476 bc , and his Ode 4 and Pindar's Pythian 1 the chariot-race at Delphi in 470 . The epinician odes of Bacchylides contain the same elements as Pindar's—central mythical...

Bacchylides

Bacchylides  

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(c.520–450 bc),Greek lyric poet, nephew of Simonides. Although he was well known in Hellenistic and Roman times, only a handful of lines had survived in quotations when a papyrus containing his book ...
epinician poetry

epinician poetry  

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Victory odes for athletes and equestrian victors; see agones; bacchylides; pindar; simonides.
Cesare Arici

Cesare Arici  

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(1782–1836).Poet from Brescia, who imitated Vincenzo Monti in his celebratory political poetry and Callimachus in his neoclassical hymns, which he attributed to Bacchylides. He also wrote a series of ...
flight of the mind

flight of the mind  

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In Pindar (fr. 292 B. Snell and H. Maehler) and Bacchylides (5. 16ff) flight is a metaphor for elevation of poetic style. The philosopher Parmenides (H. Diels and W. Kranz ...
epinicion

epinicion  

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A kind of Greek ode composed in honour of a victor in the Olympic Games or equivalent festivals at Delphi and Corinth. Such odes were sung in chorus in a triadic structure of strophe, antistrophe, ...
Ceos

Ceos  

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An island (131 sq. km.: 50 sq. mi.) in the NW Cyclades. A final neolithic settlement existed at Kephala. Agia Irini, a fortified town in the north-west, was occupied throughout ...
Didymus

Didymus  

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(1st cent. bc) belonged to the school founded at Alexandria by Aristarchus (2) and himself taught there. A scholar of immense learning and industry (cf. his nicknames Chalkenteros (‘Brazen-bowels’) ...
Hieron I

Hieron I  

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(RE 11),regent at Gela for his brother Gelon (485–478 bc), and tyrant (see tyranny) of Syracuse (478–466); fought at Himera (480), and married the daughter of Anaxilas (1). Having ...
omphalos

omphalos  

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[Ar]A sacred conical or spherical stone symbolically representing the navel of the earth. Found in Mycenaean contexts in Greece, as at Delphi.
Nereus

Nereus  

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In Greek mythology, an old sea god. Like Proteus he had the power of assuming various forms. His daughters were the Nereids, sea-nymphs who included Thetis, mother of Achilles.
Greek papyrology

Greek papyrology  

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Papyrus, manufactured in Egypt from a marsh plant, Cyperus papyrus (see books, greek and roman), was the most widely used writing material in the Graeco‐Roman world. The object of papyrology is to ...
Laocoön

Laocoön  

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A Trojan prince, brother of Anchises and priest of Apollo or Poseidon. In the standard version of his story, he protested against drawing the Wooden Horse within the walls of Troy, and two great ...
athletics

athletics  

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GreekAt the core of Greek athletics was an individual's struggle to gain victory over an opponent; hence it included not only (as ‘athletics’ implies nowadays) track and field events but also boxing, ...
patronage, literary

patronage, literary  

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GreekLiterary patronage in Greece is associated chiefly with autocratic rulers (though in Classical Athens the choregia was a kind of democratization of the patronage principle). The tyrants of ...

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