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Babylonia

Subject: History

[CP] A region taking in the whole of the southern alluvial plain of Mesopotamia, which although traditionally linked with the city of Babylon was not always connected to it or ...

Babylonia

Babylonia   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
228 words

...II ( 604–562 ), who rebuilt Babylonia's cities extensively and sacked Jerusalem ( 587 ). The last Neo‐Babylonian ruler, Nabonidus ( 555–539 ), was defeated by Cyrus 1 the Great of Persia. Alexander 2 the Great conquered Babylonia in 331 , detaching its northern region (Mesopotamia). Seleucus I and Antigonus I disputed, and fought for, control of Babylonia ( 316–309 ) and it became a core‐region of the Seleucid empire. Babylonia was perceived by Greeks and Romans as the source of astronomical and astrological lore. They associated this...

Babylonia

Babylonia   Reference library

Amélie Kuhrt

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
533 words

...), who turned Babylonia’s imperial territory into a single satrapy of the Achaemenid empire ( see persia ). It was divided early in Xerxes I ’s reign ( 486–465 ) into two provinces: the satrapy of Babylonia stretched from the Persian Gulf to Assyria and north-west to the east bank of the Euphrates. Alexander the Great conquered Babylonia in 331 , detaching its northern region (Mesopotamia); he planned to turn Babylonia into one of his chief bases. Seleucus I and Antigonus the One-eyed disputed, and fought for, control of Babylonia ( 316–309 ) and...

Babylonia

Babylonia ([CP])   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
34 words

... [CP] A region taking in the whole of the southern alluvial plain of Mesopotamia, which although traditionally linked with the city of Babylon was not always connected to it or ruled from...

Babylonia

Babylonia   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
99 words

... The ancient name for southern Mesopotamia (earlier called Sumer), which first became a political entity when an Amorite dynasty united Sumer and Akkad in the first half of the 2nd millennium bc . At this period its power extended over Assyria and part of Syria. After c . 1530 bc first the Hittites then other invaders, the Kassites, dominated the land, and it became part of the Assyrian empire. With the latter’s decline Babylonia again became prominent under the Chaldeans (625–538 bc ), only to fall to Cyrus the Great, whose entry into Babylon ...

Babylonia

Babylonia   Reference library

Amélie Kuhrt

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
862 words

...), who turned Babylonia's imperial territory into a single satrapy of the Achaemenid empire ( see persia ). It was divided early in Xerxes I 's reign ( 486–465 ) into two provinces: the satrapy of Babylonia stretched from the Persian Gulf to Assyria and north-west to the east bank of the Euphrates. Alexander (3) the Great conquered Babylonia in 331 , detaching its northern region ( Mesopotamia ); he planned to turn Babylonia into one of his chief bases. Seleucus (1) I and Antigonus (1) I disputed, and fought for, control of Babylonia ( 316–309 ) and...

Babylonia

Babylonia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
271 words

... Region in southern Iraq stretching from Baghdad to the Arab–Persian Gulf. (Classical writers did not include Babylonia in Mesopotamia.) Through irrigation from the Tigris and Euphrates rivers its fertility was legendary. The first settlement was in the sixth millennium bc. From the sixteenth century bc Babylonia was a state with Babylon as its capital. From the late eighth century bc it was subject to Assyria until, with the help of the Medes , it destroyed the Assyrian empire, taking the capital Nineveh in 612 bc. The most famous Babylonian...

Babylonia

Babylonia   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
105 words

... Ancient region and empire of Mesopotamia , based on the city of Babylon . The Babylonian Empire was first established in the early 18th century bc by Hammurabi the Great, but declined under the impact of Hittites and Kassites in c .1595 bc . After a long period of weakness and confusion, the Empire eventually fell to Assyria in the 8th century bc . In c .625 bc Babylon regained its independence and former glory, when Nabopolassar captured the Assyrian capital of Nineveh . In 586 bc the New Babylonian (Chaldaean) Empire defeated Egypt...

BABYLONIA

BABYLONIA   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
918 words

... . The originally insignificant city-state of Babylon, located on the Euphrates, was elevated by Hammurabi (r. 1792–1750) and his dynasty (the first dynasty of Babylon) to the capital city and cultural metropolis of southern Mesopotamia. Eventually, all of southern Mesopotamia came to be known as Babylonia, while northern Mesopotamia was called Assyria . The other major period of Babylonian supremacy was the Neo-Babylonian (or Chaldean) empire first established by Nabopolassar (r. 625–605), which endured until the conquest of Babylon by Cyrus II of...

Babylonia

Babylonia   Quick reference

Dynasties of the World (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
History
Length:
918 words

...for Babylonia) were also in use. See Brinkman , Political History , 123–4. Bibliography Brinkman, J. A. , Materials and Studies for Kassite History (Chicago, 1976). Brinkman, J. A. , ‘Mesopotamian Chronology of the Historical Period’, A. L. Oppenheim , Ancient Mesopotamia (rev. edn., Chicago, 1977), 335–48. Brinkman, J. A. , A Political History of Post-Kassite Babylonia, 1158–722 bc (Rome, 1968). Cambridge Ancient History , ed. I. E. S. Edwards (3rd edn., 2 vols. in 4 pts., Cambridge, 1970–5). Frame, G. , Rulers of Babylonia: from...

Diogenes of Babylonia

Diogenes of Babylonia   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
85 words

...of Babylonia ( c. 240–c. 152 bce ). Pupil of Chrysippus in Athens who like him became the head of the Stoa. His visit to Rome in 156–155 bce contributed to the diffusion of Stoic theories outside Greece. His book On language (Peri phōnēs) apparently reflects Chrysippus' thought; it is lost but is summarized (through yet another intermediary) by Diogenes Laertius in his Lives of philosophers (VII.55ff.). See also Chrysippus ; History of Linguistics , article on Ancient World: Ancient Greece and Rome ; and Stoics . Anna Morpurgo...

Babylonia

Babylonia   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
110 words

... • Campania , Catania, pannier • apnoea • Oceania , Tanya, Titania • biennia , denier, quadrennia, quinquennia, septennia, triennia • Albania , balletomania, bibliomania, crania, dipsomania, egomania, erotomania, kleptomania, Lithuania, Lusitania, mania, Mauritania, megalomania, miscellanea, monomania, nymphomania, Pennsylvania, Pomerania, pyromania, Rainier, Romania, Ruritania, Tasmania, Transylvania, Urania • Armenia , bergenia, gardenia, neurasthenia, ostopenia, proscenia, sarcopenia, schizophrenia, senior, Slovenia • Abyssinia ,...

Assyria and Babylonia, Poetry of

Assyria and Babylonia, Poetry of   Reference library

E. Reiner and W. Farber

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
1,838 words

...and Babylonia, Poetry of I. Introduction II. Narrative Poetry III. Religious Poetry IV. Didactic Poetry I. Introduction. Assyrian and Babylonian were the two main dialects of Akkadian, a Semitic lang. Of these, Babylonian and not Assyrian was used for most of the poetry. The earliest surviving poetic texts, preserved on clay tablets written in cuneiform script, date from the end of the third millennium bce . A very creative period followed in the Old Babylonian period, from ca. 1800 bce onward. Around and after 1200 , again much new poetry...

Babylonia

Babylonia   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
60 words
Babylonia

Babylonia   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
60 words
Babylonia

Babylonia   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
92 words
Babylonia

Babylonia   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
96 words
Babylonia

Babylonia   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
43 words
Babylonia

Babylonia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
[CP]A region taking in the whole of the southern alluvial plain of Mesopotamia, which although traditionally linked with the city of Babylon was not always connected to it or ruled from it.
Diogenes of Babylonia

Diogenes of Babylonia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
(c. 240–c. 152bce). Pupil of Chrysippus in Athens who like him became the head of the Stoa. His visit to Rome in 156–155bce contributed to the diffusion of Stoic theories ...
Assyrian Empire

Assyrian Empire   Reference library

Oxford Bible Atlas (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,213 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
4

...10 as ‘the great and noble Osnappar’. It was under Ashurbanipal that Assyria reached the peak of her cultural development, as witnessed by the royal residences and great library excavated at Nineveh. But the Assyrian grip on Egypt and Babylonia was diminishing, and after the death of Ashurbanipal the decline was rapid. Babylonia, under Nabopolassar, gained independence in c. 626 after an unsuccessful Assyrian attack on Babylon. To the east, the power of the Medes was increasing, and Asshur fell to them in 614. Nineveh was destroyed by the Medes and Babylonians...

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