You are looking at 1-20 of 190 entries  for:

  • All: Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St x
clear all

View:

Overview

Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St

A monastic Rule which exists in three main forms, two for men and one for women; their relationship is disputed. As there is no reference to a rule in St Augustine's Retractationes, his ...

Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St.

Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St.   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
82 words

... of Hippo, Rule of St. A monastic Rule which exists in three main forms, two for men and one for women; their relationship is disputed. As there is no reference to a rule in St Augustine ’s Retractationes , his authorship has been doubted. The Rule was little known until it was adopted by the Augustinian Canons at the end of the 11th cent. It was later accepted by the Dominicans , the Augustinian Hermits , and various other...

Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St

Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
370 words

...Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St . A title applied to various monastic texts whose precise relationship has long been a matter of dispute. Despite various permutations in different MSS, there appear to be three main texts: (1) the Ordo Monasterii (Regulations for a Monastery, or System), (2) the Praeceptum (Precept), and (3) St Augustine 's Epistula 211, paragraphs 5–16, which is closely parallel to the Praeceptum , but addressed to women, whereas the Praeceptum is addressed to men. While Augustine's interest in monasticism is clear both from the...

Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St

Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St  

A monastic Rule which exists in three main forms, two for men and one for women; their relationship is disputed. As there is no reference to a rule in St Augustine's Retractationes, his authorship ...
5 The European Medieval Book

5 The European Medieval Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
9,862 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...ever-expanding Christian Church prepared and defended itself against the assaults on the Roman empire from beyond its fragile borders. Many primitive MSS were prepared, probably mostly by monks, of patristic authors such as Ambrose of Milan ( c .339–97 ), Jerome ( c .345–420 ), Augustine of Hippo ( 354–430 ), Gregory the Great ( c .540–604 ), and Isidore of Seville ( c .560–636 ). Early Christian books from southern Europe in what are sometimes called the Dark Ages are usually squarish in shape, on *parchment ( *papyrus gradually died out, except...

Augustine

Augustine  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Male forename, name of two saints.St Augustine of Canterbury (d. c.604), Italian churchman. Sent from Rome by Pope Gregory the Great to refound the Church in England in 597, he was favourably ...
Confessions of St Augustine

Confessions of St Augustine  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The anti-Manichaean prose-poem written by St Augustine c.398–400. The title means both ‘confessing’ in the biblical sense of praising God, and also avowal of faults. Books 1–9 are autobiographical; ...
Prémontré

Prémontré  

(abbey) St Norbert and his followers founded Prémontré in the Vosges west of Laon (1120). First house of the Premonstratensian order, it followed the Rule of Augustine.JSOI. Cursius ...
St Augustine

St Augustine  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[Na]Church Father, born c.ad 354, who, after a varied life as a teacher and philosopher, was ordained bishop of Hippo, Africa, in ad 395. His letters, polemics, and theological and philosophical ...
Rules, Monastic

Rules, Monastic  

Monastic Rules were spiritual and normative texts describing the life of monks and fixing community practices in writing. A corpus of some 30 Rules, the earliest dating from the late ...
St Ethelbert

St Ethelbert  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. 616), King of Kent from c.560. He married Bertha, daughter of Charibert, the Frankish king; probably under her influence, he welcomed St Augustine and the Roman mission in 597, was himself ...
Eugippius

Eugippius  

(c.455–c.535), Abbot of Lucullanum, near Naples. He wrote a Life of St Severinus (c.511) and a monastic Rule. He also made a collection of extracts from the works of St Augustine and was probably ...
St-Victor, and Victorines

St-Victor, and Victorines  

(abbey)Community of canons regular following the Rule of Augustine. When William of Champeaux resigned as archdeacon of Notre-Dame, Paris, in 1108, he ventured into the countryside to establish a ...
Brothers Hospitallers

Brothers Hospitallers  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The Order, whose members are mostly laymen, developed out of the work for the sick of St John of God (d. 1550). In 1572 Pius V approved the Order, which adopted the Augustinian Rule.
St Monica

St Monica  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(332–c. 387),mother of St Augustine of Hippo. She is often regarded as the model of Christian mothers for her patience with her son's spiritual crises, which ended with his conversion in 386. Her ...
Friars of the Sack

Friars of the Sack  

The Order of Penitence of Jesus Christ, also called Friars of the Sack by reason of their coarse clothing, was founded in 1248 by a knight of Hyères connected with ...
Zosimus

Zosimus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. 418), Bp. of Rome from 417. His pontificate was marked by blunders. Having reopened the case of Pelagius and his supporters, he was forced by an Imperial edict to come into line with the views of ...
Augustinian canons

Augustinian canons  

(‘Regular’ or ‘Black’ canons) had their origin in the mid‐11th‐cent. ecclesiastical reform movement. Earlier communities of clerics (or ‘canons’) staffing cathedrals and large churches and organized ...
Hermann-Judah of Cologne

Hermann-Judah of Cologne  

(c.1107–c.1181)Central figure in account of a Jewish merchant’s conversion to Christianity at Cologne (1128–29) and his entrance into the Augustinian order. Scholars dispute whether the account is ...
John Bonus

John Bonus  

(1168–1249)Born at Mantua in 1168, orphaned of his father at the age of 15, Giovanni Bono took up the nomadic life of the jongleurs; converted in 1208, he decided ...
Alexian Brothers and Nuns

Alexian Brothers and Nuns  

A religious community specifically devoted to caring for the sick, with special attention to the dying. The order traces its origins to the Beghard communities of the Low Countries, particularly ...

View: