View:

Overview

Arles

(city, kingdom) Situated at the mouth of the Rhône delta in southern France, Arles was an important administrative centre in the late Roman Empire. After a period of decline under ...

Arles

Arles   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
124 words
Illustration(s):
1

... (city, kingdom) Situated at the mouth of the Rhône delta in southern *France , Arles was an important administrative centre in the late Roman Empire. After a period of decline under the Franks, it became the capital of an independent kingdom after the break-up of the *Carolingian empire. It was integrated into the (Holy) *Roman Empire in 1033 , and the remnants of the kingdom were ceded to France in 1378 . From the 14th century onwards, Arles ’s importance in the region was eclipsed by nearby *Avignon . Aerial view of the amphitheatre and...

Arles

Arles   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
676 words

...of a Gothic chevet at Saint-Trophime in connection with the cult of the blessed Louis Aleman, archbishop of Arles from 1423 to 1450 ). Arles possessed one of the most important Jewish communities in Provence , destroyed in 1484 . It was also the home of the author of the only vernacular Provençal chronicle , Bertrand Boysset ( 1365–1415 ). L. Royer , “ Arles ”, DHGE , 4, 1930, 231-243. J. Hubert , “ La topographie religieuse d'Arles au VIe siècle ”, CAr , 1947, 17-27. P.-A. Février , Le Développement urbain en Provence de l'époque romaine à la...

Arles

Arles   Reference library

Marc Heijmans, Simon Loseby, and Rebecca Darley

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...In 353, a council was organized by the Emperor Constantius II in Arles to impose Homoean ‘Arian’ theology. Arles came by now to be regarded as the second city of Gaul after Trier ( Expositio Totius Mundi , 58), and was celebrated by Ausonius ( Ordo , 73–80) as ‘the little Rome of Gaul’. In around 400, the Gallic praetorian prefecture was transferred from Trier to Arles; this probably occasioned the erection of an aula palatina , which is still well preserved. From 408 to 411, Arles was the residence of the usurper Constantine III . The annual...

Arles

Arles (Provence–Alpes–Côte d’Azur/France)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...Arles , Provence–Alpes–Côte d’Azur/France ( Theline, Arelate ) Located where the River Rhône delta starts, the city originally had the Greek name Theline. The present name is probably derived from the Indo-European root word ar ‘water’ or ‘river’, to mean ‘Town in the Marshes’. Having been an important Roman city, it was captured by the Visigoths in the 6th century and by the Muslims in 730 . During the 10th century it became capital of the Kingdom of Burgundy, later renamed Arles. Annexed by the Holy Roman Empire in the 11th century , it was ceded...

Arles

Arles   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
339 words

...Arles (Lat. Arelate ), Synods of. At least 15 Councils were held at Arles between 314 and 1275 . Among the more important were: (1) 314. Summoned by Constantine to deal with the Donatist schism. It passed 22 canons dealing with abuses resulting from the persecutions. (2) 353. An Arianizing Council.[(2a). The 25 canons of the so-called ‘Second Council of Arles’ of the 5th cent. appear to be a private collection of canons based on those of earlier councils held elsewhere and not to have ever received conciliar authority.] (3) 813. Canons...

Arles

Arles   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
2,110 words
Illustration(s):
2

...: Architecture dominicaine en Provence (Paris, 1979) L. Stouff : Arles à la fin du moyen-âge , 2 vols (Aix-en-Provence, 1986) W. Klingshirn : Caesarius of Arles: The Making of a Christian Community in Late Antique Gaul (Cambridge and New York, 1994) L. Stouff : L’Eglise et la vie religieuse à Arles et en Provence au Moyen aĝe (Aix-en-Provence, 2001) 1. St Trophîme. The outer walls of the present cathedral of St Trophîme are normally assigned to the Carolingian Arles.  Portal figures of SS John and Peter , from the left colonnade of the...

Arles Festival

Arles Festival   Reference library

Madeleine Hill Vedel

The Oxford Companion to the Photograph

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
135 words

... Festival (Rencontres Internationales de la Photographie), an annual event conceived by the photographer Lucien Clergue , the museum curator Jean‐Maurice Rouquette (both of Arles), and the writer and television producer Michel Tournier . In its inaugural year, 1970 , it embraced the international photographic world with an Edward Weston exhibition at the Musée Réattu. By 1971 it was attracting figures such as Jacques‐Henri Lartigue , Jeanloup Sieff , Bruce Davidson , Jerry Uelsmann and Hiro . In 2003 over 30 official exhibitions were...

Caesarius of Arles

Caesarius of Arles (470–542)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
173 words

... Nuns . For them he wrote the first monastic rule intended for women , which he later summarized for the use of monks. Caesarius of Arles: Sermons , 3 vols., New York, 1956-73. Césaire d'Arles , Oevres monastiques , A. de Vogüé (ed.), J. Courreau (ed.), SC , 345, 1988; ibid. , 398, 1994. W. M. Daly , “ Caesarius of Arles, a Precursor of Medieval Christendom ”, Tr. , 26, 1970, 1-28. W. E. Klingshirn , Caesarius of Arles , Cambridge, 1993. Adalbert de...

Honoratus of Arles

Honoratus of Arles (429/30)   Reference library

David Lambert

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...of Arles (d. 429/30 ) Bishop of Arles from 427/8, and founder of the monastery at Lérins . Born into a noble Christian family in Gaul , Honoratus experienced a conversion to asceticism as a young man. He founded, probably c. 410 , a monastic community on the island of Lérins, which soon became one of the most influential in Late Antique Gaul; Eucherius of Lyons , Hilary of Arles , Lupus of Troyes , Vincent of Lérins , Faustus of Riez , and Salvian all spent time there under his leadership. In 427/8, Honoratus left Lérins to...

Arles, Synods of

Arles, Synods of   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
44 words

..., Synods of . Among the more important were those of: 314, summoned by Constantine to deal with the Donatist schism; 353, an Arianizing Council; 1234 , against the Albigensian heresy; and 1263 , which condemned the doctrines of Joachim of Fiore...

Arles, Council of

Arles, Council of   Reference library

David Gwynn

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

..., Council of ( August 314 ) Church council summoned to Arles by Constantine I after the Donatists appealed against their condemnation at the Lateran Council of 313 . The 33 Western bishops present (including three from Britain ) again denounced the Donatists and passed 22 disciplinary canons (conciliar letter in Optatus , Against the Donatists , Appendix 4). Arles was the first large council summoned by an emperor , and the bishops were permitted to use the Cursus Publicus (Constantine to Chrestus of Syracuse, Eusebius , HE X, 5,...

Aurelian of Arles

Aurelian of Arles (522/3–51)   Reference library

William E. Klingshirn and Simon Loseby

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...of Arles ( 522/3–51 ) Bishop of Arles (545/6–51), son of Sacerdos, Bishop of Lyons , appointed bishop by Childebert I . Aurelian received two letters from Pope Vigilius in August 546, who granted him the pallium ( Ep . Arel. 43–4). The concerns he expressed in 549 about the Three Chapters controversy and papal views upon it are known only from Vigilius’ reply ( Ep. Arel. 45). He composed rules for male and female monasteries which he founded with royal patronage in Arles, but his identification as the Bishop Aurelian who wrote an...

Hilary of Arles

Hilary of Arles (401–49)   Reference library

Marc Heijmans

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...of Arles ( 401–49 ) Bishop of Arles from 430. Born in north-east Gaul of a senatorial family, he spent several years in the monastery of Lérins , founded by his kinsman Honoratus , where he supervised the education of the sons of Eucherius . When S. Honoratus became Bishop of Arles (427), S. Hilary, now a priest , remained in Lérins, and Eucherius, now Bishop of Lyons , dedicated his De Laude Heremi to him (Hilary, Epistula ad Eucherium ). After the death of Honoratus (430), Hilary succeeded him as Bishop of Arles. Probably in 431, he...

Rusticula of Arles

Rusticula of Arles (550/1–627)   Reference library

Marc Heijmans

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...of Arles ( 550/1–627 ) Abbess (568/9–627) in succession to Liliola of the Monastery of S. John founded by Caesarius in Arles . She is known from her Vita , written by the priest Florentius of S. Paul-Trois-Chateaux, which, amid other colourful stories, reports that she was of a noble family from Vaison-la-Romaine, and built several churches within the monastic precinct. Marc Heijmans PCBE IV/2, Rusticula. Life ( BHL 7405), ed. B. Krusch in MGH SS rer. Meroving. IV (1902), 339–51. ET McNamara et al., Sainted Women , 122–36. P. Riché ,...

Caesarius of Arles

Caesarius of Arles   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
468 words

...say. He founded a nunnery at Arles, for which he wrote a Rule and which was governed by his sister. His two monastic Rules became famous after his death. Like Benedict he emphasized stability; for the nuns he insisted on enclosure. He is rightly reckoned an important predecessor of the Benedictine Rule. As archbishop of Arles he presided over the council of Orange in 529 , which condemned both those who asserted that God predestines any man to damnation and those who denied that God inspires the first acts of faith and love. Arles was under the rule of ...

Trophimus of Arles

Trophimus of Arles   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
181 words

...of Arles (3rd century), bishop . According to Gregory of Tours , Trophimus was one of several bishops associated with Sernin of Toulouse, who were founders of famous sees of France. Already in 417 Pope Zosimus , writing to the bishops of Gaul, mentioned Trophimus, sent formerly by the papacy to preach and found the church of Arles, from which other churches had been founded. This is virtually all we know about Trophimus. His church, which later enjoyed metropolitan status, is very ancient: a crypt of the 3rd century was discovered in 1835 ;...

Caesarius of Arles

Caesarius of Arles (469)   Reference library

William E. Klingshirn

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...councils of Arles (524), Carpentras (527), and Vaison (529) he advocated an ascetic way of life for bishops and clergy, and promoted throughout his province the pastoral standards of preaching and worship he had established in Arles. At the Council of Orange (529), he attempted to resolve a continuing theological problem (and deflect criticism from rival bishops) by harmonizing Augustinian and Gallic definitions of grace and free will. In 534 he issued the final revision of his Rule for Nuns , first composed for the women’s monastery in Arles and later...

Hilary of Arles

Hilary of Arles (401/2–449)   Reference library

David Lambert

The Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,488 words

... Hilary of Arles , Sermo de vita Sancti Honorati , ed., trans., and notes M.-D. Valentin , Hilaire d’Arles. Vie de Saint Honorat , SC 235 (Paris 1977). Vitae Sanctorum Honorati et Hilarii episcoporum Arelatensium , ed. S. Cavallin (Lund 1952). Honorat de Marseille. La vie d’Hilaire d’Arles , Cavallin's text; trans. and notes P.-A. Jacob , SC 404 (Paris 1995). ...

Genesius of Arles

Genesius of Arles   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
385 words

...of Arles ( Gennys of Arles ) ( d. c. 303 ), martyr . This saint is mentioned in the Martyrology of Jerome, in the writings of Prudentius, Venantius Fortunatus , Hilary , and Gregory of Tours , and there can be little doubt that he was a genuine martyr during the persecution of Maximian and Diocletian . His Legend calls him a notary who made shorthand summaries of judicial proceedings for the public archives. One day, while performing his duties in the presence of the judge, Genesius , who was a catechumen, was so offended by the edict of...

Honoratus of Arles

Honoratus of Arles   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
261 words

...character of Lérins, experienced by the English Benedict Biscop ( d. 689 ), may be seen as a natural development. This was in the distant future: Honoratus was appointed bishop of Arles in 427 , but did not live long in office. He was succeeded by Hilary, also from Lérins and probably a relative, who wrote about him and followed his ideals by founding a similar monastery at Arles. Feast: 16 January . Lérins is now a Cistercian monastery. Original texts in M. Labrousse, Saint Honorat (1995); B.L.S ., i. 111–2; Bibl. SS ., ix....

View: