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Aristotle's illusion

A tactile illusion that is created when the eyes are closed, two fingers of one hand are crossed, and a small object such as an acorn is pressed (especially by another person) into the ...

Aristotle's illusion

Aristotle's illusion n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...'s illusion n. A tactile illusion that is created when the eyes are closed, two fingers of one hand are crossed, and a small object such as an acorn is pressed (especially by another person) into the cleft between the tips of the crossed fingers. The sensation is that of touching two objects rather than one. The first written account of it was given by the Greek philosopher Aristotle ( 384–322 bc ) in the essay On Dreams in the Parva Naturalia : ‘When the fingers are crossed, one object seems to be two; but yet we deny that it is two; for sight...

Aristotle's illusion

Aristotle's illusion  

A tactile illusion that is created when the eyes are closed, two fingers of one hand are crossed, and a small object such as an acorn is pressed (especially by another person) into the cleft between ...
filled-space illusion

filled-space illusion  

A visual illusion in which a line, area, or volume appears larger if it is occupied by a number of distinct elements than if it is empty (see illustration). The first written reference to it is to be ...
moon illusion

moon illusion  

A visual illusion that causes the moon to appear relatively larger when it is near the horizon than when it is at its zenith, although in both cases it subtends the same visual angle of about ...
waterfall illusion

waterfall illusion  

A visual illusion of apparent movement created by gazing for a period of time at a fixed point in a waterfall and then looking at a stationary object, which appears to move upwards. It is usually ...
diplaesthesia

diplaesthesia  

An illusory experience of touching two objects when actually touching only one, occurring occasionally as a neurological sign. US diplesthesia. See also Aristotle's illusion. [From Greek diploos ...
Novum Organum

Novum Organum  

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Literature
A Latin treatise on scientific method, which F. Bacon included in his Instauratio Magna (1620). This ‘great renewal’ of natural philosophy (which Bacon never completed) involved a systematic ...
appearance

appearance  

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Subject:
Philosophy
1. The way something seems on the surface, as opposed to some underlying reality.2. In nonverbal communication, the way someone looks to an observer (e.g. body type, style of dress)—a key feature of ...
special effects

special effects  

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(SFX, visual effects)See also green screen; motion capture; rotoscope; travelling matte.1. In film and television, either trick shots designed to deceive the viewer—for example, the digital matte ...
epic theatre

epic theatre  

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Overview Page
Phrase taken from Aristotle, where it implies a series of incidents presented without regard to theatrical conventions, and used in the 1920s by such pioneers as Brecht and Piscator of ...
closure

closure  

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Subject:
Media studies
1. A satisfying sense of completion or completeness.2. A defining feature of a narrative that resolves all of the issues in a ‘proper ending’. See narrative closure.3. The processes by which a text ...
realism

realism  

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In Scholastic philosophy, the doctrine that attributes objective or absolute existence to universals, the principal exponent of which was St Thomas Aquinas. The opposite view is Nominalism.
vision

vision  

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The sense that enables perception of objects in the environment by means of the eyes.
metaphysics

metaphysics  

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Philosophy
According to Bradley, metaphysics is the finding of bad reasons for what we believe on instinct, although as Broad remarked, to find these reasons is no less an instinct. Originally a title for those ...
Pierre Corneille

Pierre Corneille  

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Literature
(1606–84),French dramatist, best known as the creator of French classical tragedy. He exerted a powerful influence on the English dramatists of the Restoration, particularly on Dryden, and on ...
Heraclitus

Heraclitus  

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(c.500 bc),Greek philosopher. He believed that fire is the origin of all things and that permanence is an illusion, everything being in a (harmonious) process of constant change.
mimesis

mimesis  

Imitation or mimicry. mimetic adj. Imitative; of or relating to mimesis. [From Greek mimesis imitation, from mimeisthai to imitate]
Old comedy (Greek)

Old comedy (Greek)  

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‘Old Comedy’ is best defined as the comedies produced at Athens during the 5th cent. bc. An early form of comedy was composed in Sicily by Epicharmus, the connection of which with Attic comedy is ...
perception

perception  

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The interpretation of sensory information using both the raw data detected by the senses and previous experience. Compare sensation.
tactile illusion

tactile illusion n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...illusion n . Any illusion of touch. See Aristotle’s illusion , Libet’s delay , rubber hand phenomenon , sensory saltation , size–weight illusion , thermal grill illusion . Compare auditory illusion , visual illusion...

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