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Aratus

Greek poet, c.315 to before 240 bc. Born in Cilicia, he studied at Athens, where he imbibed Stoicism from Zeno (2) and was introduced to Antigonus Gonatas, king of Macedon, who invited him ...

Aratus

Aratus (2) (271–213 bc)   Reference library

Peter Sidney Derow

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
468 words

...attacked Athens and Argos; in 229 Argos was brought into the Achaean Confederacy and Athens, with Aratus' help, was freed from Macedonian control. These years also saw the addition of Megalopolis ( 235 ) and Orchomenus ( 2 ) to the confederacy. The growth of Spartan power under Cleomenes (2) III changed much, especially against the backdrop of Aratus' failure to organize a strong Achaean army. After defeats by Cleomenes in 227 , Aratus opened negotiations with Antigonus ( 3 ) Doson of Macedon. The arrival of Doson in the Peloponnese in 224 ...

Aratus

Aratus   Quick reference

Peter Sidney Derow

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
382 words

...), frequently attacked Athens and Argos; in 229 Argos was brought into the Achaean Confederacy and Athens, with Aratus' help, was freed from Macedonian control. These years also saw the addition of Megalopolis ( 235 ) and Orchomenus to the confederacy. The growth of Spartan power under Cleomenes III changed much, especially against the backdrop of Aratus’ failure to organize a strong Achaean army. After defeats by Cleomenes in 227 , Aratus opened negotiations with Antigonus Doson of Macedon. The arrival of Doson in the Peloponnese in 224 and victory...

Arātus

Arātus   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
334 words

... , Greek poet , c. 315 to before 240 bc . Born in Cilicia, he studied at Athens, where he imbibed Stoicism from Zeno (2) and was introduced to Antigonus Gonatas, king of Macedon, who invited him to the court at Pella. There he celebrated the king's marriage, and composed a Hymn to Pan glorifying Antigonus' victory over the Celts ( 277 ). Aratus' best‐known work, and the only one extant, is a poem entitled Phaenomena (‘Celestial Phenomena’), undertaken at the suggestion of Antigonus. The first and longest part of this is a versification of a...

Aratus

Aratus (1) (c.315)   Reference library

G. J. Toomer

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
668 words

... and Iliad . Returning to Macedonia, he died there some time before the death of Antigonus (240/39). Aratus' best-known work, and the only one extant, is a poem entitled Phaenomena , undertaken at the suggestion of Antigonus. The first and longest part of this is a versification of a prose treatise by Eudoxus (1) of Cnidus which gave a detailed description of the make-up and relative positions of the constellations . After a proem to Zeus ( 1–18 ), Aratus describes the poles and the northern constellations ( 19–318 ), the southern constellations (...

Aratus

Aratus   Quick reference

G. J. Toomer

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
535 words

...and Iliad . Returning to Macedonia, he died there some time before the death of Antigonus ( 240/39 ). Aratus' best-known work, and the only one still extant, is a poem entitled Phaenomena , undertaken at the suggestion of Antigonus. The first and longest part of this is a versification of a prose treatise by Eudoxus of Cnidos which gave a detailed description of the make-up and relative positions of the constellations. After a proem to Zeus ( 1–18 ), Aratus describes the poles and the northern constellations ( 19–318 ), the southern constellations ( 322–453...

Ara'tus

Ara'tus   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
288 words

... 1. A Greek poet perhaps from Soli in Cilicia ( c. 315– c. 240 bc ), who studied at Athens. He subsequently spent part of his life at the court of Antigonus Gonatas, king of Macedon; there he wrote hymns for the king's marriage. His best-known work, and the only one still extant, is a didactic poem, the Phaenomena (‘Astronomy’), in 1,154 hexameters, describing with elegant clarity and little mythological allusion the relative positions of the chief stars and constellations, and their risings and settings; it is based on a prose treatise of the same...

Aratus

Aratus  

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(271–213bc), statesman from Sicyon west of Corinth. He fled to Argos after the murder of his father Cleinias in 264 and was educated there. In 251 he expelled the tyrant Nicocles from Sicyon and ...
Aratus

Aratus  

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Greek poet, c.315 to before 240 bc. Born in Cilicia, he studied at Athens, where he imbibed Stoicism from Zeno (2) and was introduced to Antigonus Gonatas, king of Macedon, who invited him to the ...
Acts

Acts   Reference library

Loveday Alexander and Loveday Alexander

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
42,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...God’ behind the universe ( v. 23 ). Greek philosophers had already popularized a kind of philosophical monotheism among more sophisticated pagan thinkers (this was one reason why Judaism attracted their respect), and Paul is able to use a line from the Stoic poet Aratus ( v. 28 ; Aratus, Phaenomena , 5) to reinforce his point: the same line had already been quoted by the Jewish apologist Aristobulus (Eusebius, Praep. Evang. 13.12.6). The similarities and differences between this speech and Paul's own survey of pagan religion in Rom 1–3 have...

The Wisdom of Solomon

The Wisdom of Solomon   Reference library

William Horbury and William Horbury

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
21,675 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...literature in general has some kinship with the proverbial and moralistic literature of the Greeks ( wis a . 4–8). If lack of Greek metre is overlooked, Wisdom broadly recalls the didactic poetry on philosophical and moral subjects which flourished in Hellenistic authors such as Aratus (3rd cent. bce ), found a Jewish echo in Ps.-Phoc, and was later imitated by Roman poets such as Lucretius, Virgil, and Horace ( wis a .4). The biblical allusions of Wisdom roughly correspond to classical dependence on Homer and the mythical tradition. Didactic compositions in...

Aratea

Aratea  

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Latin poems translated from Aratus (1) (his work was sometimes divided into Phaenomena and Diosemeiai) by the following. (1) P. Terentius Varro Atacinus. (2) M. Tullius Cicero (1) (see section ...
Achilles Tatius

Achilles Tatius  

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(probably 3rd cent. ad),author of a Greek commentary on Aratus (1), the only surviving part of his work Περὶ σφαίρας.Ed. E. Maass, Commentariorum in Aratum Reliquiae (1898), 25.[...]
Diotimus

Diotimus  

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Author of eleven epideictic and funerary epigrams included in the Garland of Meleager (2), perhaps the Adramyttian attacked by Aratus (1).A. S. F. Gow and D. L. Page, The Greek Anthology: Hellenistic ...
Cercidas of Megalopolis

Cercidas of Megalopolis  

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(fl. 225 bc),statesman, lawgiver, and poet. He negotiated c.226 with Aratus (2) of Sicyon and Antigonus (3) Doson to secure Macedonian support for the Achaean Confederacy against Cleomenes (2) ...
Boethus

Boethus  

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Of Sidon (2nd cent. bc), Stoic, pupil of Diogenes (3) of Babylon. He held unorthodox positions in some areas of Stoic physics: he rejected the ekpurōsis and derived soul from ...
Dikē

Dikē  

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Personification of Justice, daughter of Zeus and Themis, and one of the Horae. She reports men's wrongdoing to Zeus, and sits beside him. In Aratus and Roman poets she is the constellation Virgo or ...
Antigonus

Antigonus  

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(c. 263–221 bc),nicknamed ‘Doson’, ‘the man who will give’, regent and king of Macedonia 229–221. Son of Demetrius (5) ‘the Fair’, who was half-brother of Antigonus (2) Gonatas, Antigonus ...
Lydiadas

Lydiadas  

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Son of Eudamus, of Megalopolis (d. 227 bc). Commanded troops against Sparta (251), later (c.244) became tyrant (see tyranny) of Megalopolis. Under threat from the Achaean Confederacy he abdicated, ...
Persaeus

Persaeus  

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Of Citium (c. 306–c. 243 bc), Stoic (see Stoicism), brought up by Zeno (2), whose pupil he became. In 277, when Zeno declined the invitation of Antigonus (2) Gonatas to ...
Soteria

Soteria  

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The term was applied to a sacrifice or festival celebrating deliverance from danger, on behalf of individuals or a community. The gods in general (e.g. Xenophon Anabasis 3. 2. 9) ...

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