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Anytus

A rich Athenian and democratic leader, best known as a prosecutor of Socrates (399 bc). General in 409, he failed to prevent the loss of Pylos; at his trial he reportedly bribed the entire ...

Anytus

Anytus   Reference library

Michael Gagarin

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
130 words

... , a wealthy Athenian and democratic leader, best known as a prosecutor of Socrates ( 399 bc ). As general in 409 , he failed to prevent the loss of Pylos ( Ath. pol. 27. 5); at his trial he reportedly bribed the entire jury. After 403 bc he was a respected, moderate leader of the restored democracy. Plato (1) ( Meno 91) introduces him as a passionate enemy of the sophists . His prosecution of Socrates for impiety was probably motivated less by religious concerns than by anger at Socrates' disdain for democratic politicians. We hear nothing of...

Anytus

Anytus   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
86 words

... , a rich Athenian and democratic leader , best known as a prosecutor of Socrates ( 399 bc ). General in 409 , he failed to prevent the loss of Pylos ; at his trial he reportedly bribed the entire jury. After 403 he was a respected, moderate leader of the restored democracy. Plato ( Meno 91 ) introduces him as a passionate enemy of the sophists . His prosecution of Socrates for impiety was probably motivated less by religious concerns than by anger at Socrates' disdain of democratic...

A'nytus

A'nytus   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
61 words

... One of the three accusers who brought Socrates to trial on a charge of impiety ( See Apology of Socrates ). A wealthy Athenian, and a democrat in politics, he was represented by Plato in the Meno as an enemy of the sophists . He may have thought that by attacking Socrates he was acting in the best interests of...

Anytus

Anytus  

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A rich Athenian and democratic leader, best known as a prosecutor of Socrates (399 bc). General in 409, he failed to prevent the loss of Pylos; at his trial he reportedly bribed the entire jury. ...
Meletus

Meletus  

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Perhaps son of Meletus (1); the titular accuser of Socrates in 399 bc, though Anytus was Socrates' real opponent. He may be the Meletus who in 399 accused Andocides of ...
Polycrates

Polycrates  

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(c.440–370 bc)was an Athenian sophist best known for his (lost) fictitious ‘Accusation of Socrates’, written after 393/2 bc, and put in the mouth of Anytus. It may have stimulated Plato and Xenophon ...
Despoina

Despoina  

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‘The Mistress’, an Arcadian goddess worshipped at Lycosura together with her mother Demeter, her foster-father Anytus, and Artemis (Pausanias 8. 37. 3–9); there was an altar to her father, Poseidon ...
Polycratēs

Polycratēs   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
62 words

... 2 ( c. 440–370 bc ) was an Athenian sophist best known for his (lost) fictitious ‘Accusation of Socrates ’, written after 393/2 bc , and put in the mouth of Anytus . It may have stimulated Plato and Xenophon to write in Socrates' defence. The speech was known to Libanius , who composed an elaborate ‘defence’ partly at least in reply to...

Melē'tus

Melē'tus   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
65 words

...Nominal accuser of Socrates in 399 bc , though Anytus was the real antagonist. He was perhaps the son of the tragic poet of the same name who is mocked by the comic poets; it is also possible that he was the Meletus who prosecuted Andocides for impiety in 400 (and the real author of the sixth speech of Lysias ). The name is very...

Damophon

Damophon   Reference library

Andrew F. Stewart

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
152 words

... Zeus at Olympia and made marble cult statues for cities of the Achaean Confederacy : Messene, Aegium, Megalopolis , and Lycosura in Arcadia. Substantial fragments of the last have survived, comprising Demeter and Despoina enthroned, with Artemis and the Titan Anytus. They show that Damophon was an eclectic neoclassicist who attempted to update the style of Phidias while paying close attention to the needs of the cult's devotees. Pausanias thought his work important enough to describe at length (8. 37. 1–6, etc.); other connoisseurs ignored...

Meletus

Meletus   Reference library

Michael Gagarin and Andrew Brown

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
146 words

..., a rather common name, and a source of difficulty to scholars. (1) A tragic poet attacked by Aristophanes ( 1 ) (frs. 117, 156 KA); (2) The titular accuser of Socrates in 399 bc , though Anytus was Socrates’ real opponent. He was the son of a Meletus, probably Meletus (1), but it may have been the son, not the father, who wrote an Oedipodeia (Ar. fr. 453 KA). He may also be the Meletus who in 399 accused Andocides of impiety ( On the Mysteries 94) and the author of the speech against Andocides preserved as Lysias 6; (3) The writer of...

Polycrates

Polycrates (2) (c.440–370 bc)   Reference library

Donald Andrew Frank Moore Russell

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
161 words

... (2) ( c. 440–370 bc ) was an Athenian sophist who spent his latter years in Cyprus, and is best known for his (lost) fictitious ‘Accusation of Socrates ’ (κατηγορία Σωκράτους), written after 393 / 2 bc , and put in the mouth of Anytus . The defences of Socrates by Plato (1) and Xenophon (1) seem to be responses to Polycrates. His speech was known to Libanius , who composed an elaborate ‘defence’ partly at least in reply to it. Polycrates also practised the genre of ‘paradoxical encomia’; his encomium on Busiris roused Isocrates to...

Despoina

Despoina   Reference library

Madeleine Jost

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
196 words

..., ‘The Mistress’, an Arcadian goddess worshipped at Lycosura together with her mother Demeter , her foster-father Anytus , and Artemis (Paus. 8. 37. 3–9); there was an altar to her father, Poseidon Hippios, near the temple. The cult group inside the temple of Despoina was the work of Damophon of Messene, late 3rd or early 2nd cent. bc . Important fragments remain. We do not know Despoina's actual name, since it was kept secret from those who were not initiates of her mysteries. Her character is related to that of Kore ( Persephone ) in Attica;...

Arcadian cults and myths

Arcadian cults and myths   Reference library

Madeleine Jost

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
695 words

...deities are peculiar to the region, such as Alea, who was for a long time an independent goddess, and who even when associated with and finally assimilated to Athena always retained her importance. The same is true of Despoina , ‘the Mistress’, worshipped at Lycosura , and of Anytus, her foster-father, while the Great Goddesses have their origin around Megalopolis . Some cult groupings have a distinctive composition ( Poseidon and Demeter ), while others are characteristically Arcadian in the relative importance of the individual deities (thus the...

Apology of Socrates

Apology of Socrates (‘Socrates’ Defence')   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
585 words

...of Socrates ( Apologia Sokratous ) (‘Socrates’ Defence') 1. Plato's version of three speeches made by Socrates in 399 bc in the Athenian law-courts, answering the charge of impiety that was brought against him by Meletus on behalf of the poets, Anytus on behalf of the craftsmen and politicians, and Lycon on behalf of the orators. How far it represents Socrates' actual words is unknown. In the first speech, the actual defence, Socrates distinguishes between previous vague accusations (that he speculated about questions of cosmology and physics, and...

So'cratēs

So'cratēs (469–399 bc)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
1,476 words

...voted against the illegal proposal to try them en masse. Under the Thirty Tyrants he risked his own life by refusing to assist in the arrest of an innocent man condemned to death by the Thirty. His manner of life won him many enemies, and in 399 he was brought to trial by Anytus (a democratic politician), Meletus, and Lycon on the charge of not believing in the same gods as the Athenians but introducing new gods, and of corrupting the youth of the city. The death penalty was asked for. Two versions of Socrates' speech in his own defence exist: in the ...

Xenophon

Xenophon   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,958 words

...various carefree observations made after the trial was over. The stated purpose is to explain the ‘big‐talking’ which previous writers agreed was a feature of Socrates' reaction to prosecution and show why he did not fear death. (Opportunity is also found to note the prosecutor Anytus ' son's history of alcohol abuse). Symposium . ‘In writing of great men it is proper to record not only their serious activities but their diversions’, and entertainment at Callias' (2) party is a mixture of cabaret (music, song, and dance, a sexually titillating tableau of ...

Xenophon

Xenophon (1)   Reference library

Christopher J. Tuplin

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
3,437 words

...observations made after the trial was over. The stated purpose is to explain the megalēgoria (‘big-talking’) which previous writers agreed was a feature of Socrates' reaction to prosecution and show why he did not fear death. (Opportunity is also found to note the prosecutor Anytus ' son's history of alcohol abuse). Symposium . ‘In writing of great men it is proper to record not only their serious activities but their diversions’ (1. 1), and entertainment at Callias (4) 's party is a mixture of cabaret (music, song, and dance, a sexually titillating...

Xenophon

Xenophon   Reference library

Christopher J. Tuplin

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
2,890 words

...observations made after the trial was over. The stated purpose is to explain the megalēgoria (‘big-talking’) which previous writers agreed was a feature of Socrates’ reaction to prosecution and show why he did not fear death. (Opportunity is also found to note the prosecutor Anytus’ son’s history of alcohol abuse). Symposium ‘In writing of great men it is proper to record not only their serious activities but their diversions’ (1. 1), and entertainment at Callias’ party is a mixture of cabaret (music, song, and dance, a sexually titillating tableau of ...

Xenophon

Xenophon   Quick reference

Christopher J. Tuplin

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
2,796 words

...observations made after the trial was over. The stated purpose is to explain the megalēgoria (‘big-talking’) which previous writers agreed was a feature of Socrates' reaction to prosecution and show why he did not fear death. (Opportunity is also found to note the prosecutor Anytus' son's history of alcohol abuse.) Symposium . ‘In writing of great men it is proper to record not only their serious activities but their diversions’ (1. 1), and entertainment at Callias's party is a mixture of cabaret (music, song, and dance, a sexually titillating tableau of...

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