You are looking at 1-11 of 11 entries  for:

  • All: Annaeus Cornutus, Lucius x
clear all

View:

Overview

Annaeus Cornutus, Lucius

(1st cent. ad), Stoic philosopher, grammarian, and rhetorician whose pupils included Lucan and Persius (who honoured him in Satirae 5, and whose Satires he reportedly revised ...

Annaeus Cornutus, Lucius

Annaeus Cornutus, Lucius   Reference library

Leofranc Adrian Holford-Strevens

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
314 words

... Cornutus, Lucius (1st cent. ad), Stoic philosopher, grammarian, and rhetorician whose pupils included Lucan and Persius (who honoured him in Sat. 5, and whose Satires he reportedly revised after the poet's death); exiled by Nero. His Life, now lost, was the last in Diog. Laert. 7; the description Λεπτίτης ( Suda ), denoting a citizen (not merely native) of Lepcis Magna , refutes the common supposition that he was the younger Seneca's freedman, though patronage remains plausible. His one extant work (conjectural title Ἐπιδρομὴ τῶν κατὰ τὴν...

Cornū'tus, Lucius Annae'us

Cornū'tus, Lucius Annae'us   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
15 words

..., Lucius Annae'us Philosopher at Rome in the first century ad . See Lucan and Persius...

Annaeus Cornutus, Lucius

Annaeus Cornutus, Lucius  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1st cent. ad),Stoic philosopher, grammarian, and rhetorician whose pupils included Lucan and Persius (who honoured him in Satirae 5, and whose Satires he reportedly revised after the poet's death) ...
Lucan

Lucan  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Roman poet (ad 39–65), b. Corduba. His father, Annaeus Mela, was an equestrian and brother of Seneca the Younger. Mela came to Rome when his son was about eight months old. There Lucan received the ...
Persius

Persius (34–62ce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
931 words

...on his life was the Stoic Lucius Annaeus Cornutus, a freedman of the family of Seneca, with whom he studied in Rome and to whom he bequeathed a large sum of money and his library of seven hundred books. Persius pays tribute to Cornutus in Satire 5. The poet Lucan, whom he met through Cornutus, greatly admired Persius’ poetry. His book of satires, unfinished at his death but edited by Cornutus and published by Caesius Bassus (the addressee of Satire 6), was an instant success. The biography reports that Cornutus altered a line in Satire 1 that...

Persius Flaccus, Aulus

Persius Flaccus, Aulus   Quick reference

Emily J. Gowers

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
603 words

...( ad 34–62 ), Neronian satirist; see NERO . His ancient biography records that he was a rich equestrian of Etruscan stock who died young and who was connected with the Stoic opposition to Nero through his links with Publius Clodius Thrasea Paetus and the philosopher Lucius Annaeus Cornutus. However, Persius' satires are isolated and introverted works, more concerned with inner, philosophical freedom than with political liberty. The ‘biting truth’ he reveals (1. 107) is confined to moral crassness, literary bad taste, and his own failings. Persius claims to...

Lucan

Lucan (39–65ce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,514 words

...(Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, 39–65 ce ), Roman poet . Lucan was born in Corduba (modern Córdoba), Spain, on 3 November 39 ce , to a wealthy and prominent equestrian family. His father, Marcus Annaeus Mela , an imperial procurator, was the son of Seneca the Elder; his paternal uncles were the younger Seneca and Lucius Annaeus Novatus (the Gallio mentioned in Acts 18). Mela brought Lucan to Rome as an infant. He was given an aristocratic education and excelled at rhetoric. He studied philosophy, probably, with the Stoic Lucius Annaeus Cornutus and later...

Lucan

Lucan (39–65)   Reference library

Philip Russell Hardie

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,223 words

... ( Marcus Annaeus Lucanus ) ( ad 39–65 ) , was born at Corduba (mod. Córdoba), 3 November ad 39 . His father, Marcus Annaeus Mela, was a Roman knight and brother of the younger Seneca . Mela came to Rome when his son was about eight months old. There Lucan received the typical élite education, ending with the school of rhetoric, where he was a great success ( see education, roman ); he probably also studied Stoic philosophy under Lucius Annaeus Cornutus, a connection of Seneca. He continued his studies at Athens, but was recalled by Nero , who...

Lucan

Lucan   Quick reference

William Blair Anderson and Philip Russell Hardie

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,195 words

...( ad 39–65 ), the poet, was born at Corduba (mod. Córdoba), 3 November ad 39 . His father, Marcus Annaeus Mela , was a Roman knight and brother of Seneca the Younger . Mela came to Rome when his son was about eight months old. There Lucan received the typical élite education, ending with the school of rhetoric, where he was a great success; he probably also studied Stoic philosophy under Lucius Annaeus Cornutus , a connection of Seneca. He continued his studies at Athens, but was recalled by Nero , who admitted him to his inner circle and...

Philosophy

Philosophy   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
11,547 words

...more widespread under the Principate. The Alexandrian philosopher Arius was an intimate adviser to Augustus and Livia Drusilla, the Platonist Thrasyllus was closely connected to Tiberius, and Persius and Seneca's nephew Lucan were devoted students of the Stoic teacher Lucius Annaeus Cornutus (whose name indicates personal ties to Seneca's family). Philosophy's fortunes under Roman rule were not always so happy. Athens’ decision to join Mithradates in revolt in 88 bce , though swiftly crushed by Sulla's devastating siege that laid waste the Academy, had...

Hermeneutics

Hermeneutics   Reference library

V. Hösle

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
4,845 words

...into account his own remarks about interpretation. The other great interpretanda of the ancients were religious texts. The allegorical interpretation of pagan myths began probably with Theagenes of Rhegium in the 6th c. bce ; it was fully elaborated by the Stoics. Lucius Annaeus Cornutus ’s work is preserved; it offers, based on mostly invalid etymologies, an interpretation of the divinities as natural elements. The Neoplatonic interpretation of the gods connects them to metaphysical strata of reality. Since only the Jewish and Christian religions are...

View: