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Anglo-Saxon type

The type’s history exemplifies the political aspect of letterforms. The original impetus for Anglo-Saxon type came as part of M. Parker’s campaign to establish an English Church on the ...

Anglo-Saxon type

Anglo-Saxon type   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
251 words

... Anglo-Saxon type —principally for quotations—to help establish the antiquity and authority of their claims. Somewhat later, scholars of linguistics and literature needed Anglo-Saxon type for whole texts in Old English, such as the *Anglo-Saxon Chronicle , * Beowulf , *grammars , and *dictionaries . The type was usually a hybrid, combining an essentially *roman alphabet with the necessary additional special *sort s for Anglo-Saxon characters and *abbreviation s. There were three sets of 16 th -century Anglo-Saxon type s and another four in the...

Anglo-Saxon type

Anglo-Saxon type  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The type’s history exemplifies the political aspect of letterforms. The original impetus for Anglo-Saxon type came as part of M. Parker’s campaign to establish an English Church on the basis ...
Place-Names

Place-Names   Quick reference

Margaret Gelling

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,757 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in the chronology of the AngloSaxon settlement, and they believed that it was possible to identify place‐names of certain types which could be plotted on maps and presented as the earliest sites occupied by the English. As the work of the Survey proceeded, however, it became increasingly apparent that many of the names highlighted by these scholars were in improbable situations for early settlements, and that there were serious discrepancies between their distribution and that of the sites where the earliest AngloSaxon archaeological material was...

Landscape History: The Countryside

Landscape History: The Countryside   Quick reference

H. S. A. Fox

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,175 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...roots, whereas in others, notably the Weald, it was of a secondary type, as in Arden. Three advances in our knowledge since the publication of The Making of the English Landscape should be singled out for special attention. The first is the emerging consensus which places the origins of nucleated settlements in village landscapes towards the end of the AngloSaxon period, rather than at the beginning, where Hoskins (and his contemporaries) placed them, believing that people of AngloSaxon stock ‘swept all before them and built and planted afresh’....

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,654 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...History ( 1968 ). †‘Folklore’ itself was a term coined as late as 1846 , though it rapidly caught on. A great surge of activity, indeed, marked the years between the foundation of the Folklore Society itself in 1878 and the First World War. It was during this period, when AngloSaxon village folkmoots ( see moot ) were being seen as exhibiting the seeds of British democracy, that specific links were established between ‘local history’ and folklore, whether in the work of Laurence Gomme (e.g. The Village Community ( 1890 ) or that of Charlotte Burne ,...

Agricultural History

Agricultural History   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,344 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...shifted their attention from the history of the manor to the origins of the village and its associated field systems. The old belief that the village was imported by the first AngloSaxons in the 5th century has been abandoned. A degree of continuity between the Roman and medieval countryside is now accepted, and archaeologists have concluded from the absence of early AngloSaxon deposits below deserted medieval villages , and the discovery of small, scattered sites elsewhere, that the village was a later form of settlement. Some villages were formed...

Utopianism

Utopianism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,929 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...earth again, and the reign of Innocence and Concord is going to be revived among mankind.’ The initial impetus fuelling this burst of idealism was the *American Revolution , which soon joined more familar but persistently influential models drawn from Roman, Greek, Venetian, Anglo-Saxon, and Celtic antiquity as an ideal of European utopianism. Radical political thought in Britain was widely inspired by the notion that the more equitable conditions of society in the young United States could be emulated in Europe. Utopian conceptions of America also encouraged...

Local and Regional History: Modern Approaches

Local and Regional History: Modern Approaches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,365 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of defining a region is one that has been much aired by historians and historical geographers. At the macro‐level England cannot be divided satisfactorily into recognizable units based on former kingdoms or principalities, like those of France, Germany, or Italy. Few of the AngloSaxon tribal divisions had much meaning after England became a united country in the 11th century. Although the differences between one part of the country and another are clear for all to see, English regional identities are imprecise and no firm boundaries can be drawn. At the...

Family History

Family History   Quick reference

Anthony Camp

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,329 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the relating of that history to the social and economic history of the time, has been a slow process over a long period. Although the Saxons produced fictitious pedigrees linking Irish and British traditional genealogies with those of the Bible and classical antiquity, whose fullest development was seen in the British history of Geoffrey of Monmouth written about 1135, there is little other evidence of AngloSaxon concern with genealogy. After the Norman Conquest it was the legal aspect of individual pedigrees for particular purposes, as in the...

Towns

Towns   Quick reference

David M. Palliser

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,140 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...irrelevant. Their surveyors had a remarkable talent for spotting good sites, and nearly all their towns were reoccupied in the Middle Ages. Until the 1950s it was possible to argue, from the documentary evidence, that towns in the economic sense did not reappear until late AngloSaxon or even Norman times. However, archaeology has made it clear since the 1960s that towns reappeared in England as early as the 7th century. The earliest were apparently trading centres on coasts and rivers (places called wic or emporium in contemporary documents), but...

Enlightenment

Enlightenment   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
7,794 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...expectations that the existing world could be reformed and transformed. Like many in the Enlightenment generally, they were primitivists and progressives. They hoped to purify Christianity of the corruption of the ages and to restore English people to their natural and Anglo-Saxon political rights. Typically, and somewhat inconsistently, in combining natural and historic rights they believed that the lost rights which they wished to recover were also appropriate for all humankind. Contractual and historical thinking of this sort inspired the *Society...

Etymology

Etymology   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,700 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Latin/French Anglo-Saxon enchiridion manual handbook hypogeal subterranean underground prolegomenon prologue foreword prophesy predict foretell sarcophagous carnivorous meat-eating But others have undergone differentiation to varying degrees: Greek Latin/French Anglo-Saxon —— postpartum afterbirth prodrome precursor forerunner prognosis prescience foreknowledge sympathy compassion fellow feeling thesis position placement Those listings show that the Greek derivatives tend to be the most arcane, the Latin a little less so, and the Anglo-Saxon not at all. But...

sæx

sæx  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[Ar]In Old English a sæx was a single‐edged knife or cleaver; examples are commonly found in Saxon and Anglo‐Saxon graves. Continental versions have a curving back while English types (late 6th ...
runic knot

runic knot  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Type of intricate interlacing ornament associated with Anglo-Saxon and Celtic work, especially high crosses, but also found in Romanesque design.Rickman (1848);Jane Turner (1996)
cone beaker

cone beaker  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[Ar]Type of Anglo‐Saxon glass drinking vessel made in the form of an elongated cone. Mainly 5th to 7th century ad.
Viking ornament

Viking ornament  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Style of ornament produced in Scandinavia and in Scandinavian colonies from C8 to C12, consisting of interlacing elements linked to zoömorphic forms in continuous complex designs. For architectural ...
buttress

buttress  

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Overview Page
Pier-like projection of brick, masonry, or other material, built either in close connection with a wall needing extra stability, or standing isolated, to counter the outward thrust of an arch, vault, ...
claw beaker

claw beaker  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[Ar]A type of glass drinking vessel common in the 6th and 7th centuries in early Anglo‐Saxon and Frankish graves in northern France, the Low Countries, and eastern England. It is basically a simple ...
Pike

Pike  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Character type in American humor, a genus of Western immigrant during the pioneering period of the mid-19th century. The Pike characters were traditionally natives of Pike County, although this ...
ideal type

ideal type  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Ideal types in sociology are most closely associated with the name of Max Weber, although as a method of investigation and explanation they are more commonly found in economics, for example in the ...

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