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Anglo-Saxon Law

The law of the various Germanic peoples who conquered much of Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries laid the foundation for the medieval common law. Anglo-Saxon law's norms, ...

Anglo-Saxon Law

Anglo-Saxon Law   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
6,603 words
Illustration(s):
1

...-Saxon Law . The law of the various Germanic peoples who conquered much of Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries laid the foundation for the medieval common law. Anglo-Saxon law's norms, institutions, and practices developed during a period of both political consolidation (seventh and eighth centuries) and foreign invasion by Scandinavians (ninth–eleventh centuries) and Normans (late eleventh and early twelfth centuries). Sources. Anglo-Saxon law ( c.600–1066 ) survives in numerous sources but is not represented in its totality by all of these sources,...

Anglo‐Saxon law and custom

Anglo‐Saxon law and custom   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
700 words

...‐Saxon law and custom The AngloSaxon period, particularly from the end of the ninth century, has a very important place in the development of English law. Our knowledge of its law and custom is derived primarily from sets of laws, some surviving anonymously, others in the names of kings from Æthelberht of Kent in c. 600 to Cnut in the first half of the eleventh century; from charters recording land grants; from various other documents including writs (letters, generally royal letters) and wills; and from accounts of disputes in other sources including...

Anglo-Saxon Law

Anglo-Saxon Law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The law of the various Germanic peoples who conquered much of Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries laid the foundation for the medieval common law. Anglo-Saxon law's norms, institutions ...
Language

Language   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,614 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...argued was mired in the peculiarities of trade and region. Reinforcing Tooke's philosophical account of language was a historical insistence that Anglo-Saxon was the foundation of modern English. Where philosophers like Harris and Burnett wanted an English which reflected what they took to be the rational purity of a universal grammar derived by analogy from the classical languages, Tooke celebrated the Anglo-Saxon origins of English. The occlusion of these origins was for Tooke the linguistic equivalent of the Norman usurpation of ancient English liberties...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,654 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...History ( 1968 ). †‘Folklore’ itself was a term coined as late as 1846 , though it rapidly caught on. A great surge of activity, indeed, marked the years between the foundation of the Folklore Society itself in 1878 and the First World War. It was during this period, when AngloSaxon village folkmoots ( see moot ) were being seen as exhibiting the seeds of British democracy, that specific links were established between ‘local history’ and folklore, whether in the work of Laurence Gomme (e.g. The Village Community ( 1890 ) or that of Charlotte Burne ,...

Agricultural History

Agricultural History   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,344 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...shifted their attention from the history of the manor to the origins of the village and its associated field systems. The old belief that the village was imported by the first AngloSaxons in the 5th century has been abandoned. A degree of continuity between the Roman and medieval countryside is now accepted, and archaeologists have concluded from the absence of early AngloSaxon deposits below deserted medieval villages , and the discovery of small, scattered sites elsewhere, that the village was a later form of settlement. Some villages were formed...

Utopianism

Utopianism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,929 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...earth again, and the reign of Innocence and Concord is going to be revived among mankind.’ The initial impetus fuelling this burst of idealism was the *American Revolution , which soon joined more familar but persistently influential models drawn from Roman, Greek, Venetian, Anglo-Saxon, and Celtic antiquity as an ideal of European utopianism. Radical political thought in Britain was widely inspired by the notion that the more equitable conditions of society in the young United States could be emulated in Europe. Utopian conceptions of America also encouraged...

5 The European Medieval Book

5 The European Medieval Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
9,862 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...by hand. This is the period that is now called the Middle Ages. Medieval Europe evolved out of the collapse of the Roman empire (Rome finally fell in 476 ) and emerged in the early kingdoms of Lombardy and in the provinces of Germany, Frankish Gaul, Visigothic Spain, and Anglo-Saxon England. This era is intimately tied up with the history of Christianity, which is a literate religion, like Judaism and Islam. Books—manuscripts (MSS)—were essential to Christianity’s success and consolidation. The Scriptures, with written commentaries and interpretations,...

Antiquarianism (Popular)

Antiquarianism (Popular)   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,164 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...purposes is to analyse these ‘Opinions and Ceremonies … [to shew] which may be retained, and which ought to be laid aside’. Yet in a sense he preserved the dubious practices by publishing them; he moreover dignified his region by giving Northumbrians an antiquity back to the Anglo-Saxons, Britons, and Romans. In turn Brand, who liked to ridicule Bourne for piety and fustiness (‘wholesome meat … brought on upon wooden platters’) elevated his predecessor into the co-author of a remarkably influential book. In 1777 , and even more in the expanded posthumous...

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...existence of planetary influences and the worship of trees and wells antedated the conversion to Christianity. What matters more to the historian, however, is the continuities of popular beliefs and the ways in which these expressed a fusion of the pagan and the Christian. In AngloSaxon charms, for example, frequent reference is made to the baleful effects of ‘elf‐shot’ on the health of farm animals. It is remarkable, therefore, that flint arrowheads or flakes were still being described in this way earlier in the 20th century. More broadly, it was the Church...

Democracy

Democracy   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,165 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...civil liberties had been won after many struggles, but many political theorists and propagandists argued that the people had a claim to even greater political rights. The intellectual supports for these arguments were informed by three basic traditions: the idea of an ancient Anglo-Saxon *constitution , enshrining the genuine liberties of Englishmen lost at the Norman Conquest; a Lockean tradition of *natural rights theory which was given a radical and democratic thrust in Thomas *Paine 's Rights of Man ( 1791 ); and an emerging tradition of philosophical...

Enlightenment

Enlightenment   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
7,794 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...expectations that the existing world could be reformed and transformed. Like many in the Enlightenment generally, they were primitivists and progressives. They hoped to purify Christianity of the corruption of the ages and to restore English people to their natural and Anglo-Saxon political rights. Typically, and somewhat inconsistently, in combining natural and historic rights they believed that the lost rights which they wished to recover were also appropriate for all humankind. Contractual and historical thinking of this sort inspired the *Society...

Towns

Towns   Quick reference

David M. Palliser

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,140 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...irrelevant. Their surveyors had a remarkable talent for spotting good sites, and nearly all their towns were reoccupied in the Middle Ages. Until the 1950s it was possible to argue, from the documentary evidence, that towns in the economic sense did not reappear until late AngloSaxon or even Norman times. However, archaeology has made it clear since the 1960s that towns reappeared in England as early as the 7th century. The earliest were apparently trading centres on coasts and rivers (places called wic or emporium in contemporary documents), but...

Etymology

Etymology   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,700 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Latin/French Anglo-Saxon enchiridion manual handbook hypogeal subterranean underground prolegomenon prologue foreword prophesy predict foretell sarcophagous carnivorous meat-eating But others have undergone differentiation to varying degrees: Greek Latin/French Anglo-Saxon —— postpartum afterbirth prodrome precursor forerunner prognosis prescience foreknowledge sympathy compassion fellow feeling thesis position placement Those listings show that the Greek derivatives tend to be the most arcane, the Latin a little less so, and the Anglo-Saxon not at all. But...

Alla

Alla  

The king of Northumbria in The Man of Law's Tale (the name is that of an historical 6th-c. Anglo-Saxon king).
Edward

Edward  

(d. 924),king of England (899–924), known as ‘the Elder’. Up to 910 when he won a decisive victory against the Danes at Tettenhall in Staffordshire, Edward was involved first in suppressing a revolt ...
Lex Saxonum

Lex Saxonum  

Law code issued by Charlemagne in 803 as part of his effort to conquer and Christianize the pagan Saxons and incorporate them into the Carolingian empire. The Lex Saxonum consists ...
Rhenish Capitalism

Rhenish Capitalism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A system of capitalism characterized by non‐market patterns of coordination by economic actors and extensive state‐regulation of market outcomes. The term Rhenish Capitalism was popularized by Michel ...
Hywel

Hywel  

(d. 949/50),king of much of Wales (c. 904–49/50), known as Hywel Dda (‘the Good’). The grandson of Rhodri Mawr, king of Gwynedd, he and his brother inherited Seisyllwg from their father Cadell. He ...
county court

county court  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The shire or county courts were the most important of the communal courts which governed all aspects of local life in Anglo‐Saxon and Norman England. The shire court gradually declined with the ...

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