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Andrew Jackson

(1767–1845) US general and Democratic statesman, 7th President of the USA (1829–37). After waging several campaigns against American Indians, he defeated a British army at New ...

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew (1767–1845)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
125 words

..., Andrew ( 1767–1845 ) Seventh US president ( 1829–37 ). Jackson became a national hero in the War of 1812 when he defeated the British at New Orleans ( 1815 ). Jackson's popular appeal narrowly failed to defeat John Quincy Adams in the 1824 presidential election. His supporters built the basis of the new Democratic Party and Jackson was elected with John C. Calhoun as his vice president in 1828 . Jackson faced staunch opposition from the establishment and set up a spoils system of political appointments. Calhoun resigned over the...

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew (1767–1845)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
65 words

..., Andrew ( 1767–1845 ) US general and Democratic statesman, 7th President of the USA ( 1829–37 ) . After waging several campaigns against American Indians, he defeated a British army at New Orleans ( 1815 ) and successfully invaded Florida (1818). As President, he replaced an estimated 20% of those in public office with Democrat supporters, a practice that became known as the spoils system....

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew   Reference library

Daniel Feller

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
985 words

...Biddle. A cabinet crisis erupted in 1829 when the wife of Vice President Calhoun ostracized Peggy Eaton , the daughter of a Washington innkeeper and wife of Jackson's secretary of war. Jackson defended Peggy, and the resulting controversy helped push Calhoun into opposition and open the way for Martin Van Buren , Jackson's 1832 running mate to win the presidency in 1836 . Andrew Jackson was both a champion and symbol of democracy, the first westerner and self-made man to achieve the presidency, yet also a wealthy slaveholder. The preeminent public...

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew (1767–1845)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

..., Andrew ( 1767–1845 ), War of 1812 general and seventh president of the United States. Jackson first experienced war at thirteen, fighting in the Battle of Hanging Rock, South Carolina ( 6 August 1780 ). Subsequently captured, he remained uncooperative and was slashed by a British officer, creating an antipathy as permanent as the scar on his face. Jackson's entire family perished in the Revolutionary War . In 1788 , Jackson moved to western North Carolina (now Tennessee), where he served as a field‐grade officer in the Tennessee militia and was...

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to the United States Government

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
2,073 words

...of the Civil War. After leaving the White House, Jackson retired to the Hermitage, where he lived in poor health until his death on June 8, 1845 . See also Adams, John Quincy ; Calhoun, John C. ; Removal power ; Van Buren, Martin Sources Richard Ellis , The Union at Risk: Jacksonian Democracy, States' Rights, and the Nullification Crisis (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989). Robert V. Remini , Andrew Jackson , 3 vols. (New York: Harper & Row, 1970–84). Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. , The Age of Jackson (Boston: Little, Brown,...

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew (1767–1845)   Reference library

Daniel Feller

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...of ; Revolutionary War (1775–1783) ; and War of 1812 .] Bibliography Burstein, Andrew . The Passions of Andrew Jackson . New York: Random House Digital, 2003. Meacham, Jon . American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House . New York: Random House Digital, 2009. Remini, Robert V. , and Wesley K. Clark . Andrew Jackson . New York: Macmillan, 2009. Wilentz, Sean . Andrew Jackson . New York: Macmillan, 2005. Daniel...

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew (15 Mar. 1767)   Reference library

Kermit L. Hall

The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Law
Length:
582 words

..., Andrew (b. Waxhaw, S.C., 15 Mar. 1767 ; d. near Nashville, Tenn., 8 June 1845 ), president of the United States, 1829–1837 . During his two terms, President Andrew Jackson made six appointments to the high court, more than any other president except George Washington , William Howard Taft , and Franklin D. Roosevelt . Though Jackson took account of such traditional criteria as geography and public service, he calculated the political gain to be realized through his selections. In nominating John McLean of Ohio, a presidential aspirant...

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew (1767–1845)   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

..., Andrew ( 1767–1845 ) U.S. Army major general and 7th president of the United States ( 1829–37 ), born in the Waxhaw Settlement, South Carolina . At the age of thirteen Jackson participated in the Revolutionary War , probably as a courier, and was captured by the British. He later settled in Tennessee, where he practiced law and eventually entered politics. In 1796 he was elected to represent the new state of Tennessee in the U.S. Congress. His legislative record there, and during a brief term in the Senate the following year, was...

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew   Reference library

Daniel Feller

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
1,011 words

... Jackson himself was always controversial. For him, politics was personal, whether the opponent was Henry Clay , John Marshall , John Calhoun , or Nicholas Biddle . A cabinet crisis erupted in 1829 when the wife of Vice President Calhoun ostracized Peggy Eaton, the daughter of a Washington innkeeper and wife of  Jackson ’s secretary of war. Jackson defended Peggy, and the resulting controversy helped push Calhoun into opposition and open the way for Martin Van Buren , Jackson ’s 1832 running mate, to win the presidency in 1836 . Andrew...

Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew (1767–1845)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
526 words

..., Andrew ( 1767–1845 ), 7th President of the U.S. ( 1829–37 ), was born in the backwoods country of South Carolina, and at the age of 13 participated in Revolutionary War battles. He was admitted to the bar in North Carolina ( 1787 ), in a western district that is now a part of Tennessee. He helped draft the constitution of Tennessee ( 1796 ), and served in Congress as a representative ( 1796–97 ) and a senator ( 1797–98 ), later becoming a judge of the state supreme court and major general of the state militia. He took the side of Burr in the latter's...

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
123 words

...0Andrew Andrew Jackson 1767 – 1845 American Democratic statesman , 7th President of the US 1829–37 Our Federal Union: it must be preserved. toast given on the Jefferson Birthday Celebration, 13 April 1830; in Thomas Hart Benton Thirty Years' View (1856) vol. 1 Our federal Union Our Federal union Union: it must be preserved Each public officer who takes an oath to support the constitution swears that he will support it as he understands it, and not as it is understood by others. vetoing the bill to re-charter the Bank of the United States...

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
129 words

...0Andrew Andrew Jackson 1767 – 1845 American Democratic statesman ; 7th President 1829–37 Our Federal Union: it must be preserved. toast given on the Jefferson Birthday Celebration, 13 April 1830 Our Federal union Union: it must be preserved Each public officer who takes an oath to support the constitution swears that he will support it as he understands it, and not as it is understood by others. vetoing the bill to re-charter the Bank of the United States Presidential message, 10 July 1832, in H. S. Commager (ed.) Documents of American History ...

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
813 words

...by future Supreme Court Justice Roger B. Taney, then Jackson's Secretary of the Treasury veto statement, Bank Renewal Bill, July 10, 1832 It's a damn poor mind, indeed, which can't think of at least two ways to spell a word. In fact, as noted by Jackson's biographer Robert Remini, the great man was quite capable of writing “a single word or name four different ways on the same page” ( The Life of Andrew Jackson , 1988) attributed Oh, do not cry—be good children and we will all meet in heaven. Jackson, on his deathbed, to his griefstricken household June 8,...

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
270 words

...0Andrew Andrew Jackson 1767 – 1845 American Democratic statesman ; 7th President of the US, 1829–37 . On Jackson: see clay The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. proclamation to the people of Louisiana from Mobile, 21 September 1814 refuses to defend his rights deserves to be a slave The brave man inattentive to his duty, is worth little more to his country, than the coward who deserts her in the hour of...

Downing, Andrew Jackson

Downing, Andrew Jackson (1815–52)   Reference library

W. Barksdale Maynard

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
153 words

...Andrew Jackson ( 1815–52 ) US architect , landscape designer , and writer . A famous tastemaker in the early republic, Downing built a house ( 1838–9 , demolished) in Elizabethan style copying a British pattern book . He began writing copiously on architecture and landscape as editor of The Horticulturist and in a series of influential books, borrowing heavily from John Claudius Loudon ( 1783–1843 ), whose ideas he adapted to American conditions. Downing benefited from the villa movement then sweeping the Hudson Valley, and in particular the...

Davis, Andrew Jackson

Davis, Andrew Jackson (1826–1910)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
106 words

...Andrew Jackson ( 1826–1910 ), known as the “Poughkeepsie Seer,” after a shiftless childhood fell under the influence of a mesmerist, who found him to be an ideal subject. In 1845 , with his own hypnotist and reporter, Davis began a series of lectures delivered ostensibly in states of trance. From the verbatim reports he compiled his Principles of Nature, Her Divine Revelations, and A Voice to Mankind ( 1847 ), a mixture of mysticism, philosophy, science, and occult history, which seems to have influenced Poe 's Eureka and Chivers 's Search After...

Downing, Andrew Jackson

Downing, Andrew Jackson (1825–1852)   Reference library

Milton Berman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Andrew Jackson ( 1825–1852 ), landscape architect . Downing was born 31 October 1825 in Newburgh, New York, the son of a nurseryman. At age 16 he went to work in the family business, which he eventually took over. Over the next decades he wrote dozens of articles and four influential books on landscape gardening and on the architecture of country and suburban houses. Downing rejected the Classical-style houses and gardens previously popular and advocated picturesque designs mirroring the Romantic approach prevalent in early nineteenth-century...

Smith, Andrew Jackson

Smith, Andrew Jackson (1815–97)   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...Andrew Jackson ( 1815–97 ) Union army officer , born in Pennsylvania . Smith held several routine postings in the U.S. Army and he served in the Mexican War ( 1846–48 ). When the Civil War broke out, he was in California, where he served briefly before becoming chief of cavalry to Gen. Henry W. Halleck , with whom he served in Mississippi. He also fought with Gen. William T. Sherman in the unsuccessful attack at Chickasaw Bayou and held a command during the Vicksburg campaign ( 1863 ). He accompanied Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks on an ill-fated...

DAVIS, Andrew Jackson

DAVIS, Andrew Jackson (1826–1910)   Reference library

David T. Schmit

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Andrew Jackson ( 1826–1910 ) Spiritualist , author , and editor , Andrew Jackson Davis was born in Blooming Grove in Orange County, New York on 11 August 1826 , and grew up in nearby Hyde Park and Poughkeepsie. In his autobiography, The Magic Staff ( 1859 ), Davis recounts a troubled “backwoods” childhood marred by poverty and poor parental relations. He obtained only a few months of a grade-school education. At age fifteen, he was apprenticed to a shoemaker in Poughkeepsie. In 1843 Davis began practicing the pre-hypnosis trance curative...

Downing, Andrew Jackson

Downing, Andrew Jackson (1815–52)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
260 words

...Andrew Jackson ( 1815–52 ) Leading American writer / landscape-designer of the first half of C19 . His A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening Adapted to North America ( 1841 ) drew on Loudon and Repton , while his Cottage Residences ( 1842 ) and The Architecture of Country Houses ( 1850 ) helped to disseminate his ideas and designs, which owed much to the skills of A.J. Davis (who made professional drawings for Downing’s publications (1839-50)), but, when his proposals to form a partnership with Davis failed, he...

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