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Alfred Harmsworth, Lord Northcliffe

(1865–1922) Britishnewspaper proprietor Born Alfred Harmsworth in Dublin, he founded the Daily Mail (1896), the Daily Mirror (1903), and bought The Times in 1908. His brother, ...

Alfred Harmsworth, Lord Northcliffe

Alfred Harmsworth, Lord Northcliffe (1865–1922)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
91 words

...0Lord Alfred Harmsworth, Lord Northcliffe 1865 – 1922 British newspaper proprietor . On Northcliffe: see anonymous The power of the press is very great, but not so great as the power of suppress. office message, Daily Mail 1918; Reginald Rose and Geoffrey Harmsworth Northcliffe (1959) ch. 22 power of the press power of suppress power of suppress When I want a peerage, I shall buy it like an honest man. Tom Driberg Swaff (1974) ch. 2 When I want a peerage buy it like an honest man buy it like an honest ...

Alfred Harmsworth, Lord Northcliffe

Alfred Harmsworth, Lord Northcliffe  

(1865–1922) Britishnewspaper proprietorBorn Alfred Harmsworth in Dublin, he founded the Daily Mail (1896), the Daily Mirror (1903), and bought The Times in 1908. His brother, Viscount Rothermere ...
Harold Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere

Harold Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere  

(1868–1940).Newspaper proprietor. Younger brother of Alfred Harmsworth, Viscount Northcliffe. Harold Harmsworth accepted Alfred's offer to provide financial management for the publishing venture ...
Magnet

Magnet  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Also published as The Magnet Library (1908–1940), The Magnet was a popular tabloid weekly paper for boys, published by Alfred Harmsworth's Amalgamated Press. This cheap illustrated small paper ...
Times

Times  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Was founded under the name of ‘The Daily Universal Register’ on 1 Jan. 1785 by John Walter, the name being changed to The Times in 1788. It was one of the first papers to employ special foreign ...
Northcliffe, Lord

Northcliffe, Lord (1865–1922)   Reference library

Oxford Reader’s Companion To Conrad

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
266 words

..., Lord Alfred Charles William Harmsworth ( 1865–1922 ), first Baron ( 1905 ), later Viscount ( 1918 ) Northcliffe, a powerful newspaper magnate and pioneer of mass circulation journalism, first met Conrad in 1916 . Having founded the Daily Mail ( 1896 ) and the Daily Mirror ( 1903 ), Northcliffe had by that date also added to his vast empire The Times , whose editorial columns he used to further his political ideals and ambitions. Although Ford Madox Ford stated ( JCPR , 139) that in The Inheritors ( 1901 ) Northcliffe had been...

Northcliffe, Viscount

Northcliffe, Viscount (1865–1922)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Marketing (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
191 words

..., Viscount ( 1865–1922 ) British newspaper proprietor . Born Alfred Harmsworth in Dublin, he founded the Daily Mail ( 1896 ), the Daily Mirror ( 1903 ), and bought The Times in 1908 . His brother, Viscount Rothermere (born Harold Harmsworth) joined him and proved gifted in garnering advertising revenue, which came to be the dominant revenue source of newspapers. Their Amalgamated Press (including Comic Cuts , famously labelled as ‘Amusing Without Being Vulgar’) became one of the world’s largest media empires of its time, with a...

MEE, Arthur (Henry

MEE, Arthur (Henry (1875–1943)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
295 words

...attention of Alfred Harmsworth (later Lord Northcliffe), who began to employ him on the Daily Mail , and in 1905 decided that he should compile The Harmsworth Self-Educator , which was issued in fortnightly parts with great success. It was succeeded by The Harmsworth History of the World , and then in 1908 by The Children’s Encyclopaedia . His other notable venture was The Children’s Newspaper , and his last great labour was The King’s England , a topographical series which occupied the final twelve years of his life. Lord Northcliffe once...

Daily Mail

Daily Mail   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Journalism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
235 words

...hugely popular Mail Online ) published in the UK. Traditionally both conservative and Conservative, the Daily Mail likes to portray itself as speaking for ‘middle England’. The Mail was launched in 1896 by Alfred Harmsworth, later the press baron the first Lord Northcliffe ( 1865–1922 ), and his younger brother Harold, later the first Lord Rothermere ( 1868–1940 ), and it is still owned by their descendants in the guise of Associated Newspapers . When the broadsheet format was abandoned in favour of tabloid in 1971 , the Mail became the...

Williamson, C. N.

Williamson, C. N.   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Edwardian Fiction

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...with a letter (from a journalist cousin and namesake of hers) to Williamson, who introduced her to Alfred Harmsworth, later Lord Northcliffe ( 1865–1922 ), who commissioned a serial, and other editors. Charles Williamson had been educated at London University, his parents wishing him to become an engineer, and though he became a journalist he had enough knowledge of mechanics to be interested in the early motor car. In order to get married she asked Harmsworth to take six serials simultaneously: ‘I can write seven thousand words a day.’ They did not begin to...

penny dreadful

penny dreadful   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
752 words

...schoolmasters, torture, sex (up to a point), and cliché. It was against these that Alfred Harmsworth , later Lord Northcliffe, launched his crusade, with ‘No more penny dreadfuls’ as the slogan of his new Halfpenny Marvel ( see Marvel ) in 1893 . The penny dreadful, said an editorial, ‘makes thieves of the coming generation and so helps fill our jails. If we can rid the world of even one of these vile publications our efforts will not have been in vain.’ The Harmsworth papers claimed never to cast rogues as heroes (a pledge they found impossible to keep...

magazines

magazines   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
1,358 words

...saw that there were gains to be made by publishing ostensibly ‘healthy’ magazines, and Edwin Brett ’s paper The Boys of England began as a penny weekly in 1866 . The first Jack Harkaway story appeared in it. In the last decade of the 19th cent. Alfred Harmsworth (later Lord Northcliffe) launched his campaign ‘No More Penny Dreadfuls’ by issuing the even cheaper Marvel , and his Union Jack and Pluck established a new pattern for a boy’s magazine of huge circulation. Captain , founded in 1899 and published by Newnes, was also very...

Magazines

Magazines   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
2,604 words
Illustration(s):
1

...in Britain. Its success prompted a host of imitations: other publishing magnates, such as C. Arthur Pearson and Alfred Harmsworth (later Lord Northcliffe), achieved their initial successes with similar papers, Pearson's Weekly ( 1890 ) and Answers to Correspondents ( 1888 ). Advertising was used to a degree not seen before as magazines were marketed like any consumer product. Publicity gimmicks and superlatives were common. Harmsworth's achievements in magazine journalism stand beside his landmark newspaper foundations, Daily Mail ( 1896 ) and Daily...

Inheritors: An Extravagant Story, The

Inheritors: An Extravagant Story, The   Reference library

Oxford Reader’s Companion To Conrad

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,100 words

...in 1898 at the cost of thousands of lives. The Conservative leader (and future Prime Minister) Arthur Balfour is represented by Churchill, who invites the narrator to collaborate with him on a biography of Oliver Cromwell. Fox is based on the newspaper baron Alfred Harmsworth (later Lord Northcliffe ), the villainous Gurnard on Joseph Chamberlain , Lea on Edward Garnett , Jenkins on Ford’s grandfather Ford Madox Brown , and Polehampton on Conrad’s first English publisher, T. Fisher Unwin . Conrad found some amusement in the attempts of readers to...

Tabloid Journalism and Tabloidization

Tabloid Journalism and Tabloidization   Reference library

Sofia Johansson

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Journalism Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
9,967 words

...century , when Anglo-Irish newspaper proprietor Alfred Harmsworth (later Lord Northcliffe) publicly stated his vision of a “condensed,” “tabloid” newspaper. For Harmsworth, tabloid did not denote the shape of the newspaper but concerned brevity in style and content—a form of journalism where stories, paragraphs, and sentences were to be kept as short as possible ( Bingham & Conboy, 2015 ; Tulloch, 2000 ). A contemporary of American newspaper magnates Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst, Harmsworth had in 1896 launched the Daily Mail , which, set...

Children's Newspaper, The

Children's Newspaper, The   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Newspaper, The . A newspaper for children published from 22 March 1919 until 1 May 1965 and edited by Arthur Mee ( 1875–1943 ) until his death. Mee was also editor of The Children's Encyclopaedia , also published by Alfred Harmsworth 's (Lord Northcliffe's) Amalgamated Press. Like The Children's Encyclopaedia, The Children's Newspaper concentrated on stories of heroism and individual achievement and also featured serial stories, photo pages and...

Northcliffe

Northcliffe   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
51 words

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