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Aleksandr Pushkin

(b Mikulino, 7 Sept. 1907; d Leningrad, 20 Mar. 1970) Soviet dancer and teacher. His early training was with Nikolai Legat. He studied at the Leningrad Ballet School, with ...

Pushkin, Aleksandr

Pushkin, Aleksandr (7 September 1907)   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
534 words

..., Aleksandr ( Aleksandr Ivanovich Pushkin ; born 7 September 1907 in Mikulino, Russia, died 20 March 1970 in Leningrad), dancer and teacher. Pushkin studied at the School of Russian Ballet under Akim Volynsky , Nadezhda Nikolaeva , and Aleksandr Chekrygin ; Nikolai Legat occasionally attended lessons. In the summers Pushkin was trained by Agrippina Vaganova . In March 1923 he was admitted to the Leningrad Choreographic Institute, where he studied in Vladimir Ponomarev 's class for two years. In 1925 Pushkin and Marina Semenova danced the...

Pushkin, Aleksandr

Pushkin, Aleksandr   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
275 words

..., Aleksandr ( 1799–1837 ) Russia 's greatest poet , one of its greatest prose writers; on the basis of a single play, its greatest tragedian. After an early attempt at a *tragedy , Pushkin turned to the ‘time of troubles’ at the turn of the seventeenth century. The play which resulted, Boris Godunov ( 1825 ), written in Shakespearian blank verse, as opposed to alexandrines, is episodic rather than *neoclassical in form, ignores the *unities , and moves freely between Russia and Poland, from a palace to an inn, from moonlit garden to palace square....

Pushkin, Aleksandr

Pushkin, Aleksandr (7 Sept. 1907)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Dance (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
111 words

...Pushkin, Aleksandr ( b Mikulino , 7 Sept. 1907 ; d Leningrad , 20 Mar. 1970 ) Soviet dancer and teacher . His early training was with Nikolai Legat . He studied at the Leningrad Ballet School, with Ponomarev and others and graduated in 1925 into the Mariinsky company, then known as GATOB, later the Kirov. He danced there until 1953 , creating roles in Vainonen's The Flames of Paris ( 1932 ) and Zakharov's Lost Illusions ( 1936 ). He began teaching in 1932 , and when he retired he took over the school's Class of Perfection. As a teacher he...

Pushkin, Aleksandr

Pushkin, Aleksandr   Reference library

Nick Worrall

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
507 words

..., Aleksandr ( 1799–1837 ) Russian writer, the country's greatest poet and one of its greatest prose writers. He is also, ironically, and on the basis of a single play, its greatest tragedian. Not only did his poetry, prose, and drama constitute a complete break with pre-existing Russian models—formal, sentimental, and neoclassical —but he broke entirely new ground in each genre and single-handedly invented a new language for Russian literature which became a model for generations to come. Pushkin had become interested in the theatre whilst at school...

Aleksandr Pushkin

Aleksandr Pushkin (17991837)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
145 words

...Aleksandr Pushkin 1799 1837 Russian poet and novelist I loved you and it may be that my love within my soul has not yet altogether died away; howbeit, it will not trouble you any more, I do not wish to sadden you in any way. I loved you in silence and without hope, worn out now with jealousy and now with shamefastedness; I loved you so truly and so tenderly as may God grant you may be loved by some other one. Poem, ‘I Loved You’ (1829). As featured in Maurice Baring's introduction to The Oxford Book of Russian Verse (1925). Of this short poem, Baring...

Pushkin, Aleksandr Sergeevich

Pushkin, Aleksandr Sergeevich (1799–1837)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
144 words

..., Aleksandr Sergeevich ( 1799–1837 ) Russian poet . Pushkin was a prolific writer in a wide variety of genres, but he owed his initial popularity to his early narrative poems, including Ruslan and Ludmilla ( 1820 ), and the so‐called southern or Byronic poems , The Prisoner of the Caucasus ( 1820–21 ), The Fountain of Bakhchisarai ( 1822 ), and The Gypsies ( 1824 ); The Bronze Horseman ( 1833 ) is set during the great flood of 1824 . Pushkin’s novel in verse Eugene Onegin ( 1823–31 ) has been much translated into English, from Colonel...

Pushkin, Aleksandr Sergeevich

Pushkin, Aleksandr Sergeevich (1799–1837)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
503 words

...Scott , and William Wordsworth . First mentioned in the English press in 1821 , Pushkin found his first translator in George Borrow ( The Talisman: From the Russian of Alexander Pushkin, With Other Pieces , St Petersburg, 1835 ) and an early champion and translator in Thomas Budge Shaw ( Blackwood's , 1845 ). Every line that Pushkin wrote is now available in English in The Complete Works of Alexander Pushkin (15 vols, 1999–2003 ). See also T. J. Binyon , Pushkin ...

Pushkin, Alexander

Pushkin, Alexander (1799–1837)   Reference library

Maria Nikolajeva

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature
Length:
367 words

...tales were not primarily addressed to children, they have been widely used in schoolbook texts, thus becoming a notable part of the national heritage. The significance of Pushkin for the Russian fairy-tale tradition cannot be overestimated. Maria Nikolajeva Debreczeny, Paul , The Other Pushkin: A Study of Alexander Pushkin’s Prose Fiction (1983). Edmunds, Catherine J. , ‘Pushkin and Gogol as Sources for the Librettos of the Fantastic Fairy Tale Operas of Rimskij-Korsakov’ (Diss., Harvard University, 1985). Eimermacher, Karl , ‘Aspekte des literarischen...

Pushkin, Alexander

Pushkin, Alexander (1799–1837)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
353 words

...tales were not primarily addressed to children, they have been widely used in schoolbook texts, thus becoming a notable part of the national heritage. The significance of Pushkin for the Russian fairy-tale tradition cannot be overestimated. MN Maria Nikolajeva Debreczeny, Paul , The Other Pushkin: A Study of Alexander Pushkin's Prose Fiction (1983). Edmunds, Catherine J. , ‘Pushkin and Gogol as Sources for the Librettos of the Fantastic Fairy Tale Operas of Rimskij-Korsakov’ (Diss., Harvard University, 1985). Eimermacher, Karl , ‘Aspekte des...

Pushkin, Alexander

Pushkin, Alexander   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
359 words

..., Alexander ( 1799–1837 ), Russian national poet, also considered a major children's writer because of his fairy tales, which have been widely used in juvenile reading even though they were not specifically written for a young audience. Easily recognizable in plots, Pushkin's verse fairy tales are highly original in style and details. The Tale of Tsar Saltan ( 1831 ), based on a popular Slavic chapbook, is reminiscent of “The Girl Without Hands,” and The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Heroes ( 1833 ) is a rather unusual version of “Snow...

Alexander Pushkin

Alexander Pushkin (1799–1837)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
72 words

...0Alexander Alexander Pushkin 1799 – 1837 Russian poet A tedious season they await Who hear November at the gate. Eugene Onegin (1833) ch. 4, st. 40 (tr. B. Deutsch) Moscow: those syllables can start A tumult in the Russian heart. Eugene Onegin (1833) ch. 7, st. 36 (tr. B. Deutsch) Moscow : those syllables tumult in the Russian heart A deception that elevates us is dearer than a host of low truths. ‘Hero’...

Alexander Pushkin

Alexander Pushkin (1799–1837)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
293 words

...0Alexander Alexander Pushkin 1799 – 1837 Russian poet Storm-clouds whirl and storm-clouds scurry; From behind them pale moonlight Flickers where the snowflakes hurry. Dark the sky and dark the night. ‘Devils’ (1830) (translated by C. M. Bowra) storm -clouds whirl snowflakes hurry dark the sky From early youth his dedication Was to a single occupation… The science of the tender passion. Eugene Onegin (1833) ch. 1, st. 8 (translated by Babette Deutsch) science of the tender passion of the tender passion A woman's love for us increases The less we...

Pushkin, Alexander Sergeyevich

Pushkin, Alexander Sergeyevich (1799–1837)   Reference library

Tom Matheson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

..., Alexander Sergeyevich ( 1799–1837 ), national poet of Russia . In 1605 an anonymous writer compared Hamlet to events at the court of the Russian Tsar Boris Godunov. In 1825 Pushkin based his tragedy Boris Godunov on the popular Shakespearian model, preferring it to French classical exemplars. Pushkin deliberately turned to Shakespeare from Byron , reading the works in Letourneur ’s 1821 French translation, and studying, at the same time, A. W. Schlegel on dramatic art. In an 1830 draft preface to Godunov he confessed, ‘I imitated...

Pushkin, Alexander Sergeievich

Pushkin, Alexander Sergeievich (1799–1837)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
98 words

..., Alexander Sergeievich ( 1799–1837 ) Russian poet and novelist . He was exiled for his political beliefs in 1820 , the year in which his folk poem Ruslan and Lyudmila published. The Prisoner of the Caucasus ( 1822 ) is his response to the beauty of the Crimea and the Caucasus; and the tragedy Boris Godunov ( 1826 ) reveals the influence of Byron . Pushkin's masterpiece was the verse novel Eugene Onegin ( 1833 ). Other works include the short story The Queen of Spades ( 1834 ) and the historical novel The Captain's Daughter ( 1836 )....

PUSHKIN, Alexander Sergeyevich

PUSHKIN, Alexander Sergeyevich (1799–1837)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
130 words

...PUSHKIN, Alexander Sergeyevich ( 1799–1837 ) Celebrated Russian poet who made narrative poems of a number of his country’s folk tales or Skazki , all of them written during the 1830s. The Golden Cockerel , for example, is the story of a magic bird given to a fat and lazy king by a wicked sorcerer; it was made into an opera by Rimsky-Korsakov ( 1909 ), was used as the basis of a picture book by Willy Pogány ( 1936 ), and has been translated by James Reeves ( 1969 ). The Fisherman and the Fish , also known as The Golden Fish , tells how a fisherman...

Pushkin, Alexander Sergeivich

Pushkin, Alexander Sergeivich   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
291 words

..., Alexander Sergeivich ( 1799–1837 ), Russian poet, who at the age of 8 reputedly wrote little plays in French, which he acted with his sister. It is evident from his letters and other sources that Pushkin contemplated writing a series of dramatic works of which his great drama Boris Godunov alone was completed. It is notable as being the first Russian tragedy on a political theme—the relationship between a tyrant and his people—which, though set back in time, was actually a burning contemporary problem; and it does not rely on a love-intrigue. In other...

Pushkin, Alexander [Sergeevich]

Pushkin, Alexander [Sergeevich] (1799–1837)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Writers and their Works (3 ed.)

..., Alexander [Sergeevich] ( 1799–1837 ) Russian poet , dramatist , and short-story writer Ruslan and Ludmilla ( 1820 ) Poetry The Prisoner of the Caucasus ( 1820–1 ) Poetry The Fountain of Bakhchisarai ( 1822 ) Poetry Eugene Onegin ( 1823–31 ) Poetry The Gypsies ( 1824 ) Poetry Boris Godunov ( 1825 ) Drama Count Nulin ( 1825 ) Poetry Poltava ( 1829 ) Poetry The Little House in Kolomna ( 1830 ) Poetry The Tales of Belkin ( 1830 ) Fiction Short Stories The Bronze Horseman ( 1833 ) Poetry The Queen of Spades ( 1834 ) Fiction...

Pushkin, Aleksandr

Pushkin, Aleksandr   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
52 words
Pushkin, Aleksandr

Pushkin, Aleksandr   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
65 words
Pushkin, Aleksandr

Pushkin, Aleksandr   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
63 words

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