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Aleuadae

Princely family of Larissa in Thessaly. The military and political organization of the federal Thessalian state goes back to Aleuas the Red (second half of the 6th cent. bc). The ...

Aleuadae

Aleuadae   Reference library

Bruno Helly

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
133 words

... , aristocratic family of Larissa in Thessaly . The military and political organization of the federal Thessalian state goes back to Aleuas the Red (second half of the 6th cent. bc ). The Aleuad Thorax and his brothers instigated Thessalian Medism , but paid the price in lost influence after the Persian Wars . In the 4th cent. the family opposed the tyrants of Pherae and invited the Macedonian kings (fellow-Heraclids) to intervene in Thessaly. An Aleuad rebelled against Philip (1) II of Macedon; thereafter the family disappears from Thessalian...

Aleuadae

Aleuadae  

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Overview Page
Princely family of Larissa in Thessaly. The military and political organization of the federal Thessalian state goes back to Aleuas the Red (second half of the 6th cent. bc). The ...
Thessaliotis

Thessaliotis  

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Overview Page
One of the four tetrades (districts) of Thessaly, organized by Aleuas the Red in the 6th cent. bc (see Aleuadae), and located in the southern half of the east Thessalian ...
Hestiaeotis

Hestiaeotis  

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Overview Page
The most westerly of the four tetrades (districts) of Thessaly. Its extent was defined by Aleuas the Red c. 550–500 bc (see Aleuadae): it incorporated the four cities of Tricca ...
Alexander (2) II

Alexander (2) II   Reference library

Albert Brian Bosworth

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
86 words

...(2) II , eldest son of Amyntas (1) III and Eurydice, and king of Macedon 370–368 bc . His short and turbulent reign was bedevilled by rivalry and open war with his brother-in-law, Ptolemy of Alorus. An intervention in Thessaly in support of the Aleuadae of Larissa ( 369 ) ended ingloriously when his garrisons were ejected by Pelopidas and he himself was forced into alliance with Thebes ( 1 ) . Shortly afterwards he was murdered at Ptolemy's instigation. Albert Brian...

Crannon

Crannon   Reference library

Bruno Helly

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
115 words

..., city occupying a depression in the middle of the hills between the east and west plains of Thessaly . Occupied early on by the Thessalians, the city was governed by an aristocratic family, the Scopadae, rivals of the Aleuadae . Around 515 bc the collapse of their palace, killing several family members, terminated their influence. The small extent of its territory and the proximity of Larissa stunted the city's subsequent development. In the 4th cent. Dinias of Pherae became tyrant with the support of his home-city. In the Lamian War Antipater...

Hestiaeotis

Hestiaeotis   Reference library

Bruno Helly

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
178 words

..., the most westerly of the four tetrades (districts) of Thessaly . Its extent was defined by Aleuas the Red c. 550–500 bc ( see aleuadae ): it incorporated the four cities of Tricca, Pharcadum, Pelinna, and Gomphi. Later it came to include the cities gradually occupied by the ‘Thessalians who live below Mt. Pindus’ (Strabo): Phaeca, Ligynae, and Aeginium (mod. Kalambaka), the capital of Tymphaea. In the 4th cent. bc a new city, Metropolis, appeared in the SW part of the eastern plain, created by the synoecism of various minor settlements,...

The'ssaly

The'ssaly   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
196 words

...Pherae. Thessaly was powerful in the seventh century bc , during which time the Thessalians organized themselves into a state with cities ruled by aristocratic families but in a federation under one ruler. From 400 bc Thessaly declined because of inter-city rivalries (the Aleuadae and the Scopadae were rival clans). In the early fourth century it was briefly united under Jason of Pherae , but late in that century came under Macedonian control. Ostensibly liberated by Rome in 196 ( see Flamininus ), it was incorporated into the Roman province of...

Larissa

Larissa   Reference library

Bruno Helly

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
210 words

...and grandfather of Perseus (1) , it took its name from the nymph Larissa, depicted on civic coins of the 4th cent. bc , mother of Pelasgus, Achaeus, and Phthius, eponymous heroes of the local population. Its history, little-known for the earliest period, is linked with the Aleuadae , who ruled the city from the beginning of the 6th to the end of the 4th cent. bc . Developing rapidly, Larissa dominated the cities of Pelasgiotis , becoming the leading power of Thessaly. Around 400 domestic strife between oligarchic factions weakened it to the profit of ...

Phthiotis

Phthiotis   Reference library

Bruno Helly

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
253 words

...Othrys foothills, and to the east by the hills which, from the Revenia to the Othrys range, dominate the plain of Halmyrus, the E. part of Achaea. To the west the border with Hestiaeotis passed through the plain of Karditsa. In the 6th cent. bc , when Aleuas the Red ( see aleuadae ) introduced the division into tetrads, Phthiotis comprised four cities: Pharsalus , Euhydrium, Phyllus, and Pirasia. They incorporated villages ( komai ): for Pharsalus the sources mention Palaeopharsalus, as well as a sanctuary, Thetideum, near the site of the two battles of...

Thessaliotis

Thessaliotis   Reference library

Bruno Helly

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
253 words

..., one of the four tetrades (districts) of Thessaly , organized by Aleuas the Red in the 6th cent. bc ( see aleuadae ), and located in the southern half of the west Thessalian plain (region at the east of mod. Karditsa) on the fertile terraces stretching between the foothills of Mt. Pindus and the river Peneus. The local post Mycenean population of pastoralists and peasant-farmers was submitted by an intrusive group coming from the mountain of Pindos, self-called Thessaloi , which gradually acquired a distinctive identity marked by Greek...

Thessaly

Thessaly   Reference library

Bruno Helly

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
998 words

... bc the Thessalian state was reorganized by Aleuas the Red ( see aleuadae ), who created the four tetrads, each of four cities; the federal chief now received the title of tetrarch ( see tetrarchy ). Aleuas adapted the territories of each city for military mobilization by creating land-allotments ( klēroi ) controlled by the tagoi , officials charged with organizing the state's military units, and thus created an effective army. See also crannon (for the Scopadae, rivals of the Aleuadae). In the 5th cent. bc the Thessalians strengthened their hold on...

tagos

tagos   Reference library

Bruno Helly

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
285 words

...in order to extend his domination of the region and prop up his foreign policy. All other texts present these chiefs as ἀρχός, ἄρχων, or τέτραρχος ( archos , archōn , or tetrarchos ); as distinct from the title basileus , used by the aristocratic families, e.g. the Aleuadae . Contrary to the traditional view, two inscriptions from the late 6th and the 5th cents. bc set the tagoi among other civic magistrates: here they are not eponymous, and their duties concern mobilization and the military function of the citizens; their activities belong to...

Simonides

Simonides   Quick reference

P. J. Parsons

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
591 words

...the epitaph for the seer Megistias (vi Page) may be genuine (cf. Hdt. 7. 228. 4). Simonides' clients included cities, individual athletes like Eualcidas and Astylus of Croton (fr. 506 ), tyrants like Anaxilas of Rhegium (fr. 515 ), and various Thessalian dynasts, e.g. the Aleuadae and the Scopadae (Theoc. 16. 42–7). Xenocrates of Acragas (fr. 513 ) and the Corinthian Oligaethidae (fr. 519A , 21+22) commissioned poems from him, and also from Pindar ( Isthm . 2, Pyth . 6; Ol . 13). Tradition connected him with Themistocles and Pausanias ; poetic...

Simonides

Simonides   Reference library

P. J. Parsons

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
626 words

...name; the epitaph for the seer Megistias (vi Page) may be genuine (cf. Hdt. 7. 228. 4). Simonides’ clients included cities, individual athletes like Eualcidas and Astylus of Croton (fr. 506), tyrants like Anaxilas of Rhegium (fr. 515), and various Thessalian dynasts, e.g. the Aleuadae and the Scopadae (Theoc 16. 42–7). Xenocrates of Acragas (fr. 513) and the Corinthian Oligaethidae (fr. 519A, 21+22) commissioned poems from him, and also from Pindar ( Isthm . 2, Pyth . 6; Ol . 13). Tradition connected him with Themistocles and the regent Pausanias of...

Simonides

Simonides   Reference library

P. J. Parsons

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
710 words

...the epitaph for the seer Megistias (vi Page) may be genuine (cf. Hdt. 7. 228. 4). Simonides' clients included cities, individual athletes like Eualcidas and Astylus of Croton (fr. 506), tyrants like Anaxilas of Rhegium (fr. 515), and various Thessalian dynasts, e.g. the Aleuadae and the Scopadae, for whom see crannon (Theoc 16. 42–7). Xenocrates of Acragas (fr. 513) and the Corinthian Oligaethidae (fr. 519A, 21+22; see Corinth ) commissioned poems from him, and also from Pindar ( Isthm. 2, Pyth. 6; Ol. 13). Tradition connected him with ...

Thessaly

Thessaly   Reference library

Bruno Helly

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
897 words

...and wealth accumulated; aristocratic families engaged in their rivalries, but also were forced to cede to political pressure from ordinary citizens seeking a say in local government, which became progressively more democratic. Inter-city rivalries worsened c. 400 bc . The Aleuadae of Larissa directly opposed the tyrant Lycophron of Pherae with the help of the kings of Macedon, to whom they thereby gave the means of intervening in Thessaly. Lycophron’s successor, Jason , sought to become master of all Thessaly, using the federal army; after initiating an...

Thessaly

Thessaly   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,788 words

...Thessaly's power and led Aleuas the Red (leader of the Aleuadae family controlling the city of Larissa) to reorganize Thessaly into the tetrads under a new federal chief official (tetrarch). To build a strong army, he assigned plots of land to be controlled by military leaders ( tagoi ; sing., tagos ). The Thessalian aristocrats did not favor democracy; they allied themselves with the tyrant family of Athens, the Pisistratids, in the later sixth century bce . In the early fifth century bce , the Aleuadae pledged loyalty to the Persian king Xerxes when...

Philip II

Philip II   Quick reference

Albert Brian Bosworth

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,081 words

...of the neighbouring gold mines allegedly engrossed 1,000 talents per annum , which enabled him to maintain a large mercenary army and win the services of politicians in southern Greece. Thessaly rapidly became an annexe of Macedon. An early marriage alliance with the Aleuadae family of Larissa brought an invitation to intervene in the murderous internecine war between the Thessalian League and the tyrants of Pherae. Initial defeats in 353 were redeemed in 352 by the great victory of the Crocus Field and the expulsion of Lycophron and Peitholaus...

federal states

federal states   Reference library

Jakob Aall Ottesen Larsen and P. J. Rhodes

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,024 words

...the 5th cent. cities developed, and became more important than the tetrads. At the end of the century a dynasty of tyrants came to power in Pherae; c. 375 Jason of Pherae aspired to rule all Thessaly, with the title of tagos ; in the 360s the opponents of Pherae, led by the Aleuadae family of Larissa , organized themselves in a koinon with an archōn (‘ruler’) and four polemarchs (‘war-rulers’); appeals for support to Macedon and to Thebes culminated in the overthrow of the tyrants by Philip II of Macdeon in 352 and his being made archōn of...

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