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Aldwych Theatre

Chekhov might have enjoyed the irony: the London theatre that saw the first production in England of The Cherry Orchard (in 1911, six years after the 1,100-seater opened) became best ... ...

Aldwych Theatre

Aldwych Theatre   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
130 words

... Theatre Chekhov might have enjoyed the irony: the London theatre that saw the first production in England of The Cherry Orchard (in 1911 , six years after the 1,100-seater opened) became best known for giving its name to the Aldwych farces , a series of hits mostly by Ben Travers that ran from 1922 to 1933 . It remained a conventional West End theatre except for the years 1960–82 when the Royal Shakespeare Company made the Aldwych its London home and staged many outstanding productions there. Alongside transfers from Stratford-upon-Avon ,...

Aldwych Theatre

Aldwych Theatre   Reference library

Victor Emeljanow

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
161 words

... Theatre London playhouse at the eastern end of the Strand, built in 1905 for Seymour Hicks and Charles Frohman . Though it saw the first English productions of Chekhov 's The Cherry Orchard ( 1911 ) and Williams 's A Streetcar Named Desire ( 1949 ), its history has been undistinguished except for two periods. Between 1924 and 1932 it housed the seasons of farces mostly written by Ben Travers and starring Tom Walls , Ralph Lynn , and J. Robertson Hare , collectively known as the Aldwych farces. From 1960 to 1982 it became the...

Aldwych Theatre

Aldwych Theatre   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
448 words

... Theatre , London, three-tier theatre seating 1,100, was built for Seymour Hicks , who opened it in 1905 with himself and his wife Ellaline Terriss in a revival of their ‘dream fantasy’ Bluebell in Fairyland . The building was damaged during the First World War, but after restoration reopened and in 1923 had its first outstanding success with Tons of Money , a farce by Will Evans and Valentine . In the cast were Ralph Lynn and Tom Walls , and both actors stayed on to appear with Robertson Hare in a succession of ‘Aldwych farces’ written by...

Aldwych Theatre

Aldwych Theatre  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Chekhov might have enjoyed the irony: the London theatre that saw the first production in England of The Cherry Orchard (in 1911, six years after the 1,100-seater opened) became best ...
Aldwych farces

Aldwych farces  

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Overview Page
Long-running series of 13 farces staged at London's Aldwych Theatre (1922–33). Ben Travers provided nine consecutive successes between 1925 and 1933, including A Cuckoo in the Nest, Rookery Nook, ...
World Theatre Season

World Theatre Season  

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Overview Page
Annual festival of foreign plays in the original, performed by foreign companies invited to London by Peter Daubeny and housed in the Aldwych Theatre during the absence of the RSC. ...
Tom Walls

Tom Walls  

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(1883–1949),English actor, director, and theatre manager. He first appeared on the stage in Glasgow in 1905, and subsequently toured in the United States and Canada, returning to London in ...
Will Evans

Will Evans  

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(b. London, 29 May 1873; d. London, 11 April 1931)music hall and pantomime performer who made his debut, aged six, with his father's theatre troupe and toured with them ...
West End

West End  

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London's commercial theatre district: an area bounded by Soho, Aldwych, Piccadilly and Westminster to the west (hence its name) of the city. When Sir Squire and Lady Bancroft bought a ...
J. Robertson Hare

J. Robertson Hare  

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Overview Page
(1891–1979),English comedian and a consummate player of farce, who made his first appearance on the stage in 1911 in Carton's The Bear Leaders, and spent many years touring in ...
Duchess Theatre

Duchess Theatre  

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London, in Catherine Street, off the Aldwych. This small theatre, seating 491 in two tiers, with a proscenium opening of 25 ft., opened in 1929 and housed some early productions ...
Strand Theatre

Strand Theatre  

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I London. I. In the Strand. It opened in 1832 as Rayner's New Strand Subscription Theatre. The last battles between the unlicensed houses and the Patent Theatres were being waged ...
ancient Greek drama in the twentieth century

ancient Greek drama in the twentieth century  

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Overview Page
In Britain and the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century, classical theatre meant almost exclusively the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. In his projected renewal of ...
Brian Rix

Brian Rix  

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(1924– )English actor and manager, who began his career in 1942 and was for a while a member of Donald Wolfit's company during its London wartime seasons. He made his ...
Rookery Nook

Rookery Nook  

A: Ben Travers Pf: 1926, Southsea Pb: 1930 G: Farce in 3 acts S: English seaside cottage, Somerset, 1920s C: 5m, 6fThe formidable Gertrude Twine has rented a charming country cottage, Rookery Nook, ...
Michael Codron

Michael Codron  

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(1930– )British producer with a reputation built on supporting the work of new writers in the 1960s. In 1958 he produced plays by John Mortimer and Harold Pinter, while later ...
Roy Dotrice

Roy Dotrice  

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(b. Guernsey, 26 May 1925)Actor and director. He worked with various repertory theatres before founding the Guernsey Repertory Theatre in 1955. In 1958 he joined the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre ...
Shaftesbury Theatre

Shaftesbury Theatre  

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Built in 1911 by Bertie Crewe for Walter and Frederick Melville in London, it was originally the New Prince's Theatre (capacity 1,250), became the Prince's Theatre in 1914, and the ...
Michel Saint-Denis

Michel Saint-Denis  

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(1897–1971)French actor, director, and teacher. Nephew and student of Copeau, Saint-Denis later headed the Compagnie des Quinze, for which he directed several noteworthy productions at the Théâtre du ...
Michael Rudman

Michael Rudman  

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(1939– )American director in Britain. From the mid-1960s to the 1970s, he worked in regional repertory theatres, and was artistic director of the Hampstead Theatre Club until 1979. Subsequently he ...

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