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Alabados And Alabanzas

Alabados, also called alabanzas, are religious hymns found in Mexico and the U.S. Southwest. Juan B. Rael describes alabados as ballads that turn into prayers. In New Mexico the ...

Alabados And Alabanzas

Alabados And Alabanzas   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,163 words

... And Alabanzas . Alabados , also called alabanzas , are religious hymns found in Mexico and the U.S. Southwest. Juan B. Rael describes alabados as ballads that turn into prayers. In New Mexico the hymns are closely associated with the Hermandad de Nuestro Padre Jesús Nazareno (Brotherhood of Our Father Jesus Nazarene), a Hispano/a Catholic organization native to this area of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The first collection of alabados outside the brotherhood was published in 1877 by Father Raillere. The hermanos (brothers) are commonly known as...

Alabados And Alabanzas

Alabados And Alabanzas  

Alabados, also called alabanzas, are religious hymns found in Mexico and the U.S. Southwest. Juan B. Rael describes alabados as ballads that turn into prayers.In New Mexico the hymns ...
Alabado/alabanza (Spanish-American: “praise”)

Alabado/alabanza (Spanish-American: “praise”)   Reference library

John Koegel

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
718 words

...editions in New Mexico and Texas between 1884 and 1956 (nine text-only editions and three editions with music). Cánticos espirituales grew from 94 devotional songs in the first edition of 1884 to include 305 songs in the last edition of 1956 . Later collectors of alabados and alabanzas include Juan B. Rael, Vicente T. Mendoza, John Donald Robb, Rubén Cobos, and Thomas J. Steele; all published studies of the genre. Alabado and alabanza music and texts are at the University of New Mexico (John Donald Robb Collection and personal cancioneros ...

Yaqui

Yaqui   Reference library

J. Richard Haefer

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
1,085 words

..., dramatize the last days of Christ's life; the Matachines preside during the happier, more relaxed summer and autumn seasons. Music associated with the Lenten season includes the singing of alabanzas and alabados (hymns of praise) by Catholic women, who also chant prayers of the Church in Spanish, Latin, or Yaqui. The matachines , aligned in three rows, perform a dance resembling a contradance to the accompaniment of fiddle ( lave’leo ) and guitar ( quitar ). Each dancer holds a gourd rattle ( aiyam ) painted red, which is shaken at specific points in...

Southwest

Southwest   Reference library

J. Richard Haefer

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
2,732 words

...for Linguistics has been responsible for translating Protestant hymns and Christmas carols into many native languages. 2. Vernacular musics. (i) Hispanic traditions. European vernacular music first entered the Southwest with the coming of Spanish Catholic missionaries. By the 18th century Gregorian chant, villancicos , and vernacular hymns were used to teach the faith to the indigenous population. Especially popular were alabanzas and alabados that are still sung today by both Native and Hispanic cultures along with various Catholic prayers such as the...

Roman Catholic Church

Roman Catholic Church   Reference library

John Koegel, William Summers, Margaret Cayward, John Koegel, John Koegel, John Grady, John Koegel, and John Koegel

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
12,672 words

...singing of hymns and other spiritual songs in languages other than English continued throughout the 19th (and into the 21st) century, such as German, Polish, Spanish, French, and other languages. A large body of Spanish-language devotional and penitential songs developed in New Mexico from at least the 19th century with the Alabanza and Alabado , songs of praise and penitence for the sacraments, including the Eucharist, as well as the Passion narrative, the Blessed Virgin Mary, and the saints. The melismatic, unaccompanied New Mexican alabado, frequently in...

Latino music.

Latino music.   Reference library

Michael Birenbaum Quintero, Jason Stanyek, Melissa Gonzalez, Jorge Arevalo MATEUS, Mario Rey, Sydney Hutchinson, Lois Wilcken, Roberto Avant-Mier, John Koegel, and Edgardo Díaz Díaz

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
14,076 words
Illustration(s):
2

...musicians performing traditional sacred and secular music from New Mexico— canciones , corridos (narrative strophic ballads), romances, alabados, alabanzas, and other forms—including Próspero Baca , Francisco S. Leyva , and Edwin Berry . (These recordings are held by the University of New Mexico.) Numerous Mexican American and Mexican professional musicians have been active in performing the art music, salon or parlor, and operatic repertory in the Southwest and throughout the United States since the 1850s, and in recent decades the number has been much...

Music

Music   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
15,943 words
Illustration(s):
4

...psychedelic rock at first and Música Progresiva Boliviana (with El Inca) later on. Colombia, Ecuador, and Venezuela. Colombia's geographic location makes it particularly likely to receive African and Spanish influences as well as those of its indigenous populations. The popular genres begin with the romance and end with the copla , the alabado , the arrullos , the bunde from the western coast, and the zafra and vaquería from the north. The “national dance” is the Andean bambuco (along with its variants, the sanjuanero and rajaleña ), in which the...

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