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Agathon

Of Athens was the most celebrated tragic poet after the three great masters. (See tragedy, greek.) He won his first victory in 416 bc, and the occasion of Plato's Symposium is a party at ...

Agathon

Agathon   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
9 words

... , pseudonym used by Henri Massis for co‐authored...

agathon

agathon   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
49 words

... (Greek, the good) In Aristotle , a life that involves the exercise of the highest faculties, fulfilling a person’s telos or end. In other philosophies the good is identified with pleasure, or virtue, or the absence of desire, or conformity to duty. See also ethics , eudaimonia , summum bonum...

Agathon

Agathon   Reference library

Judith Mossman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
60 words

... ( c. 450– c. 399 bc ) Athenian tragedian. His elaborately antithetical style (influenced by the sophist Gorgias) and his self-conscious poetic persona were parodied by Aristophanes and Plato . The first tragedian to compose a play with fictional rather than mythological characters (the Antheus ), he also introduced the chromatic scale to his musical scores for tragedy . Judith...

Agathon

Agathon   Quick reference

Andrew L. Brown

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
383 words

... , son of Tisamenus of Athens, was the most celebrated tragic poet after the three great masters, Aeschylus , Sophocles , and Euripides . He won his first victory at the Lenaea (a festival sacred to Dionysus) in 416 bc , and the occasion of Plato 's Symposium is a party at his house in celebration of that victory. Plato emphasizes his youth in the Symposium and portrays him as a boy in the Protagoras (315d), of which the dramatic date is about 430 , so he must have been born after 450 . In the Protagoras he is seen in the company of the...

Agathon

Agathon   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
241 words

... of Athens was the most celebrated tragic poet after the three great masters. ( See tragedy, greek .) He won his first victory in 416 bc , and the occasion of Plato 's Symposium is a party at his house in celebration of that victory. Plato emphasizes his youth in Symposium and portrays him as a boy in Protagoras , of which the dramatic date is c. 430 ; so he must have been born after 450 . In Protagoras he is seen in the company of the Prodicus , and he appears to have been influenced in style by Gorgias . In 411 he heard and approved ...

Agathon

Agathon   Reference library

Andrew L. Brown

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
432 words

... , son of Tisamenus of Athens, was the most celebrated tragic poet after the three great masters. ( See tragedy, greek .) He won his first victory at the Lenaea in 416 bc , and the occasion of Plato (1) 's Symposium is a party at his house in celebration of that victory. Plato emphasizes his youth in the Symposium and portrays him as a boy in the Protagoras (315d), of which the dramatic date is about 430 , so he must have been born after 450 . In the Protagoras he is seen in the company of the sophist Prodicus , and he appears to have...

Agathon

Agathon (b. c.445 bc)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
48 words

... Agathon b. c. 445 bc Greek tragic poet Even a god cannot change the past. literally, ‘The one thing which even God cannot do is to make undone what has been done’ Aristotle Nicomachaean Ethics bk. 6 God cannot change the past change the past change the ...

Agathon

Agathon (b. c.445 bc)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
81 words

... Agathon b. c. 445 bc Greek tragic poet Even a god cannot change the past. literally ‘The one thing which even God cannot do is to make undone what has been done’ Aristotle Nicomachaean Ethics bk. 6; see butler God cannot change the past change the past change the past One might perhaps say that this very thing is probable, that many things happen to men that are not probable. Aristotle Art of Rhetoric 1402a; see aristotle that are not ...

A'gathon

A'gathon (c.445–c.400 bc)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
222 words

... ( c. 445– c. 400 bc ) Athenian tragic poet, perhaps the most important apart from the three great tragedians ( see tragedy 4 ) and celebrated for his good looks. Fewer than fifty lines of his work survive. His first victory in the dramatic competitions was gained at the Lenaea in 416 bc when he was probably just under 30. It is the banquet held at his house to celebrate this victory that forms the setting of Plato's Symposium . He appears as a youth in Plato's Protagoras (dramatic date c. 432 bc ). Agathon was innovative: he wrote a...

Agathon the Deacon

Agathon the Deacon   Reference library

Alexander Angelov

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... the Deacon Distinguished archivist and secretary to the Patriarch of Constantinople from c .681 to 713. He served as a lector and notarius at the Third Council of Constantinople (681) which anathematized Monotheletism . A trusted official, Agathon copied the complete conciliar Acta and sent the official creed to the five patriarchates. In 713, Agathon was promoted as an archdeacon, but soon fell out of favour under the Emperor Philippicus Bardanes, a Monothelete sympathizer. Alexander Angelov PBE I, Agatho 3. PmbZ 132. Epilogus , ed. ...

Geschichte des Agathon

Geschichte des Agathon   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to German Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
403 words

...Hippias seeks in vain to convert Agathon from idealism to self-interest, but he brings about an acquaintance with Danae, a hetaera, whom Agathon comes to love; however, on learning her trade, he renounces her and leaves for Syracuse. After a further unsuccessful venture into politics he retires into private life. He goes to Tarento, where he admires the wise rule of Archytas; he discovers that Psyche is his sister, and encounters Danae, now ennobled and become altruistic through her love for Agathon. Agathon, abandoning vague idealism, contents...

Agathon, Patriarch of Alexandria

Agathon, Patriarch of Alexandria (661–77)   Reference library

Christopher Haas

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

..., Patriarch of Alexandria (r. 661–77 ) Successor to Benjamin I as Coptic Patriarch ; his reign is recounted in HistCoptPatr 15. A native of the Mareotis district, Agathon secretly ministered to the non-Chalcedonian ( Miaphysite ) community in Alexandria prior to the Arab conquest . He assisted the ailing Benjamin I in the administration of the Egyptian Church. During his own patriarchate, Agathon ordained numerous clergy, consecrated churches and monasteries , redeemed Christian captives, and negotiated with Egypt ’s new Muslim rulers on...

Agathon

Agathon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Pseudonym used by Henri Massis for co‐authored works.
agathon

agathon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(Greek, the good)In Aristotle, a life that involves the exercise of the highest faculties, fulfilling a person's telos or end. In other philosophies the good is identified with pleasure, or virtue, ...
Agathon

Agathon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Of Athens was the most celebrated tragic poet after the three great masters. (See tragedy, greek.) He won his first victory in 416 bc, and the occasion of Plato's Symposium is a party at his house in ...
Geschichte des Agathon

Geschichte des Agathon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A novel written by C. M. Wieland between 1761 and 1767, and published in 1766–7. It bears as motto the linesQuid virtus et quid sapientia possit,Utile proposuit nobis exemplum.from Horace ...
Friedrich Christian Schlenkert

Friedrich Christian Schlenkert  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(Dresden, 1757–1826, Tharandt nr. Dresden),a Saxon civil servant and teacher, was the author of plays (Agathon und Psyche, 1779; Kein Faustrecht mehr, 1798) and of a large number of ...
Henri Massis

Henri Massis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1886–1970).Never a major writer, Massis was nevertheless central to right‐wing French politics and literature in his period. His early tracts (co‐authored under the pseudonym ‘Agathon’), L'Esprit de ...
Archelāus

Archelāus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
King of Macedon (413–399 bc). He gained the throne by murder and was eventually assassinated by two male lovers. His reign is notable for co‐operation with Athens (supply of shipbuilding materials), ...
summum bonum

summum bonum  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(Latin, the maximum good).That which is an end in itself. The nature of this state preoccupied both ancient and Christian writers (see agathon), although Hobbes probably had the last word: ‘But for ...

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