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affect

A term used in psychology for the experience of feeling or emotion, mood, etc., as opposed to cognition and volition. Affective disorders are characterized by disturbance of mood, with ...

affect

affect n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n. Emotion or subjectively experienced feeling, such as happiness, sadness, fear, or anger. Blunted affect is emotional expression that is significantly reduced in intensity; flat affect is absence or near absence of emotional expression and is also called flattening of affect or affective flattening; inappropriate affect or incongruity of affect is a mismatch between emotional expression and what one is speaking or thinking about; labile affect is instability or fluctuation of emotions; and restricted affect or constricted affect is...

affect

affect   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
66 words

... 1. v. To have an effect on (‘It affected me’). 2. n. The subjective or evaluative dimension in human experience. In psychology, emotion or feeling, mood, or desire which may be reflected nonverbally in affect displays . Psychology has sometimes been divided into the domains of affect, behaviour , and cognition , but affect leaks into all human behaviour and cognition. ...

affect

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A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
118 words

... ( affective , affectivity ) An affect is an emotion. In sociology the use of the term generally implies that an action is being or has been carried out for emotional gratification. Affectivity versus affective neutrality is one of Talcott Parsons's so-called pattern variables for the classification and analysis of societies. This was used to explore the relationship between cognitive and emotional action orientations and social relations. For example, in their discussion of Class Awareness in the United States (1983) , Mary R. Jackman and Robert...

affect

affect n.((in psychiatry))   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
88 words

... n. (in psychiatry) 1. the predominant emotion in a person’s mental state at a particular moment. Blunted affect is a diminished intensity of emotional response; it is a feature of some forms of chronic schizophrenia . Flat affect is an inability to respond emotionally despite the presence of emotions. It is commonly seen in depression. Incongruent affect describes an inappropriate emotional response to a situation (e.g. laughing at a funeral) and may be seen in psychotic illnesses. 2. the emotion associated with a particular idea. — affective ...

affect

affect   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...affect A term used in psychology for the experience of feeling or emotion, mood, etc., as opposed to cognition and volition. Affective disorders are characterized by disturbance of mood, with feelings of elation or sadness being intense and...

affect

affect   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... An individual's emotional response to a situation. In sport psychology, it is often used synonymously with...

affect

affect   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
18 words

... . A term used in psychology for a feeling or emotion, particularly one leading to action. (Published...

affect

affect (mental health)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Social Work and Social Care (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... ( mental health ) The outwardly observable representation of feeling or emotion displayed to others through facial expressions, tone of voice, laughter, tears, etc. The normal range of affect, termed the broad affect, is culturally defined and relative. The term is associated with mood and mood disorders in psychiatry, in which it is used to describe the person’s emotional state from an observer’s (usually a doctor’s) perspective. See also affective disorder ; bipolar disorder...

affect

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A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Some consider that affect describes a process of change within a person; this person is affected and can affect. However, Thrift ( 2004 ) claims that ‘there is no stable definition of affect’; and Bondi (2009) Int. Encycl. Hum. Geog. 446 , describes affect as a ‘feeling, disposition, or mood that exists prior to cognition or rational thought. Often referred to as a mental state, affect is also bodily or sensory and unconscious or nonconscious in character. To be affected is to feel or to be touched or moved’. Shouse (2005) MC J. 8, 6 explains that...

affect

affect   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
337 words

...think of affect in four different ways, respectively: a material thing, a force, a theory, and a mode of expression. First, affect is the medium through which the body relates to the materiality of the world in a manner that is outside conscious thought and intentionality. Second, affect is a sensation, a kind of invisible presence, something felt, and known to be there, but at the same time intangible and not quite there; an emotive predisposition for, and response to, a particular set of conditions. Both as a material phenomenon and force, affect concerns ...

affect

affect n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Nursing (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
67 words

...affect [ af -ekt] n. (in psychiatry) 1. the predominant emotion in a person’s mental state at a particular moment. 2. the emotion associated with a particular idea. blunted a. diminished intensity of emotional response, which is a feature of some forms of schizophrenia and depression. incongruent a. an inappropriate emotional response to a situation, which may be seen in psychotic illnesses. —affective [ă- fek -tiv] ...

affect

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...but we will still feel that pain. Pain, then, belongs to the order of affect and it is autonomous from the circuit of emotion, which is effectively our psychological response to it. In cultural studies , in part because of work by Massumi , and also Lauren Berlant , Lawrence Grossberg , Meaghan Morris , and Elspeth Probyn , affect has become a key term for rethinking ideology . It is generally used to explain why ideology has the hold it does. To some degree this interest in affect is sparked by an interest in the work of Gilles Deleuze , but it also...

affect

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...but we will still feel that pain. Pain, then, belongs to the order of affect and it is autonomous from the circuit of emotion, which is effectively our psychological response to it. In Cultural Studies , in part because of work by Massumi , and also Lauren Berlant , Lawrence Grossberg , Meaghan Morris , and Elspeth Probyn , affect has become a key term for rethinking ideology . It is generally used to explain why ideology has the hold it does. To some degree this interest in affect is sparked by an interest in the work of Gilles Deleuze , but it also...

affect

affect   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...affect The feelings or emotional state of an individual and the influence of this on behavior. ...

affect

affect   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
618 words

...§, at 1. Likewise, effect is sometimes misused for affect . See effect ( b ) . Cf. impact . Affect may also mean “to pretend, feign, or assume (a characteristic) artificially”—e.g.: “One wonders at her choice to have all the actors affect Russian accents.” Marshall Fine , “K-19,” J. News (Westchester Co., N.Y.), 18 July 2002 , at G5. Although affect is almost always a verb, it does have a rare, somewhat vague noun sense in the fields of psychology and psychiatry: “In general, [ affect ] is characterized as a state brought about by actions...

Affect

Affect   Reference library

J. Elmer

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
1,461 words

... . When Wimsatt and Beardsley published “The Affective Fallacy” in 1949 , the term affective was not widespread in lit. crit., though the phenomena they were examining—the range of emotive, psychological, even physiological responses to literary lang.—had been the subject of much discussion. The adjective affective (from the noun affect , “a feeling or subjective experience accompanying a thought or action,” “an emotion, a mood” [ OED ]) provides Wim-satt and Beardsley a label beneath which a great deal of poetic theory—from Aristotle and Longinus...

affect

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A Dictionary of Gender Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology, Politics
Length:
108 words

...affect A term that entered the feminist lexicon in the 2000s to refer to feelings, emotions, and emotional reactions as part of the psychosocial processes that effect people’s lives and interactions. This interest in affect, as opposed to rationality for example, has resulted in Affect Studies as a new area of enquiry where feelings and experiences such as shame, blame, depression, or anger are explored as structuring devices in everyday life. Significantly, many of the emotions explored are negative, are constructed as oppressive, and are regarded as a source...

affect

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A Dictionary of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...affect The emotional aspect of a person’s experience. It can either be used to refer to the observable manifestations of a particular emotional state or the subjective experience of the individual. It is one of the occupational performance components that impacts on and is influenced by occupational performance and occupational engagement ....

affect blends

affect blends   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
12 words

... blends Facial expressions revealing two or more emotions simultaneously. ...

affect display

affect display n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... display n. A form of non-verbal communication in which an emotion or affect is communicated, chiefly in humans by a facial expression . See also display rule , expressive behaviour , kinesics , primary emotions...

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