You are looking at 1-20 of 1,354 entries  for:

  • All: Acts of Uniformity x
clear all

View:

Overview

Acts of Uniformity

Subject: History

A series of English laws intended to secure the legal and doctrinal basis of the Anglican Communion. The first (1549) made the Book of Common Prayer compulsory in church services, with ...

Uniformity, Acts of

Uniformity, Acts of   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
173 words

..., Acts of . 1 The Uniformity Act 1548 , passed in 1549 , imposed the exclusive use of the First Book of Common Prayer in all public services and laid down penalties for holders of benefices who failed to comply. 2 The Uniformity Act 1551, passed in 1552 , ordered the use of the Second BCP. Absence from church on Sundays and Holy Days without reasonable cause was punishable by ecclesiastical censures, and attendance at other forms of service by imprisonment. 3 The Act of Uniformity 1558 , passed in 1559 , ordered the use of the 1552 BCP, with...

Uniformity, Acts of

Uniformity, Acts of   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
71 words

..., Acts of . Four acts of Parliament ( 1549 , 1552 , 1559 , 1662 ) which regulated the worship of the Church of England and the use of the Book of Common Prayer . The 1662 Act, part of the Restoration settlement, contained as an annex the BCP still in use, and required all ministers to assent to it. This Act remains on the statute-book, but has been radically amended by 1974 legislation allowing alternative services...

Uniformity, Acts of

Uniformity, Acts of (1560)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
212 words

..., Acts of ( 1560 , 1666 ), designed to ensure that the nation followed a uniform Protestant liturgy. The 1560 Act for the Uniformity of Common Prayer and Service in the Church (2 Eliz. 1 c. 2) required all clergy in Ireland to use the English Prayer Book of 1559 . Punishments were prescribed for clergy who refused to use the book, with the ultimate sanction for repeated offences being deprivation and life imprisonment. Laity who refused to attend services were subjected to a fine of 12 d . and this was subsequently used to try to force people to...

Uniformity, Acts of

Uniformity, Acts of   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
142 words

..., Acts of , 1549 , 1552 , 1559 , 1662 . By enforcing the use of successive Prayer Books, the Acts provided liturgical conformity in Books of Common Prayer instead of the diverse uses of Sarum, York, Bangor, and Lincoln. Constitutionally and ecclesiastically, though not liturgically, the 1549 Act was ‘a momentous moment’, because Parliament set a precedent by itself authorizing doctrine and liturgy, a royal preserve since 1534 . The 1552 book marked a Zwinglian shift; the mass became the communion, tables replaced altars, the surplice replaced...

Uniformity, Acts of

Uniformity, Acts of (1549)   Reference library

Revd Dr William M. Marshall

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
164 words

..., Acts of , 1549 , 1552 , 1559 , 1662 . By enforcing the use of successive Prayer Books, the Acts provided liturgical conformity in Books of Common Prayer instead of the diverse uses of Sarum, York, Bangor, and Lincoln. Constitutionally and ecclesiastically, though not liturgically, the 1549 Act was ‘a momentous moment’, because Parliament set a precedent by itself authorizing doctrine and liturgy, a royal preserve since 1534 . Liturgically the 1549 book, broadly an abridged Sarum rite in English, catholic in tone, made little change. The ...

Uniformity, Acts of

Uniformity, Acts of   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
117 words

..., Acts of A series of English laws intended to secure the legal and doctrinal basis of the Anglican Communion. The first ( 1549 ) made the Book of Common Prayer compulsory in church services, with severe penalties on non-compliant clergymen. The second ( 1552 ) imposed a revised Prayer Book, which was more Protestant in tone, and laid down punishments for recusants. Mary I had both Acts repealed, but the third ( 1559 ) introduced a third Book of Common Prayer and weekly fines for non-attendance at church. The fourth ( 1662 ) presented a further...

Uniformity, Acts of

Uniformity, Acts of   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
238 words

..., Acts of . The term refers to legislative Acts passed in England in 1549 , 1552 , 1559 , and 1662 , all of which related to the enforcement of Protestantism. The Act of 21 January 1549 (repealed 1553 ) imposed the use of the Book of Common Prayer and specified penalties for those who refused to use it. Public services were required to be in English, except in the universities, where Latin, Greek, or Hebrew could be used. The Act of 14 April 1552 (repealed 1553 ) imposed the use of the revised Book of Common Prayer, and also specified...

Acts of Uniformity

Acts of Uniformity   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
668 words

... of Uniformity . These acts represent the successive efforts of Edward VI and Elizabeth I to impose a standardized form of Protestant worship on the Church of England. Each incorporated a prayer book, and each required the entire realm to use it in worship. The First Act of Uniformity (2 & 3 Edward VI, c. 1) was passed in 1549 . Legally it rested on the royal supremacy, which gave the monarch the right to determine rites and ceremonies for the English church, as Henry VIII had done in 1539 when he requested the Act of Six Articles. In 1547 Edward...

Uniformity, Acts of

Uniformity, Acts of   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
616 words

...Uniformity, Acts of . There have been four: (1) Uniformity Act 1548 . This was passed on 21 Jan. 1549 , and imposed the exclusive use of the First BCP of Edward VI from the ensuing Whitsunday (9 June) in the ‘celebration of the Lord's Supper, commonly called the Mass’ and in all public services. Holders of benefices who did not comply were punishable for a first offence with forfeiture of a year's income and six months' imprisonment, for a second offence with deprivation and a year's imprisonment, and for a third offence with imprisonment for life....

Uniformity, Acts of

Uniformity, Acts of   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

..., Acts of . Two acts ( 1560 , 1666 ) that were intended to standardize Christian worship in Ireland. The first required all clergy to use the English Prayer Book of 1559 ; there were fixed punishments for dereliction, rising to unfrocking and life imprisonment. The act also stated that laity were to be fined for not attending Anglican churches. The second act, in 1666 , applied to Ireland the revised Prayer Book introduced into the English church in 1662 . The acts were of their nature hard to enforce and served mainly as a means of keeping...

Acts of Uniformity

Acts of Uniformity  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A series of English laws intended to secure the legal and doctrinal basis of the Anglican Communion. The first (1549) made the Book of Common Prayer compulsory in church services, with severe ...
Religion

Religion   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,549 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...toward the possibility of accommodation or ‘comprehension’, but parliament eventually carried the Act of Uniformity of 1662 , which required of ministers complete and unfeigned acceptance of the Book of Common Prayer as revised in that year, on pain of deprivation, and insisted on re-ordination of those clergymen who had entered the ministry during the suppression of the Church. Their inability to accept either or both of these stipulations forced more than 900 ministers from their livings, a number at least doubled by earlier deprivations and forced...

Local Government

Local Government   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,202 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the extreme sensitivity of the issue among conservative thinkers (who feared centralization and the appearance of a salaried magistracy). Making improvements in the quality of policing contingent on the decisions of an unelected elite was obviously unsatisfactory. In 1856 a further statute called into existence a uniform police force (although one which was still under the control of the county magistrates). The birth of local government as a provider of local services must be located in both these statutes and the private Acts which preceded them....

Law

Law   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,210 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...isolationist penalties of transportation and incarceration clearly tended to enhance the role of the state in punishment as it diminished that of the community. Moreover, the increased legislative prescription of practical sanctions short of death meant a reduction in the amount of discretion available to trial judges in sentencing, and an end to the need for *pious perjury to moderate the rigours of the law themselves. Indeed, while the central principle of trial by one's peers was maintained for serious offences, and the uniformity of justice was certainly...

Revolution

Revolution   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,734 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...In 1803–4 something like 20 per cent of the adult male populations of the rural counties and 35 per cent of the more industrial and urban counties were enlisted in the volunteers. The result was a country in arms, with a substantial proportion of the British male public holding weapons, something which Pitt had refused to countenance in the winter of 1792–3 . Women also were mobilized, in the buying and sending of uniforms for the troops, in the making of flags and banners for the volunteers, and in the raising of public subscriptions. The government found...

Theatre

Theatre   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,088 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in the rituals of military training, discipline, and the conduct of battle, as well as the costume-like uniforms of both the general and the sub-altern, was profoundly theatrical [ see *war, 2 ]. Other art forms, such as *painting [27] and the *novel [31] , intersected in significant ways with the theatrical. This is apparent in the momentous drama of *history painting , displayed in exhibitions which were themselves sites of communal performance, in the association between gendered subjectivity and performance in the work of novelists such as ...

Policing

Policing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,788 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in military uniform, stationed in barracks, and armed with carbines and pistols. The extent and success of this parliamentary resistance to a police force in England was not the result of any strong civil libertarian impulse among MPs. The House of Commons before 1832 was elected on a very narrow *class [15] basis, and showed no great concern with ordinary people's civil liberties; it suspended habeas corpus to deal with the radical agitations of the 1790s and the immediate postwar period, it resisted initial moves to reduce the number of capital crimes,...

Poetry

Poetry   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,432 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...force to blunt the discriminating powers of the mind, and unfitting it for all voluntary exertion to reduce it to a state of almost savage torpor. The most effective of these causes are the great national events which are daily taking place, and the encreasing accumulation of men in cities, where the uniformity of their occupations produces a craving for extraordinary incident which the rapid communication of intelligence hourly gratifies. In this passage Wordsworth sketches the historical geography of his Romanticism. Paris and the *French Revolution ,...

Enlightenment

Enlightenment   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
7,794 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...alarm he evoked spread among those who did not share his politics. The destruction of Priestley's home, laboratory, and library in the Birmingham *riots of July 1791 was the first sign that hostile words would spill over into deeds. The government, which hardly disapproved of such direct local action, added its own legislative fiats to repression [ see *gagging acts ]. Deliberate intimidation of the leadership of Rational Dissent was one reason for the loss of momentum of the English Enlightenment. In 1794 Joseph Priestley emigrated to America. But it...

Coriolanus

Coriolanus   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,020 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...Balkan-set adaptation of Coriolanus ( 2011 ). Icon Entertainment International / The Kobal Collection Text: The dating of the play in 1608 is further confirmed by two details of its sole authoritative text, published in the Folio in 1623 , namely the specification of cornets in some of the musical stage directions and the division of the play into acts. Both of these features are associated with indoor theatres (which could use smaller brass instruments than the public amphitheatres, and needed pauses in the action for the changing of footlights), and...

View: