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Acamas

Son of Theseus and brother of Demophon (1). Unknown to the Iliad, the brothers are certainly present at Troy in the Iliu Persis (fr. 4 Davies), and free their grandmother ...

Acamas

Acamas   Reference library

Emily Kearns

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
136 words

... , son of Theseus and brother of Demophon ( 1 ) . Unknown to the Iliad , the brothers are certainly present at Troy in the Iliu Persis (fr. 4 Davies), and free their grandmother Aethra from her servitude there. They share other adventures in the later mythological tradition; when young, they are sent to Euboea for safety, and on their return from Troy both are connected with the seizure of the Palladium and involuntary homicide. The usual distinguishing feature of Acamas is his interest in distant places, and as the leader of colonizing...

Acamas

Acamas  

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Son of Theseus and brother of Demophon (1). Unknown to the Iliad, the brothers are certainly present at Troy in the Iliu Persis (fr. 4 Davies), and free their grandmother ...
Demophon

Demophon  

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1 Son of Theseus, often found paired with his brother Acamas. Both were sent to Euboea for safety, and from there (in the Epic Cycle) went to Troy, where they ...
Laodice

Laodice  

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Overview Page
In mythology, a stock name for women of high rank, meaning ‘princess’ (cf. Creon; Creusa), e.g. (a) a daughter of Priam (see Acamas; Demophon (1), (b) a daughter of Agapenor ...
Demoph(o)ōn

Demoph(o)ōn   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
70 words

...1. In Greek myth, son of Theseus, brother of Acamas, who succeeded his father as king of Athens. In his reign the Palladium came to Athens; his sanctuary was part of the Palladian complex. 2. In Greek myth, Eleusinian hero, son of Celeus and Metaneira whom Demeter attempted to make immortal. His role as young boy in the triad of Demeter, Persephone, and youth was taken over by...

Menestheus

Menestheus   Reference library

Emily Kearns

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
85 words

..., leader or joint leader of the Athenian forces at Troy in the account in Homer's Iliad He is remarkable for his lack of prominence in the story, and in later Athenian accounts is at least partially eclipsed by the sons of Theseus ( see Acamas ; Demophon (1) ). Plutarch ( Thes. 35) depicts him as an enemy of Theseus who brings about his exile. F. Cantarelli , Rend. Ist. Lom. 108 (1974), 459–505; LIMC 6. 1 (1992), 473–5; Gantz , EGM 297–8. Emily...

Munichus

Munichus ((later Munychus))   Reference library

Emily Kearns

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
98 words

... Orchomenus ( 1 ) ( Diodorus , FGrH 372 F 39) and founded the temple of Artemis Munichia ( Suda , entry under Ἔμβαρος εἶμι). Though he is connected with Theseus , appearing in the fight against the Amazons on Beazley, ARV 2 1174. 6, he is distinct from Munitos, son of Acamas or Demophon (1) . L. Palaiokrassa , Τὸ ἱερὸ τῆς Ἀρτέμιδος Μουνιχίας (1991), 23–9 (sources), 36–7 and LIMC 6. 635–7. Emily...

Demophon

Demophon (1)   Reference library

Emily Kearns

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
255 words

... (1) Son of Theseus , often found paired with his brother Acamas . Both were sent to Euboea for safety, and from there (in the Epic Cycle ) went to Troy, where they freed their grandmother Aethra from captivity. Each is named as lover of Laodice (1) in Troy and Phyllis in Thrace , and each, on his return to Athens, was linked with an involuntary homicide centring on the Palladium . Where their myths diverge, Acamas tends to act as colonizer while Demophon succeeds Theseus as king of Athens. It was in his reign that the Palladium (in various...

Chythri

Chythri   Reference library

Hector William Catling

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
161 words

... (mod. Kythrea ) , a small inland city of Cyprus in a long-populated region, possibly the ‘Kitrusi’ of the Esarhaddon prism of 673 / 2 bc (an Assyrian text). 11th-cent. bc tombs give some credence to the supposed foundation by Chytrus, grandson of Acamas . The largely unexcavated site (Ayios Dimitrianos) lies 14 km. (8½ mi.) NE of Nicosia, below Mt. Pentadaktylos on the northern fringe of the Mesaoria; it is close to the island's most abundant spring, Kephalovryso, whose waters were channelled to Salamis (2) -Constantia, perhaps in Roman,...

Aethra

Aethra   Reference library

Herbert Jennings Rose and Jennifer R. March

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
245 words

...Cycle ( Iliu Persis fr. 4 Davies) and illustrated on the chest of Cypselus (Paus. 5. 19. 3) says that she was carried off by the Dioscuri when they came to rescue Helen from her abduction by Theseus (Apollod. 3. 10. 7, Epit. 1. 23). Her grandsons, Demophon (1) and Acamas , took her home when Troy fell ( Iliu Persis fr. 4 Davies; Apollod. Epit. 5. 22; cf. Paus. 10. 25. 7–8). Aethra is depicted in various scenes in art from the 6th cent. bc on: she is pursued by Poseidon, rescued from Troy by her grandsons, and, in a scene unknown to surviving...

Theseus

Theseus   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,296 words

...paternity predominates in Troezenian legend and Aegeus’ in Attic sources, Bacchylides 17 and Euripides’ Hippolytus show that the two traditions were not always mutually exclusive. Theseus was believed to have fathered many sons by rape, seduction, or marriage, including Acamas and Demophon, who replace Homer's Menestheus as leaders of the Athenian contingent before Troy in later epic and in tragedy. Plutarch provides a comprehensive account of the hero's life and deeds in his Life of Theseus . The earliest evidence for Theseus’ youth dates from the...

Equestrian Monuments

Equestrian Monuments   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,291 words

...suggests that one identity will not fit every figure. Candidates include victorious athletes, cavalry officers, Poseidon (one of the few divinities shown mounted), the Dioscuri (twin sons of Zeus, one of whom, Polydeuces, or Pollux, usually bears the epithet “horse tamer”), and Acamas and Demophon (the sons of Theseus), who are shown with horses in vase painting. One of the best preserved of the marble Acropolis horsemen, the Rampin Rider (sixth century bce ), illustrates this problem. Nude and bearded, he wears a wreath, suggesting to some that he is an...

Theseus

Theseus   Reference library

Emily Kearns and Karim W. Arafat

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,617 words
Illustration(s):
1

...of this union. In either case, he was forced to hand her back to her brothers the Dioscuri (Castor and Pollux/Polydeuces) when they invaded Attica. This gave Theseus’ enemies, headed by Menestheus , their chance, and in the ensuing political confusion Theseus sent his sons Acamas and Demophon to Euboea and himself fled to Scyros, where he was treacherously killed by King Lycomedes. The formation of this tradition has clearly been influenced at several points by the figure of Heracles, notably in the monster-killing episodes at the beginning of his...

Theseus

Theseus   Reference library

Emily Kearns and Karim W. Arafat

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,762 words

...191) and others to be the child of this union. In either case, he was forced to hand her back to her brothers the Dioscuri when they invaded Attica. This gave Theseus' enemies, headed by Menestheus , their chance, and in the ensuing political confusion Theseus sent his sons Acamas and Demophon to Euboea and himself fled to Scyros , where he was treacherously killed by King Lycomedes. The formation of this tradition has clearly been influenced at several points by the figure of Heracles, notably in the monster-killing episodes at the beginning of his...

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