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Absolon

Subject: Literature

Is the author of a lost Middle High German epic poem dealing with the exploits and death of the Emperor Barbarossa (see Friedrich I, Kaiser). He is mentioned by Rudolf ...

Absolon

Absolon   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to German Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
66 words

... is the author of a lost Middle High German epic poem dealing with the exploits and death of the Emperor Barbarossa ( see Friedrich I, Kaiser ). He is mentioned by Rudolf von Ems in Alexander and Willehalm von Orlens and his poem was written between 1190 and c. 1230 , an instance of a virtually contemporary subject. Absolon came of a family resident in the Lake Constance...

Absolon

Absolon (1)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... (1) in the Old Testament, the son of King David (2 Sam. 13–19:8), whose beauty and whose splendid head of hair (2 Sam. 14:26) were famous. In medieval literature he became a traditional example of male beauty (an elaborate rhetorical description by Peter of Riga gave him golden hair); thus he figures in the ballade sung by the ladies in the Prologue to The Legend of Good Women ‘Hyd, Absolon, thy gilte tresses...

Absolon

Absolon (2)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... (2) , the Oxford parish clerk in The Miller's Tale , the rival of the clerk Nicholas for the affections of Alison. We are given a formal portrait of him (I.3312–80). He has something in common with his biblical namesake—good looks and flowing locks (he probably ought to have been tonsured). He is something of a dandy, who takes great care over his appearance, and he is jolif (amorous, lusty), fancying himself as a wooer. Besides being a parish clerk (with an eye for the wives of the parish), Absolon is also a barber surgeon, and skilled in...

Absolon

Absolon   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
30 words

... • Current frequencies: GB 113, Ireland 0 • GB frequency 1881: 79 • Main GB location 1881: Berks; Norfolk; Perths English : see Absalom . Absolon, 1881 frequency. © Archer...

Absolon

Absolon  

The Oxford parish clerk in The Miller's Tale, the rival of the clerk Nicholas for the affections of Alison. We are given a formal portrait of him (I.3312–80). He has ...
Absolon

Absolon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Is the author of a lost Middle High German epic poem dealing with the exploits and death of the Emperor Barbarossa (see Friedrich I, Kaiser). He is mentioned by Rudolf ...
Absolon

Absolon  

In the Old Testament, the son of King David (2 Sam. 13–19:8), whose beauty and whose splendid head of hair (2 Sam. 14:26) were famous. In medieval literature he became ...
Alison

Alison  

The young wife of the carpenter in The Miller's Tale, desired by both Nicholas and Absolon (2). The formal portrait of her (I.3233–70) has been much admired, and is often ...
Achitofel

Achitofel  

The wicked counsellor of King David, who incited Absolon (1) to rebel against his father (2 Sam. 15–17), cited as a famous traitor in The Book of the Duchess (1118).[...]
Achitofel

Achitofel   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

..., Ahitophel , the wicked counsellor of King David, who incited Absolon (1) to rebel against his father (2 Sam. 15–17), cited as a famous traitor in The Book of the Duchess ...

Peter of Riga

Peter of Riga (c.1140–1209)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...of Reims, was the author of Aurora , a popular and influential versification of parts of the Bible. Chaucer mentions it in The Book of the Duchess as the source for the statement that the Greeks say that Pythagoras invented the art of song ( 1167–70 ). Possibly the detail of Absolon 's golden hair (I.3314) comes from Peter's description of the beauty of the Old Testament character. Beichner, Paul E. (1965) (ed.), Peter of Riga , Aurora , 2 vols. (Notre Dame,...

Herro

Herro   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...stormy night he was drowned, and Hero threw herself into the sea. She is mentioned in the Introduction to The Man of Law's Tale among the saints of Cupid (II.69), but her story is not in The Legend of Good Women as it stands. She is, however, mentioned in the ballade ‘Hyd, Absolon’, in the Prologue to LGW (F 263, G 217). Chaucer probably knew the story from Ovid's Heroides ...

Poules, Seinte

Poules, Seinte   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...m) and must have dominated the landscape of the city. It was damaged beyond repair in the Great Fire of 1666 . Chaucer's references show how familiar it must have been: the Parson did not run ‘unto Seinte Poules’ to find a position as a chantry priest (I.509), the elegant Absolon (2) had ‘Poules wyndow’ carved on his shoes (I.3318, i.e. they were cut and latticed so that they looked like the cathedral's windows), the Host swears by ‘Seint Poules belle’...

Alison

Alison (1)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...(1) , ( Alisoun ) the young wife of the carpenter in The Miller's Tale , desired by both Nicholas and Absolon (2) . The formal portrait of her (I.3233–70) has been much admired, and is often quoted as an example of the physical naturalism which pervades the Tale. Her animal vitality is suggested by a series of rustic images: her body is compared to that of a weasel, the colour of her brows to that of a sloe, she is softer than ‘the wolle is of a wether’; her song is like that of a swallow, she skips like a kid or a calf, and so on (all this makes...

Laodomya

Laodomya   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...is one of the heroic examples mentioned by Dorigen in The Franklin's Tale (V.1445–7). In the Introduction to The Man of Law's Tale her story is said to be available in Chaucer's ‘ Seintes Legende of Cupide ’ (II.71). But although she is mentioned in the ballade ‘Hyd Absolon’ in the Prologue to The Legend of Good Women (F 263, G 217), her story does not appear in the collection in the form in which we have it. Perhaps Chaucer recognized it as an appropriate one and thought of including...

ballade

ballade   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...of Venus (both triple ballades—three ballades connected, with an envoy), Against Women Unconstant , Truth , Gentilesse , Lak of Stedfastnesse , Lenvoy de Chaucer a Scogan (a double ballade), Lenvoy de Chaucer a Bukton , The Complaint of Chaucer to his Purse , and ‘Hyd, Absolon, thy gilte tresses clere’ in the Prologue to The Legend of Good Women (F 249–69, G...

Herodes

Herodes   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...the tetrarch ( 4 bc – ad 34 ), who beheaded John the Baptist. In the medieval drama , Herod was often a melodramatic tyrant who ranted and blustered (cf. Shakespeare's phrase ‘out-herods Herod’, applied to actors who tear a passion to tatters). This is the part which Absolon in The Miller's Tale plays ‘to shewe his lightnesse and maistrye’ (I.3383–4). The Pardoner cites Herod (Antipas) as an example of drunkenness, who, filled with wine at his own table (a later addition to the biblical account), ordered the beheading of the Baptist (VI.488–91)....

Miller's Prologue and Tale, The

Miller's Prologue and Tale, The   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...and disport themselves all night in the carpenter's bed. Absolon, who has not seen the carpenter about, has decided that the moment has come to tell Alison of his love-longing, and at the first cockcrow he comes and stands beneath the window, and calls Alison. His avowals of love are not well received, but when Alison discovers that a kiss will send him on his way she promises him one and devises a jape. Absolon kneels down and makes ready; Alison opens the window and sticks out her bottom. Absolon kisses her naked arse and starts back in considerable...

Canace

Canace (1)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...of an incestuous relationship with her brother, Macareus, and took her own life. The passionate lament given to her by Ovid in the Heroides was well known in the Middle Ages, and was used by Gower and Lydgate . Chaucer mentions the story twice. In the ballade , ‘Hyd, Absolon, thy gilte tresses clere’, in the Prologue to The Legend of Good Women , Canace is mentioned in a group of tragic lovers (F 265, G 219), and in the Introduction to The Man of Law's Tale , which refers directly to heroines whose stories are told in The Legend of Good Women it...

holyday

holyday   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...part of the texture of ordinary life, and the setting for some not very holy vignettes: it is on Sunday that the Wife of Bath puts on her voluminous headgear. The carpenter's wife goes to the parish church ‘on an haliday’ (I.3309) (possibly a feast to be kept by women) where Absolon censes the ‘wyves of the parisshe’ (3340–1). Symkyn and his wife parade with much show ‘on halydayes’ (I.3951–62). The Parson , however, rebukes those who make their servants work ‘out of tyme, as on haly dayes’. Cupid also has his ‘halydayes’ ( LGW 422; cf. 35). ( See also...

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