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Abbey Theatre

Subject: Literature

First permanent home of the Irish National Theatre, founded in 1904 by Lady Gregory, Edward Martyn, and W. B. Yeats to foster native drama. Dramatic scenes came four years later with riots ...

Abbey Theatre

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
59 words

... Theatre Theatre erected on Abbey Street, Dublin ( 1904 ), by Annie E. F. Horniman to house the Irish National Theatre Society. In 1925 the Abbey became the National Theatre of Ireland. Works by W. B. Yeats , Lady Gregory , J. M. Synge and Sean O'Casey have been introduced here, and the Theatre is renowned for its support of new...

Abbey Theatre

Abbey Theatre   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
3,582 words

...debate within their walls. The Irish National Theatre Society (founded in the summer of 1902 ) took up a not dissimilar mission at the Abbey: educating the public by means of self-improving entertainment and with almost identical exclusions (including the serving of nonalcoholic refreshments). Like its high-brow forerunner, the subscription-based Irish Literary Theatre (which had short performing seasons from 1899 to 1901 ), the Abbey was officially licensed as both a national and a literary theater. The Abbey's patent was dependent on its agreement not to...

Abbey theatre

Abbey theatre   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
60 words

... theatre First permanent home of the Irish National Theatre, founded in 1904 by Lady Gregory, Edward Martyn , and W. B. Yeats to foster native drama. Dramatic scenes came four years later with riots at the first night of J. M. Synge 's The Playboy of the Western World . The original building was destroyed by fire in 1951...

Abbey Theatre

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Adrian Frazier

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
669 words

... Theatre Home of the National Theatre of Ireland, in Dublin . Theatre-as-building and theatre-as-company are quite distinct. The Irish National Theatre Society ( INTS ) was created by Frank and W. G. Fay 's National Dramatic Company following its performances of Cathleen ni Houlihan (by W. B. Yeats and Augusta Gregory ) and Deirdre (by Æ ) in April 1902 . The INTS aimed to employ Irish actors and to create a distinctive style: simple staging; fine words finely spoken; and vivid characterization in the small roles. Yeats, the first president of...

Abbey Theatre

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The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
789 words

... Theatre The Irish Literary Theatre, founded by Augusta Gregory (Lady Gregory), Edward Martyn and W. B. Yeats in 1898 with its first production a year later, became the Irish National Theatre Society in 1903 (absorbing the National Dramatic Society of William and Frank Fay ) as well as the lessees of the old Mechanics' Theatre in Abbey Street, Dublin, subsequently known as the Abbey Theatre. The first production (on 27 December 1904 ) was a double bill of Lady Gregory's folk comedy Spreading the News and Yeats's verse drama On Baile's...

Abbey theatre

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John Saunders

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
107 words

... theatre . First permanent home of the Irish National Theatre, founded by Lady Gregory , Edward Martyn , and W. B. Yeats to foster native drama. Yeats’s verse play On Baile’s Strand was the opening production in 1904 but more dramatic scenes came four years later with riots at the first night of J. M. Synge ’s The Playboy of the Western World . Controversy also surrounded the staging of plays by Shaw and O’Casey , though the latter’s The Shadow of a Gunman marked a decisive shift from Celtic twilight to Dublin tenement. The original building,...

Abbey Theatre

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The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
494 words

... Theatre Home of the National Theatre of Ireland. The Irish National Theatre Society ( INTS ) was created by Frank and W. G. Fay 's National Dramatic Company following its performances of Cathleen ni Houlihan (by *Yeats and Lady *Gregory ) and Deirdre (by Æ) in 1902 . Yeats, its first president, fostered a ‘theatre of beauty’, not of commerce or propaganda. English heiress Annie *Horniman , who ‘detested all things Irish’ but was fond of Yeats, bought the Hibernian Theatre of Varieties and Mechanics' Institute on Abbey Street, Dublin, and let...

Abbey Theatre

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The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
623 words

... Theatre , Dublin, opened in 1904 as the permanent home of the National Theatre Society ( see IRISH NATIONAL DRAMATIC SOCIETY ). Funds were supplied by Miss Horniman , who also gave the theatre an annual subsidy. The first directors were Lady Gregory , Synge , and Yeats . From the first the theatre was under pressure from the nationalists, within the company and outside, to conform politically. Yeats, for example, defended Synge's The Playboy of the Western World ( 1907 ) with a passion equal to that of audiences who condemned it as a betrayal...

Abbey theatre

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The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
253 words

... theatre , Dublin, created in 1904 as a successor to the Irish Literary theatre founded in Dublin 1899 by littérateurs (including Yeats , Lady Gregory , and Edward Martyn ( 1859–1923 ) and amateur actors wishing to produce an Irish national drama in opposition to commercial theatre. Initially envisaged as a poetic theatre, the Abbey became dominated by easily stereotyped forms of ‘realism’. Much of its history has been dominated by conflict between its rival inspirations, patriotism (often linked to puritanism) and artistic excellence. This was...

Abbey Theatre, The

Abbey Theatre, The   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... in 1902 . The Irish Literary Theatre and the Irish National Dramatic Society subsequently amalgamated to become the Irish National Theatre Society, which staged J. M. Synge's Riders to the Sea in 1904 . In that year Miss Annie F. Horniman provided the company with funding to purchase and equip the theatre in Abbey Street. On its opening night in 1904 , the Abbey Theatre presented Yeats's On Baile's Strand, Cathleen Ni Houlihan , and Lady Gregory's Spreading the News . Tensions between those who supported the theatre as a platform for political...

Abbey Theatre, Dublin

Abbey Theatre, Dublin   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
374 words

... Theatre, Dublin Opened on 27 December 1904 with a double bill of one-act plays, W. B. Yeats 's On Baile's Strand and Spreading the News by Lady Gregory . The theatre rapidly became a focus of the Irish Revival . In 1903 Annie Horniman decided to provide a permanent Dublin home for the Irish National Theatre Society, an amateur company led by F. J. and W. G. Fay (which had Yeats for its president) and took over the disused theatre of the Mechanics' Institute in Abbey Street, together with the old city morgue next door, and converted them into...

Abbey Theatre, Dublin

Abbey Theatre, Dublin   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
488 words

...the Abbey's finances became perilous, although O'Casey 's The Shadow of a Gunman ( 1923 ), Juno and the Paycock ( 1924 ), and The Plough and the Stars ( 1926 ) brought some respite. In 1925 the Abbey received a grant from the government of the new Irish Free State, thus becoming the first state‐subsidized theatre in the English‐speaking world. From the late 1930s more plays were performed in Irish, and actors were required to be bilingual. In 1951 the theatre was burned down, and the company played in the Queen's Theatre until the new Abbey opened...

Abbey Theatre, The

Abbey Theatre, The   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to Irish Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Literature
Length:
1,532 words

... Theatre, The , ( Irish Literary Theatre ; later Irish National Theatre ), grew out of the literary revival that took place after the death of Parnell in 1891 . Irish writers had nothing like the same access to a history of theatrical achievement as those in other European countries. Anglo-Irish dramatists as various as George Farquhar , R. B. Sheridan , Dion Boucicault , and Oscar Wilde had written successfully for the stage, but with London and even American audiences in mind. The Abbey had its beginnings in the summer of 1897 at Duras...

Abbey Theatre

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Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... Theatre . Ireland's national theatre, on Lower Abbey Street, Dublin, where it was founded in 1904 . It was built at the instigation of the Celtic revivalists W.B. Yeats ( 1865–1939 ) and Lady Gregory ( 1852–1932 ) and soon gained prestige for its productions of Irish playwrights such as Yeats himself, J.M. Synge and Sean O'Casey . Some stagings have caused controversy and even riots, notably the first productions of Synge's The Playboy of the Western World ( 1907 ) and O'Casey's The Plough and the Stars ( 1926 ). The latter questioned the...

Abbey Theatre

Abbey Theatre   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... Theatre . A theatre in Dublin established as the home of the Irish National Theatre Society largely through the efforts of W.B. Yeats and Lady Gregory . It opened on 27 December 1904 with Yeats's On Baile's Strand and Lady Gregory 's Spreading the News in a building in Abbey Street acquired thanks to the generosity of Annie Horniman ( see Miss Horniman ), a Quaker heiress. It was the main focus of the Irish Literary Revival and its company presented the plays of J.M. Synge (notably The playboy of the western world ) and those of Sean...

Abbey Theatre

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Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
54 words
Abbey Theatre

Abbey Theatre   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
45 words
Abbey Theatre

Abbey Theatre  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
First permanent home of the Irish National Theatre, founded in 1904 by Lady Gregory, Edward Martyn, and W. B. Yeats to foster native drama. Dramatic scenes came four years later with riots at the ...
King John

King John   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,371 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the news of his reconciliation to the Church. The Bastard defies the Dauphin on John’s behalf and the two sides prepare for battle. 5.3 In the battle John, growing faint with fever, learns that French reinforcements have been wrecked on the Goodwin Sands: he retreats to the abbey at Swineshead. 5.4 Salisbury, Pembroke, and Bigot are dismayed to learn from the dying Count Melun that the Dauphin means to kill them if he wins the battle: at Melun’s urging they set out to rejoin King John. 5.5 The Dauphin, close to victory, learns of the English lords’...

Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,203 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...been performed in America in 1774 , in Charleston, but enjoyed its greatest vogue during the following century (when it was played in 51 different theatres in New York alone): most famously (and infamously), it was a favourite of the Booths , Edwin playing Brutus on tours throughout the States. A benefit performance of the play in 1738 had helped pay for Scheemakers ’s statue of Shakespeare in Westminster Abbey, and another took place in New York in 1864 to pay for the statue of Shakespeare in Central Park. Edwin Booth played Brutus, Junius Booth was...

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