You are looking at 1-9 of 9 entries  for:

  • All: AGRARIAN LAWS x
  • Human Rights and Immigration x
clear all

View:

Overview

Agrarian Laws

Subject: Religion

The economy envisaged by the laws of the Torah was purely agricultural. The people of Israel were entering a land of milk and honey, blessed by the seven species (Dt. ...

Egypt from Nasser to the Present

Egypt from Nasser to the Present   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
6,734 words

...two sequestration laws (138/61 and 140/61) were enacted. They did not dispossess owners but deprived them of the right to manage their properties. According to government statistics, all the measures involved approximately four thousand families. Indeed, the government's measures removed some obstacles to achieving social justice through agrarian reform, increased taxation, and improved social services, but the results fell far short of the regime's initial promise of a better life for the poor. The long-awaited agrarian reform law of 1952 , which limited...

Colombia

Colombia   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
4,933 words

...in 1964 and the FARC in 1966 (noted above). In response to this insurgent challenge in 1968 , the Colombian congress passed Law 48, which allowed the military to legally recruit and utilize members of the civilian population in the collection of information and in the targeting of suspected “subversives.” The militarization of internal order continued the inequalities in the countryside. Rather than implement nationwide agrarian reform, government leaders relied on peasants to colonize new territories and establish new communities with little or no state...

Indigenous Peoples

Indigenous Peoples   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
8,166 words

...Inuit legal practices and customary law, with a strong emphasis on resocialization and the principle of extensive lay participation in the administration of justice. The Navaho of the United States set up their own Navaho courts that obtained some remarkable results locally. Countries that have been able to incorporate respect for customary indigenous law in their formal legal systems find that justice is handled more effectively, particularly when dealing with civil and family law but also in certain areas of criminal law, so that a sort of legal pluralism...

Japan

Japan   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
7,584 words

...the Ainu as Japan's only ethnic minority. Population estimates vary but suggest about twenty-four thousand, mostly resident in Hokkaido. Policy in the mid-nineteenth century regarded Hokkaido as an “empty land” to be colonized by Japan. A law passed in 1899 aimed to tie down the Ainu hunter-gatherers to a settled agrarian lifestyle, and it was expected that they would soon disappear into the majority Japanese population. Some communities retained a sense of identity, but their language almost disappeared. During the 1970s there emerged a notion of Ainu...

Guatemala

Guatemala   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
7,080 words

...contemplated in the labor code, directly challenging the interests of UFCO and precipitating an irreversible conflict. But perhaps the principal determining factor for the fate of the revolution came in June 1952 , when the Guatemalan congress passed Decree 900, the Agrarian Reform Law. This established mechanisms for the expropriation of idle land from holdings of over 223 acres and its subsequent distribution to eligible recipients, principally peasants without land titles, who over time would pay for it. Much of the land affected belonged to UFCO, and...

Brazil

Brazil   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
8,488 words

...but under his regime some rights of Brazil's working class were formally recognized by the state for the first time. A Ministry of Labor was created, and labor unions were accorded legal status. As industrialization proceeded, the working class grew. Brazil was still an agrarian society, but its cities developed, its economy became more complex, and republican ideas of equality of citizenship were promulgated. The middle class expanded, and a civil service run on meritocratic lines was created within the state apparatus. Vargas was deposed in 1945 ,...

South American Southern Cone

South American Southern Cone   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
9,897 words

...Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Uruguay, Paraguay pursued a different model of economic growth. The regime distributed government-owned lands to small and medium farmers to increase commercial farming and strengthen the control of the Colorado Party over rural areas. Traditional agrarian elites continued to make money, while the beneficiaries of the agricultural colonization program were bound to the regime. The regime promoted various development projects, including the construction of the expensive Itaipú Dam, and encouraged limited industrial and urban...

Armenians in the Ottoman Empire

Armenians in the Ottoman Empire   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
8,952 words

...Muslims to stand up to the despotic sultan. In their peaceful protests, Armenians asked a fundamental question: can a Christian be the equal of a Muslim in the Ottoman Empire? The Hamidian Era Massacres In 1891 and 1892 Armenian reformers went to Sasun to help the Armenian agrarian community organize resistance to tax extortion. The resistance led to a confrontation in which a few Kurds and Armenians were killed. Shortly thereafter, the sultan ordered nomadic Kurds to invade Sasun and the Armenian villages of the region. When, in the spring of 1894 , the...

China

China   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
13,083 words

...Proletarian Cultural Revolution, during which another million people died. Overall, however, the failure of the Great Leap Forward and the resulting famine helped convince some within the party elite that socialized agriculture was an unworkable and perhaps even utopian policy. Agrarian radicalism continued, but in the wake of the famine it was tempered by a new pragmatism that stressed the absolute importance of ensuring stable and adequate food supplies. Never again would the CCP seek to radically restructure the agricultural sector or mobilize rural labor in...

View: