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7-20-8

(1907), a “comedy of to‐day” by Augustin Daly. [Daly's Theatre, 49 perf.] Portrait of a Lady, picture #728 at the annual Academy exhibition, so lovingly depicts a beautiful woman ...

Georges Clemenceau

Georges Clemenceau (1841–1929)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
219 words

...is easier to make war than to make peace. speech at Verdun, 20 July 1919, in Discours de Paix (1938) easier to make war than to make peace What do you expect when I'm between two men of whom one [ Lloyd George ] thinks he is Napoleon and the other [ Woodrow Wilson ] thinks he is Jesus Christ? to André Tardieu, on being asked why he always gave in to lloyd george at the Paris Peace Conference, 1918 James Lees-Milne Harold Nicolson (1980) vol. 1, ch. 7, letter from Nicolson to his wife, 20 May 1919 thinks he is Napoleon thinks he is Jesus ...

Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser (15521599)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
228 words

...Earl of Devon (who died in 1419) and his wife, at Tiverton. Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song. This line is repeated at the end of each verse of Spenser's Prothalamion (1596). In Handbook of 20th Century Quotations , ed. Frank S. Pepper (1984), it is attributed to T.S. Eliot in The Waste Land (1922). As with Eliot 7 , Eliot 8 , this is another example of Eliot's magpie-like use of quotation misleading readers who do not plunge in among his fairly copious notes Sleep after toil, port after stormy seas, Ease after war, death after life...

Harold Macmillan

Harold Macmillan (1894–1986)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
381 words

...was the Democratic Party slogan during the 1952 US election campaign speech at Bedford, 20 July 1957, in Times 22 July 1957 never had it so good never had it so good I thought the best thing to do was to settle up these little local difficulties, and then turn to the wider vision of the Commonwealth. on leaving for a Commonwealth tour, following the resignation of the Chancellor of the Exchequer and others statement at London airport, 7 January 1958; in Times 8 January 1958 little local difficulties little local difficulties The wind of change is...

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
420 words

...with lightning No nation is fit to sit in judgement upon any other nation. speech in New York, 20 April 1915; in Selected Addresses (1918) No nation is fit fit to sit in judgement There is such a thing as a man being too proud to fight. speech in Philadelphia, 10 May 1915; in Selected Addresses (1918) p. 88 too proud to fight too proud to fight We have stood apart, studiously neutral. speech to Congress, 7 December 1915, in New York Times 8 December 1915 have stood apart studiously neutral studiously neutral It must be a peace without...

Henry Kissinger

Henry Kissinger (1923– )   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
357 words

... Kissinger 1923 –   German -born American politician , US Secretary of State 1973–7 There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full. in New York Times Magazine 1 June 1969 cannot be a crisis my schedule is already full Power is the great aphrodisiac. in New York Times 19 January 1971 power is the great aphrodisiac Power is the great aphrodisiac The illegal we do immediately. The unconstitutional takes a little longer. in Washington Post 20 January 1977; attributed illegal we do immediately unconstitutional takes a little...

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
338 words

...writing history with lightning writing history with lightning No nation is fit to sit in judgement upon any other nation. speech in New York, 20 April 1915 nation fit to sit in judgement nation fit to sit in judgement There is such a thing as a man being too proud to fight. speech in Philadelphia, 10 May 1915 too proud to fight too proud to fight We have stood apart, studiously neutral. speech to Congress, 7 December 1915 apart , studiously neutral apart, studiously neutral apart, studiously neutral It must be a peace without victory…Only a peace...

Aristotle

Aristotle (384–322 bc)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,547 words

...good of man must be the end [ i.e. objective ] of the science of politics. Nicomachean Ethics bk. 1, 1094b 6–7 good of man science of politics The end of this science [ethics] is not knowledge but action. Nicomachean Ethics bk. 1 1095a; see carlyle not knowledge but action not knowledge but action The Good of man is the active exercise of his soul's faculties in conformity with excellence or virtue. Nicomachean Ethics bk. 1, 1098a 16–20 good of man exercise of his soul's faculties exercise of his soul's faculties in conformity with excellence...

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
638 words

...with lightning No nation is fit to sit in judgement upon any other nation. speech in New York, 20 April 1915 No nation is fit fit to sit in judgement There is such a thing as a man being too proud to fight; there is such a thing as a nation being so right that it does not need to convince others by force that it is right. speech in Philadelphia, 10 May 1915 too proud to fight too proud to fight We have stood apart, studiously neutral. speech to Congress, 7 December 1915 have stood apart studiously neutral studiously neutral America can not be an...

Seneca (‘the Younger’)

Seneca (‘the Younger’) (c.4 bc–ad 65)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
665 words

...if one follows patterns. Epistulae Morales [Letters to Lucilius] no. 6, sect. 5 long if one follows precepts long if one follows precepts if one follows patterns Homines dum docent discunt. Even while they teach, men learn. Epistulae Morales [Letters to Lucilius] no. 7, sect. 8 dum docent discunt dum docent discunt Even while they teach while they teach, men learn A small debt makes a man your debtor; a large one, an enemy. Epistulae Morales [Letters to Lucilius] no. 19 small debt makes a man large one, an enemy large one, an enemy They are...

Mahāyāna Buddhist texts

Mahāyāna Buddhist texts   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
921 words

...in 8,000 Lines ( c. 100 bc – ad 100) ch. 3, v. 58 perfection of wisdom perfection of wisdom Where there is no perception, appellation, conception, or conventional expression, there one speaks of ‘perfect wisdom’. Perfect Wisdom in 8,000 Lines ( c. 100 bc – ad 100) ch. 7, v. 177 no perception , appellation conventional expression A Bodhisattva who is full of pity and concerned with the welfare of all beings, who dwells in friendliness, compassion, sympathetic joy and even mindedness. Perfect Wisdom in 8,000 Lines ( c. 100 bc – ad 100) ch. 20, v....

The Bible (Authorized Version, 1611)

The Bible (Authorized Version, 1611)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
39,862 words

...fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me. Exodus ch. 20, v. 5; see book of common prayer , french am a jealous God visiting the iniquity upon the children third and fourth generation Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain. Exodus ch. 20, v. 7 name of God in vain name of God in vain Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: Exodus ch. 20, v. 8 remember the sabbath day Remember the sabbath day sabbath day, keep it holy six days shalt...

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882–1945)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
729 words

...Papers (1941) vol. 9 four essential human freedoms first is freedom of speech second is freedom to worship third is freedom from want fourth is freedom from fear Yesterday, December 7, 1941—a date which will live in infamy—the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan. address to Congress, 8 December 1941, in Public Papers (1950) vol. 10 Listen date which will live in infamy date which will live in infamy Books can not be killed by fire. People die, but books never die. No man...

Harold Macmillan

Harold Macmillan (1894–1986)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
992 words

...of us is ‘Is it too good to be true?’ or perhaps I should say ‘Is it too good to last?’ speech at Bedford, 20 July 1957; see slogans never had it so good I thought the best thing to do was to settle up these little local difficulties, and then turn to the wider vision of the Commonwealth. statement at London airport on leaving for a Commonwealth tour, 7 January 1958, following the resignation of the Chancellor of the Exchequer and others in Times 8 January 1958 little local difficulties little local difficulties The wind of change is blowing through...

John Locke

John Locke (1632–1704)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
969 words

...is, his life, liberty, and estate—against the injuries and attempts of other men. Second Treatise of Civil Government (1690) ch. 7, sect. 87 preserve his property injuries and attempts of other men Man being…by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent. Second Treatise of Civil Government (1690) ch. 8, sect. 95 man being…by nature all free political power of another political power of another The only way by which any one divests...

The Bible (Vulgate)

The Bible (Vulgate)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,127 words

...et mundabor; lavabis me, et super nivem dealbabor. You will sprinkle me with hyssop, and I shall be made clean; you will wash me and I shall be made whiter than snow. Psalm 51, v. 7 (Psalm 52, v. 7 in the Authorized Version); see book of common prayer asperges me hyssopo Dominabitur a mari usque ad mare. He shall have dominion from sea to sea. Psalm 71, v. 8 (Psalm 72, v. 8 in the Authorized Version); see mottoes a mari usque ad mare dominion from sea to sea dominion from sea to sea Cantate Domino canticum novum, quia mirabilia fecit. Sing to the...

Cervantes

Cervantes (1547–1616)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
692 words

...With the bread eaten up, up breaks the company. Don Quixote (1605) pt. 2, ch. 7 bread eaten up up breaks the company No todos podemos ser frailes, y muchos son los caminos por donde lleva Dios a los suyos al cielo: religión es la caballería. We cannot all be friars, and many are the ways by which God leads his own to eternal life. Knight-errantry is religion. to Sancho, on his asking whether, to get to heaven, we ought not all to become monks Don Quixote (1605) pt. 2, ch. 8 cannot all be friars knight -errantry is religion Knight-errantry is ...

The Bible

The Bible   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
15,242 words

...the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head. Matthew 8:20. A variant is ‘fowl(s) of the air’ (Genesis 1:26), though much more commonly one finds ‘fowls of the heavens’ in (mostly) the Old Testament. Compare the ‘fish(es) of the sea’, which occurs at least three times in the Old Testament (e.g. Genesis 1:26). ‘All the beasts of the forest’ is biblical, too (Psalm 104:20), though more frequent is ‘beasts of the field’ (e.g. Psalm 8:7). The phrase later made a notable appearance in the nursery rhyme ‘Who Killed Cock Robin?’...

Juvenal

Juvenal (c.ad 60–c.140)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,331 words

...should have the role of a revered parent. Satires no. 7, l. 209 parentis Esse loco teacher should have the role role of a revered parent Nobilitas sola est atque unica virtus. Virtue is the one and only nobility. Satires no, 8, l. 20 virtue is the one and only one and only nobility Summum crede nefas animam praeferre pudori Et propter vitam vivendi perdere causas. Count it the greatest sin to prefer mere existence to honour, and for the sake of life to lose the reasons for living. Satires no. 8, l. 83 vitam vivendi perdere causas vitam vivende...

W. E. Gladstone

W. E. Gladstone (1809–98)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
995 words

...1894; note blubbering Cabinet blubbering cabinet What that Sicilian mule was to me, I have been to the Queen. of a mule on which Gladstone rode, which he ‘could neither love nor like’, although it had rendered him ‘much valuable service’ memorandum, 20 March 1894; H. C. G. Matthew The Gladstone Diaries vol. 8 (1994) Sicilian mule was to me I have been to the queen The God-fearing and God-sustaining University of Oxford. I served her, perhaps mistakenly, but to the best of my ability. farewell message, just before his death, May 1898 Roy Jenkins ...

Anaxagoras

Anaxagoras (c.500––428 bc)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
830 words

...coming into being and perishing; for nothing comes into being nor perishes, but is rather compounded or dissolved from things that are. So they would be right to call coming into being composition and perishing dissolution. Simplicius, Commentary on Aristotle's Physics , 163 , 20–4. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds.), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), p. 358 coming into being call coming into being composition perishing dissolution perishing dissolution Neither is there a smallest part...

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