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Overview

surname

Subject: Law

Family name (last name, in the Western tradition) which a person shares with members of the same family. Cf given names. In Australia a woman may take her husband's surname ...

Surnames

Surnames   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,649 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...not only with etymologies but with past and present distributions of surnames and with the ways in which some names have ramified over time. See George Redmonds , Yorkshire: The West Riding , English Surnames Series (1973) , Richard McKinley's Norfolk and Suffolk Surnames in the Middle Ages ( 1975 ), The Surnames of Oxfordshire ( 1977 ), The Surnames of Lancashire ( 1981 ), and The Surnames of Sussex ( 1988 ), and David Postles's The Surnames of Devon ( 1995 ) and The Surnames of Leicestershire and Rutland ( 1998 ). It became clear that family...

surnames

surnames   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
87 words

... . The fashion for families to have fixed, hereditary surnames began at the top level of society and spread slowly down the social scale. The fashion spread in southern England and East Anglia during the second half of the 13th century and the first half of the 14th century, but took another century to become widespread in northern England and Lowland Scotland. By the 15th century most English people had acquired fixed, hereditary surnames, but Welsh names did not take an English form until the 16th...

surnames

surnames   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
250 words

... . In Ireland a man was called by his own name and that of his father, after mac (‘son’), or his grandfather, after ua /ó (‘grandson’). From the mid‐10th century such patronymics and ‘papponymics’ become fixed surnames. A child was not named directly after a patron saint but was called his ‘devotee’ ( maol ) or ‘servant’ ( giolla ). Both elements are common in surnames, e.g. Ó Maoil Eoin (‘descendant of the devotee of St John’), Mac Giolla Phádraig (‘son of the servant of St Patrick’). Some surnames in Mac contain not the father's name but his...

‘Surnames’, The

‘Surnames’, The   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
44 words

...Surnames’, The . The kinship groups of Northumberland and Cumberland which offered some measure of protection to their members and which had some affinity to Scottish clans . They became an anachronism after the union of the English and Scottish crowns under James I and VI...

‘Surnames’, The

‘Surnames’, The   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
46 words

...Surnames’, The The kinship groups of Northumberland and Cumberland which offered some measure of protection to their members and which had some affinity to Scottish clans . They became an anachronism after the union in 1603 of the English and Scottish Crowns under James I and...

‘Surnames’

‘Surnames’  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The kinship groups of Northumberland and Cumberland which offered some measure of protection to their members and which had some affinity to Scottish clans. They became an anachronism after the union ...
Surname

Surname   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... The name added to, or given over and above, the Christian name (Old French sur -, from Latin super -, ‘over’, ‘above’). Surnames, as names passed from father to son, were not widespread until the 13th century, and grew from the custom of adding the place of domicile or provenance, trade or some descriptive characteristic to the Christian name to assist identification, e.g. York, Butcher, Large and Russell (red-haired). Yet another category derives from family relationship, e.g. Williamson, Fitzmaurice, Macgregor and...

surname

surname   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (9 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
107 words

...surname n. A family name. Upon marriage a wife is entitled to take her husband’s surname (and title or rank) and to continue using it after his death or divorce (unless she uses it for fraudulent purposes), although she is not obliged to do so. A legitimate child, by custom, takes the name of his father and an illegitimate child that of his mother (although the father’s name may be entered on the birth registration if both parents agree or an affiliation order names the man as the putative father). Upon adoption a child automatically takes the name of his...

surname

surname   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
101 words

... A family name. Upon marriage a wife is entitled to take her husband's surname (and title or rank) and to continue using it after his death or divorce (unless she uses it for fraudulent purposes), although she is not obliged to do so. A legitimate child, by custom, takes the name of his father and an illegitimate child that of his mother (although the father's name may be entered on the birth registration if both parents agree or an affiliation order names the man as the putative father). Upon adoption a child automatically takes the name of his adoptive...

surname

surname   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
51 words

...surname Family name (last name, in the Western tradition) which a person shares with members of the same family. Cf given names. In Australia a woman may take her husband’s surname on marriage, but need not do so, and a child of a marriage usually takes his or her father’s surname...

surname

surname   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
174 words

... ; Christian name ; forename ; given name . The surname (or family name ) denotes (wholly or partly) one's kinship. In many cases it was derived from physical characteristics, occupations, or locations and later transmitted to descendants (e.g., Smith); in other cases it indicated paternity (e.g., Davidson). Such names came to be called surnames . The modern custom is that a woman who marries may, but need not, add her husband's surname to her own (e.g., Hillary Rodham Clinton ). In medieval England the Christian name was the baptismal name and...

locative surname

locative surname   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
8 words

...surname . A surname derived from a...

topographical surname

topographical surname   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
16 words

...surname . A surname derived from a feature in the landscape, e.g. Green, Wood, or...

Shakespeare as a surname

Shakespeare as a surname   Reference library

Stanley Wells

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...as a surname . Over 80 spellings of the name are recorded by E. K. Chambers ( William Shakespeare , 1930 ), including ‘Shaxpere’ in the marriage licence and ‘Shaxberd’ in the Revels account. Shakespeare uses variant forms in his surviving signatures, but the now standard spelling predominates, sometimes hyphenated, in printed documents including the dedications to the poems and the Folio. ‘Shakespear’, popular in the 18th century, was used by Shaw ; another spelling reformer, F. J. Furnivall , preferred ‘Shakspere’. Stanley...

surname

surname n   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...surname n 'sɐ:ɹnɛ:m sp surname 2 , sur-name 1 > name ...

surname

surname   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
51 words

... • acclaim , aflame, aim, became, blame, came, claim, dame, exclaim, fame, flame, frame, game, lame, maim, misname, name, proclaim, same, shame, tame • endgame • counterclaim • nickname • byname • filename • forename • surname • airframe • mainframe • Ephraim • doorframe • subframe • underframe •...

surname

surname   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
155 words

... ; Christian name ; forename ; given name . The surname (or last name ) is common to all the members of a family. In many cases it was derived from physical characteristics, occupations, or locations and later transmitted to descendants (e.g., Smith); in other cases it indicated paternity (e.g., Davidson). Such names came to be called surnames from the sire or father. The modern custom is that a woman who marries may, but need not, add her husband's surname to her own (e.g., Hillary Rodham Clinton). The Christian name (or first name ) is older;...

surname

surname   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
44 words

... †name or epithet added to a person's name(s), derived from his birthplace or from some quality or achievement; person's family name XIV. Partial tr. of † surnoun (XIV) — AN. surnoun , (O)F. surnom , f. SUR- 2 + noun NAME ( cf. NOUN ). Hence vb ....

surname

surname n   Reference library

Pocket Oxford Irish Dictionary: English-Irish

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
4 words
surname

surname n.   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford German Dictionary: English German (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
8 words

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