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bare life

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben's concept for life that has been exposed to what he terms the structure of exception that constitutes contemporary biopower. The term originates in ...

Frances Trollope

Frances Trollope (1780–1863)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
53 words

...Frances Trollope 1780 – 1863 English writer , mother of Anthony trollope I draw from life—but I always pulp my acquaintance before serving them up. You would never recognize a pig in a sausage. remark, c. 1848; S. Baring-Gould Early Reminiscences 1834-1864 (1923) pulp my acquaintance pig in a sausage pig in a ...

Boris Pasternak

Boris Pasternak (1890–1960)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
191 words

...live, not to prepare for life. Doctor Zhivago (1958) Man is born to live Man is born to live not to prepare for life Most people experience love, without noticing that there is anything remarkable about it. Doctor Zhivago (1958) Most people love love anything remarkable about it I don't like people who have never fallen or stumbled. Their virtue is lifeless and it isn't of much value. Life hasn't revealed its beauty to them. Doctor Zhivago (1958) people who have never fallen virtue is lifeless The whole human way of life has been destroyed and...

Pierre Bosquet

Pierre Bosquet (181061)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
155 words

...margarine: ‘ C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas le beurre [butter]’; in Oxford Life (1957), Dacre Balsdon quotes a ‘bright young man in a novel’ who said of the façade of Worcester College, Oxford, which has a splendid clock on it, ‘ C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas la gare [station]’. The joke had earlier been applied to Waterhouse Tree Court at Caius Colllege, Cambridge. There is also this limerick: A waitress who lived in Nanterre Shaved the whole of her pubic parts bare. Said the chef in surprise When this sight met his eyes ‘Magnifique, mais ce...

Edna St Vincent Millay

Edna St Vincent Millay (1892–1950)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
378 words

...gives a lovely light. A Few Figs From Thistles (1920) ‘First Fig’ candle burns at both ends candle burns at both ends gives a lovely light Euclid alone Has looked on Beauty bare. Fortunate they Who, though once only and then but far away, Have heard her massive sandal set on stone. The Harp-Weaver and Other Poems (1923) sonnet 22 Euclid alone has looked looked on beauty bare Justice denied in Massachusetts. relating to the trial of Sacco and vanzetti and their execution on 22 August 1927 title of poem (1928) justice denied Justice denied denied in...

Karl Ernst von Baer

Karl Ernst von Baer (1792–1876)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
444 words

...Karl Ernst von Baer 1792 – 1876 German-Russian embryologist and zoologist Let us only imagine that birds had studied their own development and that it was they in turn who investigated the structure of the adult mammal and of man. Wouldn't their physiological textbooks teach the following? ‘Those four and two-legged animals bear many resemblances to embryos, for their cranial bones are separated, and they have no beak, just as we do in the first five or six days of incubation; their extremities are all very much alike, as ours are for about the same...

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
186 words

...never a stain, The pavilion of Heaven is bare, And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams, Build up the blue dome of air, I silently laugh at my own cenotaph, And out of the caverns of rain, Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb, I arise and unbuild it again. The Cloud (1820). In K. Raine (ed.), Shelley (1974), 289 nursling of the sky Like a child from the womb like a ghost from the tomb The One remains, the many change and pass; Heaven's light forever shines, Earth's shadows fly; Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass,...

Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold (1822–88)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
3,446 words

...in their wits genuine poetry is conceived composed in the soul Poetry is at bottom a criticism of life. Essays in Criticism Second Series (1888) ‘Wordsworth’ poetry is at bottom criticism of life criticism of life His expression may often be called bald…but it is bald as the bare mountain tops are bald, with a baldness full of grandeur. Essays in Criticism Second Series (1888) ‘Wordsworth’ bald as the bare mountain bare mountain tops bare mountain tops I am past thirty, and three parts iced over. Howard Foster Lowry (ed.) The Letters of...

Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850–94)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,405 words

...often told in silence Though we are mighty fine fellows nowadays, we cannot write like Hazlitt. Virginibus Puerisque (1881) ‘Walking Tours’ cannot write like Hazlitt cannot write like Hazlitt On he went up the great, bare staircase of his duty, uncheered and undepressed. Weir of Hermiston (1911) ch. 2 bare staircase of his duty bare staircase of his duty uncheered and undepressed uncheered and undepressed What hangs people…is the unfortunate circumstance of guilt. The Wrong Box (with Lloyd Osbourne, 1889) ch. 7 What hangs people unfortunate...

Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser (c.1552–99)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,591 words

...the day through the trembling air Sweet breathing Zephyrus With that, I saw two swans of goodly hue, Come softly swimming down along the Lee. Prothalamion (1596) l. 37 I saw two swans Come softly swimming So purely white they were, That even the gentle stream, the which them bare, Seemed foul to them, and bade his billows spare To wet their silken feathers, lest they might Soil their fair plumes with water not so fair And mar their beauties bright, That shone as Heaven's light, Against their bridal day, which was not long: Sweet Thames, run softly, till I...

W.B. Yeats

W.B. Yeats (18651939)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
723 words

...theme Traditional sanctity and loveliness. ‘Coole Park and Ballylee, 1932’ (1933). Hence, The Last Romantics , title of an appraisal (1949) of Morris, Rossetti, Yeats and Ruskin, by Graham Hough Under bare Ben Bulben's head In Drumcliff churchyard Yeats is laid … On limestone quarried near the spot By his command these words are cut: Cast a cold eye On life, on death . Horseman, pass by! Yeats's epitaph is to be found on his grave in Drumcliff churchyard, Co. Sligo, Ireland, and was written by himself. The wording and the proposed place of burial were...

Jean Baptiste Pierre Antoine de Monet de Lamarck

Jean Baptiste Pierre Antoine de Monet de Lamarck (1744–1829)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,005 words

...Ideology (1982), 102 neither goal nor intention neither goal nor intention life : life was still thought to be It is not the organs—that is, the character and form of the animal's bodily parts—that have given rise to its habits and particular structures. It is the habits and manner of life and the conditions in which its ancestors lived that have in the course of time fashioned its bodily form, its organs and qualities. Attributed It is not the organs habits and manner of life fashioned its bodily form All known living bodies are sharply divided into...

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (1817–62)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
3,101 words

...in Walden , 1854 Most of the luxuries, and many of the so-called comforts, of life are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind. “Economy,” Walden , 1854 This is what you might call a brand-new country. The Maine Woods , 1850 Maine, perhaps, will soon be where Massachusetts is. A good part of her territory is already as bare and commonplace as much of our neighborhood, and her villages generally are not so well shaded as ours. Travel in Concord , in Excursions, Poems, and Familiar Letters , 1863 A man more right...

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
4,095 words

...is alone Life, Joy, Empire and Victory. Prometheus Unbound (1820) act 4, l. 570 woes which Hope thinks infinite forgive wrongs darker than death defy power hope till Hope creates Neither to change , nor falter like thy glory, Titan life , Joy, Empire Life, joy , Empire Life, Joy, empire Empire and victory How wonderful is Death, Death and his brother Sleep! Queen Mab (1813) canto 1, l. 1; see daniel , fletcher death and his brother Death and his brother Death and his brother sleep I dreamed that, as I wandered by the way, Bare Winter...

Anonymous

Anonymous   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
11,058 words

...you fair maid. ‘A-roving’ (traditional song) roving's been my ruin go no more a-roving With you fair maid Back and side go bare, go bare, Both foot and hand go cold: But belly God send thee good ale enough, Whether it be new or old. Gammer Gurton's Needle (1575) act 2 ‘Song’, the play being attributed to William Stevenson ( c. 1530–75) and also to John Still (1543–1608), the song possibly of earlier origin Back and side go bare belly God send thee good ale enough Back of every great work we can find the self-sacrificing devotion of a woman. plaque on...

William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth (1770–1850)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
5,242 words

...title of poem (1807) phantom of delight phantom of delight And now I see with eye serene The very pulse of the machine; A being breathing thoughtful breath; A traveller betwixt life and death. ‘She was a phantom of delight’ (1807) pulse of the machine pulse of the machine breathing thoughtful breath traveller betwixt life and death betwixt life and death betwixt life and death A perfect woman; nobly planned, To warn, to comfort, and command. ‘She was a phantom of delight’ (1807) perfect woman; nobly planned perfect woman ; nobly planned warn ,...

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (1564–1642)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,772 words

...the former as the dictate of the Holy Ghost and the latter as the observant executrix of God's commands. It is necessary for the Bible, in order to be accommodated to the understanding of every man, to speak many things which appear to differ from the absolute truth so far as the bare meaning of the words is concerned. But Nature, on the other hand, is inexorable and immutable; she never transgresses the laws imposed upon her, or cares a whit whether her abstruse reasons and methods of operation are understandable to men. For that reason it appears that nothing...

Ballads

Ballads   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,683 words

...‘His hound is to the hunting gane, His hawk to fetch the wild-fowl hame, His lady's ta'en anither mate, So we may make our dinner sweet. ‘Ye'll sit on his white hause-bane, And I'll pike out his bonny blue e'en: Wi' ae lock o' his gowden hair We'll theek our nest when it grows bare.’ corbies = ravens; fail = turf; hause = neck; theek = thatch ‘The Twa Corbies’ twa corbies gang and dine auld fail dyke new- slain knight new-slain knight his hawk , his hound his hawk, his hound lady fair white hause-bane lock o' his gowden hair theek our nest...

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (1564–1616)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
5,157 words

...spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin?… Thus conscience doth make cowards of us all. Hamlet (1601) oppressor 's wrong law 's delay insolence of office conscience doth make cowards make cowards of us all Madness in great ones must not unwatched go. Hamlet (1601) madness in great ones Madness in great ones Indeed this counsellor Is now most still, most secret, and most grave, Who was in life a foolish prating knave. Hamlet (1601) counsellor Is now most still foolish prating knave And...

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (1564–1616)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
47,628 words

...disprized love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. 70 whips and scorns of time whips and scorns of time oppressor 's wrong proud man's contumely pangs of disprized love law 's delay insolence of office quietus make With a bare bodkin With a bare bodkin The undiscovered country from whose bourn No traveller returns. Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. 79 undiscovered country country from whose bourn No ...

Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon (1561–1626)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
3,456 words

...well of the sciences when in a just scale of ascent, and by successive steps not interrupted or broken, we rise from particulars to lesser axioms; and then to middle axioms, one above the other; and last of all to the most general. For the lowest axioms differ but slightly from bare experience, while the highest and most general (which we now have) are notional and abstract and without solidity. But the middle are the true and solid and living axioms, on which depend the affairs and fortunes of men; and above them again, last of all, those which are indeed...

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